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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Supplements May Be Too Much for Some Older Women

    Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may actually send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 163 older (ages 57 to 90) white women whose vitamin D levels were too low. The women took calcium citrate tablets to meet their recommended intake of 1,200 mg/day, and they took various doses of vitamin D, ranging from 400 to 4,800 IU/day. The trial was limited by ethnicity because different ethnic groups metabolize calcium and vitamin D differently.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/supplements-may-be-too-much-some-older-women

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  3. Today in Lab History: June 19, 1902- Barbara McClintockBarbara McClintock was an American scientist, born June 19, 1902, regarded as one of the most important figures in the history of genetics. In the 1940s and 1950s McClintock’s work on the cytogenetics of maize led her to theorize that genes are transposable — they can move around — on and between chromosomes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-barbara-mcclintock

    Today in Lab History: June 19, 1902- Barbara McClintock

    Barbara McClintock was an American scientist, born June 19, 1902, regarded as one of the most important figures in the history of genetics. In the 1940s and 1950s McClintock’s work on the cytogenetics of maize led her to theorize that genes are transposable — they can move around — on and between chromosomes.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-barbara-mcclintock

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  5. Growth Removal Procedure Can Actually Spread Cancer

    The Food and Drug Administration is warning women that a surgical procedure to remove noncancerous growths from the uterus could inadvertently spread cancer to other parts of the body.

    The agency is discouraging doctors from performing the procedure, which uses an electronically powered device to grind and shred uterine tissue so it can be removed through a small incision in the abdomen. Known as laparoscopic power morcellation, the technique is widely used to treat painful fibroids, either by removing the growths themselves or the entire uterus.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/growth-removal-procedure-can-actually-spread-cancer

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  7. Milk May Delay Osteoarthritis in WomenNew research reports that women who frequently consume fat-free or low-fat milk may delay the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Results published in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) journal, Arthritis Care & Research, published by Wiley, show that women who ate cheese saw an increase in knee OA progression. Yogurt did not impact OA progression in men or women.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/milk-may-delay-osteoarthritis-women

    Milk May Delay Osteoarthritis in Women

    New research reports that women who frequently consume fat-free or low-fat milk may delay the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Results published in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) journal, Arthritis Care & Research, published by Wiley, show that women who ate cheese saw an increase in knee OA progression. Yogurt did not impact OA progression in men or women.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/milk-may-delay-osteoarthritis-women

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  9. Organic Food Doesn’t Lower Cancer RiskWomen who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford Univ. study.Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford’s Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman’s overall risk of cancer.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/organic-food-doesnt-lower-cancer-risk

    Organic Food Doesn’t Lower Cancer Risk

    Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford Univ. study.

    Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford’s Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman’s overall risk of cancer.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/organic-food-doesnt-lower-cancer-risk

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  11. Scientist of the Week: Graham ColditzEvery Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Graham Colditz from the Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis. He and a team found that girls ages nine to 15 who regularly ate peanut butter or nuts were 39 percent less likely to develop benign breast disease by age 30.The original article can be found here: www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/peanut-butter-rich-childhood-may-help-women-avoid-cancerHe speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/scientist-week-graham-colditzHave a question for Graham Colditz? Let usknow and we’ll pass it on!

    Scientist of the Week: Graham Colditz

    Every Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Graham Colditz from the Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis. He and a team found that girls ages nine to 15 who regularly ate peanut butter or nuts were 39 percent less likely to develop benign breast disease by age 30.

    The original article can be found here: www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/peanut-butter-rich-childhood-may-help-women-avoid-cancer

    He speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/scientist-week-graham-colditz

    Have a question for Graham Colditz? Let usknow and we’ll pass it on!

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  13. University Works to Fix Wikipedia’s Female Scientists DeficitLook up a female scientist or technologist on Wikipedia, and you might not find what you’re looking for. Many don’t have detailed pages or any page at all on the free online encyclopedia created by contributors, the vast majority of them men.It’s a symptom of a larger problem for women in so-called STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and mathematics — where men far outnumber women. Even women who have done pioneering work in these fields don’t always get recognition. Since 2009, no woman has won a Nobel Prize in science.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/university-works-fix-wikipedias-female-scientists-deficit

    University Works to Fix Wikipedia’s Female Scientists Deficit

    Look up a female scientist or technologist on Wikipedia, and you might not find what you’re looking for. Many don’t have detailed pages or any page at all on the free online encyclopedia created by contributors, the vast majority of them men.

    It’s a symptom of a larger problem for women in so-called STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and mathematics — where men far outnumber women. Even women who have done pioneering work in these fields don’t always get recognition. Since 2009, no woman has won a Nobel Prize in science.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/university-works-fix-wikipedias-female-scientists-deficit

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  15. Peanut Butter-Rich Childhood May Help Women Avoid CancerHere’s some news worth spreading: girls who eat more peanut butter could improve their breast health later in life. That’s according to a study from Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard Medical School. The research shows that girls ages nine to 15 who regularly ate peanut butter or nuts were 39 percent less likely to develop benign breast disease by age 30.Benign breast disease, although noncancerous, increases risk of breast cancer later in life. “These findings suggest that peanut butter could help reduce the risk of breast cancer in women,” says senior author Graham Colditz, associate director for cancer prevention and control at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington Univ. School of Medicine.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/peanut-butter-rich-childhood-may-help-women-avoid-cancer

    Peanut Butter-Rich Childhood May Help Women Avoid Cancer

    Here’s some news worth spreading: girls who eat more peanut butter could improve their breast health later in life. That’s according to a study from Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard Medical School. The research shows that girls ages nine to 15 who regularly ate peanut butter or nuts were 39 percent less likely to develop benign breast disease by age 30.

    Benign breast disease, although noncancerous, increases risk of breast cancer later in life. “These findings suggest that peanut butter could help reduce the risk of breast cancer in women,” says senior author Graham Colditz, associate director for cancer prevention and control at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington Univ. School of Medicine.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/peanut-butter-rich-childhood-may-help-women-avoid-cancer

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  17. Image of the Week: Pharmaceutical FactoryThis image shows women workers at a pharmaceuticals factory near London packing Mepacrine pills — or Atabrine as it is known in the U.S. — into boxes, 100 at a time, for dispatch overseas in 1945.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/image-week-pharmaceutical-factory

    Image of the Week: Pharmaceutical Factory

    This image shows women workers at a pharmaceuticals factory near London packing Mepacrine pills — or Atabrine as it is known in the U.S. — into boxes, 100 at a time, for dispatch overseas in 1945.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/image-week-pharmaceutical-factory

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  19. Meal Timing Can Improve Fertility in Women with PCOSPolycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder that impairs fertility by impacting menstruation, ovulation, hormones and more, is closely related to insulin levels. Women with the disorder are typically “insulin resistant” — their bodies produce an overabundance of insulin to deliver glucose from the blood into the muscles. The excess makes its way to the ovaries, where it stimulates the production of testosterone, thereby impairing fertility.Now Daniela Jakubowicz of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Diabetes Unit at Wolfson Medical Center has found a natural way to help women of normal weight who suffer from PCOS manage their glucose and insulin levels to improve overall fertility. And she says it’s all in the timing.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/meal-timing-can-improve-fertility-women-pcos

    Meal Timing Can Improve Fertility in Women with PCOS

    Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder that impairs fertility by impacting menstruation, ovulation, hormones and more, is closely related to insulin levels. Women with the disorder are typically “insulin resistant” — their bodies produce an overabundance of insulin to deliver glucose from the blood into the muscles. The excess makes its way to the ovaries, where it stimulates the production of testosterone, thereby impairing fertility.

    Now Daniela Jakubowicz of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Diabetes Unit at Wolfson Medical Center has found a natural way to help women of normal weight who suffer from PCOS manage their glucose and insulin levels to improve overall fertility. And she says it’s all in the timing.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/meal-timing-can-improve-fertility-women-pcos

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  21. Vinegar Cancer Test Saves LivesA simple vinegar test slashed cervical cancer death rates by one-third in a remarkable study of 150,000 women in the slums of India, where the disease is the top cancer killer of women.Doctors reported the results at a cancer conference in Chicago. Experts called the outcome “amazing” and says this quick, cheap test could save tens of thousands of lives each year in developing countries by spotting early signs of cancer, allowing treatment before it’s too late.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/vinegar-cancer-test-saves-lives

    Vinegar Cancer Test Saves Lives

    A simple vinegar test slashed cervical cancer death rates by one-third in a remarkable study of 150,000 women in the slums of India, where the disease is the top cancer killer of women.

    Doctors reported the results at a cancer conference in Chicago. Experts called the outcome “amazing” and says this quick, cheap test could save tens of thousands of lives each year in developing countries by spotting early signs of cancer, allowing treatment before it’s too late.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/vinegar-cancer-test-saves-lives

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  23. Hormone Replacement is SafeA new study has examined the cognitive effects of hormone therapy on memory, language and concentration in menopausal women.A study, published in the Menopause journal, examined the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) E2D, which used a combination of hormones estradiol and drospirenone to treat women. Early postmenopausal women aged between 49 and 55 who had never used HRT were assessed over a six-month period.The treatment resulted in significant improvement in menopausal symptoms including hot flushes, night sweats and sexual function, and it lowered blood pressure and weight in comparison to those who were treated with an identical placebo.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/04/hormone-replacement-safe

    Hormone Replacement is Safe

    A new study has examined the cognitive effects of hormone therapy on memory, language and concentration in menopausal women.

    A study, published in the Menopause journal, examined the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) E2D, which used a combination of hormones estradiol and drospirenone to treat women. Early postmenopausal women aged between 49 and 55 who had never used HRT were assessed over a six-month period.

    The treatment resulted in significant improvement in menopausal symptoms including hot flushes, night sweats and sexual function, and it lowered blood pressure and weight in comparison to those who were treated with an identical placebo.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/04/hormone-replacement-safe

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  25. Calcium, Vitamin D Pills Do Little to Help Healthy WomenPopping calcium and vitamin D pills in hopes of strong bones? Healthy older women shouldn’t bother with relatively low-dose dietary supplements, say new recommendations from a government advisory group.Both nutrients are crucial for healthy bones and specialists advise getting as much as possible from a good diet. The body also makes vitamin D from sunshine. If an older person has a vitamin deficiency or bone-thinning osteoporosis, doctors often prescribe higher-than-normal doses.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/calcium-vitamin-d-pills-do-little-help-healthy-women

    Calcium, Vitamin D Pills Do Little to Help Healthy Women

    Popping calcium and vitamin D pills in hopes of strong bones? Healthy older women shouldn’t bother with relatively low-dose dietary supplements, say new recommendations from a government advisory group.

    Both nutrients are crucial for healthy bones and specialists advise getting as much as possible from a good diet. The body also makes vitamin D from sunshine. If an older person has a vitamin deficiency or bone-thinning osteoporosis, doctors often prescribe higher-than-normal doses.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/calcium-vitamin-d-pills-do-little-help-healthy-women

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  27. Women Have Higher Risk of Hip Implant Failure

    Women appear to have a higher risk of implant failure than men following total hip replacement after considering patient-, surgery-, surgeon-, volume- and implant-specific risk factors, according to a report published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

    Total hip replacement, also known as total hip arthroplasty (THA), is more often performed in women than men. Sex-specific risk factors and outcomes have been investigated in other major surgical procedures and, in theory, might be more important to study in THA because of anatomical differences between men and women, the authors write in the study background.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/women-have-higher-risk-hip-implant-failure

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  29. Gaining Weight Back is Dangerous for Women

    When a woman is postmenopausal and overweight, losing weight is a good thing, but gaining back just a few pounds may actually be detrimental to her cardiovascular health. New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center found that gaining weight back after intentional weight loss is associated with negative long-term effects on some cardiometabolic (CM) risk factors in postmenopausal women.

    In this paper, published online by the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, lead authors Daniel Beavers and Kristen Beavers wanted to look at how weight regain affects health risk in these women. The researchers looked specifically at CM risk factors – a cluster of risk factors that are indicators of a person’s overall risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. They include blood pressure, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose and insulin.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/gaining-weight-back-dangerous-women

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