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  1. Researchers Say You Can Skip BreakfastBreakfast is often said to be the most important meal of the day. Nutritionists regularly suggest it be eaten each morning for many health benefits, including weight loss and weight maintenance. But, new research led by the Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham shows that, when comparing regularly consuming with regularly skipping breakfast, weight loss was not influenced.Past breakfast research, including an examination of 92 studies about the proposed effect of breakfast on obesity also performed at UAB, has found that, while an association exists between breakfast and weight management, the question of whether eating versus skipping breakfast causes differences in weight has not been answered by research, until now.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-say-you-can-skip-breakfast

    Researchers Say You Can Skip Breakfast

    Breakfast is often said to be the most important meal of the day. Nutritionists regularly suggest it be eaten each morning for many health benefits, including weight loss and weight maintenance. But, new research led by the Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham shows that, when comparing regularly consuming with regularly skipping breakfast, weight loss was not influenced.

    Past breakfast research, including an examination of 92 studies about the proposed effect of breakfast on obesity also performed at UAB, has found that, while an association exists between breakfast and weight management, the question of whether eating versus skipping breakfast causes differences in weight has not been answered by research, until now.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-say-you-can-skip-breakfast

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  3. Prunes Can Aid Weight LossResearch by the Univ. of Liverpool has found that eating prunes as part of a weight control diet can improve weight loss.Consumption of dried fruit is not readily recommended during weight loss despite evidence it enhances feelings of fullness.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/prunes-can-aid-weight-loss

    Prunes Can Aid Weight Loss

    Research by the Univ. of Liverpool has found that eating prunes as part of a weight control diet can improve weight loss.

    Consumption of dried fruit is not readily recommended during weight loss despite evidence it enhances feelings of fullness.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/prunes-can-aid-weight-loss

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  5. Thirty Percent of People are Fat, No Country ExemptAlmost a third of the world is now fat, and no country has been able to curb obesity rates in the last three decades, according to a new global analysis.Researchers found more than two billion people worldwide are now overweight or obese. The highest rates were in the Middle East and North Africa, where nearly 60 percent of men and 65 percent of women are heavy. The U.S. has about 13 percent of the world’s fat population, a greater percentage than any other country. China and India combined have about 15 percent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/thirty-percent-people-are-fat-no-country-exempt

    Thirty Percent of People are Fat, No Country Exempt

    Almost a third of the world is now fat, and no country has been able to curb obesity rates in the last three decades, according to a new global analysis.

    Researchers found more than two billion people worldwide are now overweight or obese. The highest rates were in the Middle East and North Africa, where nearly 60 percent of men and 65 percent of women are heavy. The U.S. has about 13 percent of the world’s fat population, a greater percentage than any other country. China and India combined have about 15 percent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/thirty-percent-people-are-fat-no-country-exempt

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  7. MSG Plays Role in Obesity, Fatty Liver DiseaseThe commonly used food additive monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been linked to obesity and disorders associated with the metabolic syndrome including progressive liver disease. A new study that identifies MSG as a critical factor in the initiation of obesity and shows that a restrictive diet cannot counteract this effect but can slow the progression of related liver disease is published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/msg-plays-role-obesity-fatty-liver-disease

    MSG Plays Role in Obesity, Fatty Liver Disease

    The commonly used food additive monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been linked to obesity and disorders associated with the metabolic syndrome including progressive liver disease. A new study that identifies MSG as a critical factor in the initiation of obesity and shows that a restrictive diet cannot counteract this effect but can slow the progression of related liver disease is published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/msg-plays-role-obesity-fatty-liver-disease

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  9. Snacking Linked to Fatty Liver, Abdominal ObesityResearchers from the Netherlands have found that snacking on high-fat and high-sugar foods was independently associated with abdominal fat and fatty liver (hepatic steatosis). According to the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, hypercaloric diet with frequent meals increased intrahepatic triglyceride content (IHTG) and fat around the waist, but increasing meal size did not.Obesity is a global health concern with the World Health Organization reporting that more than 200 million men and close to 300 million women were obese in 2008. In the U.S. the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 36 percent of adult Americans and 17 percent of children in the country are obese. Studies link obesity to the accumulation of abdominal fat and fat in the liver, making non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) one of the most prevalent diseases of the liver.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/snacking-linked-fatty-liver-abdominal-obesity

    Snacking Linked to Fatty Liver, Abdominal Obesity

    Researchers from the Netherlands have found that snacking on high-fat and high-sugar foods was independently associated with abdominal fat and fatty liver (hepatic steatosis). According to the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, hypercaloric diet with frequent meals increased intrahepatic triglyceride content (IHTG) and fat around the waist, but increasing meal size did not.

    Obesity is a global health concern with the World Health Organization reporting that more than 200 million men and close to 300 million women were obese in 2008. In the U.S. the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 36 percent of adult Americans and 17 percent of children in the country are obese. Studies link obesity to the accumulation of abdominal fat and fat in the liver, making non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) one of the most prevalent diseases of the liver.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/snacking-linked-fatty-liver-abdominal-obesity

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  11. Weight Loss in Sheep Reduces Wool QualityA new study into wool production has found that seasonal weight loss can cause reduced strength and appearance retention.The study, involving 24 Australian Merino sheep, found the 12 that experienced experimentally induced weight-loss had significant increases in KAP13.1 and KAP6 proteins that cause reduced wearability and appearance retention in wool fibers.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/weight-loss-sheep-reduces-wool-quality

    Weight Loss in Sheep Reduces Wool Quality

    A new study into wool production has found that seasonal weight loss can cause reduced strength and appearance retention.

    The study, involving 24 Australian Merino sheep, found the 12 that experienced experimentally induced weight-loss had significant increases in KAP13.1 and KAP6 proteins that cause reduced wearability and appearance retention in wool fibers.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/weight-loss-sheep-reduces-wool-quality

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  13. Whey Proteins May Aid Obese AdultsNew evidence shores up findings that whey protein, which is found in milk and cheese, could have health benefits for people who are obese and do not yet have diabetes. The study, which appears in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research, examined how different protein sources affect metabolism.Lars Dragsted, Kjeld Hermansen and colleagues at the Univ. of Copenhagen point out that obesity continues to be a major public health problem worldwide. In the U.S. alone, about 35 percent of adults and about 17 percent of children are obese, a condition that can lead to a number of health issues, including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/whey-proteins-may-aid-obese-adults

    Whey Proteins May Aid Obese Adults

    New evidence shores up findings that whey protein, which is found in milk and cheese, could have health benefits for people who are obese and do not yet have diabetes. The study, which appears in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research, examined how different protein sources affect metabolism.

    Lars Dragsted, Kjeld Hermansen and colleagues at the Univ. of Copenhagen point out that obesity continues to be a major public health problem worldwide. In the U.S. alone, about 35 percent of adults and about 17 percent of children are obese, a condition that can lead to a number of health issues, including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/whey-proteins-may-aid-obese-adults

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  15. Study Says Vitamin D Doesn’t Affect Weight LossA Curtin Univ. study has cast doubt on claims vitamin D helps with fat loss after a meta-analysis of 12 high-quality vitamin D randomized control trials showed it had little impact on adiposity or obesity measures.The School of Public Health study reviewed randomized controlled trials to see whether supplementation with vitamin D without caloric restriction influenced body weight and composition.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-casts-doubt-claims-vitamin-helps-fat-loss

    Study Says Vitamin D Doesn’t Affect Weight Loss

    A Curtin Univ. study has cast doubt on claims vitamin D helps with fat loss after a meta-analysis of 12 high-quality vitamin D randomized control trials showed it had little impact on adiposity or obesity measures.

    The School of Public Health study reviewed randomized controlled trials to see whether supplementation with vitamin D without caloric restriction influenced body weight and composition.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-casts-doubt-claims-vitamin-helps-fat-loss

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  17. Obesity Amplifies Bone, Muscle LossFlorida State Univ. researchers have identified a new syndrome called “osteosarcopenic obesity” that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity."It used to be the thinking that the heavier you were the better your bones would be because the bones were supporting more weight," says Jasminka Ilich-Ernst, the Hazel Stiebeling Professor of Nutrition at Florida State. "But, that’s only true to a certain extent."Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/obesity-amplifies-bone-muscle-loss

    Obesity Amplifies Bone, Muscle Loss

    Florida State Univ. researchers have identified a new syndrome called “osteosarcopenic obesity” that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity.

    "It used to be the thinking that the heavier you were the better your bones would be because the bones were supporting more weight," says Jasminka Ilich-Ernst, the Hazel Stiebeling Professor of Nutrition at Florida State. "But, that’s only true to a certain extent."

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/obesity-amplifies-bone-muscle-loss

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  19. Long-term Antibiotic Use Linked to Weight GainScientists have unearthed still more evidence that antibiotics can contribute to obesity. Research published ahead of print in the American Society for Microbiology journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy suggests that patients on long-term antibiotic treatment gained weight and had significant changes in their gut microbiota.The study, led by Didier Raoult of Aix-Marseille Univ., followed 48 patients who were being treated long-term with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine for Q fever, and 34 control subjects. Nearly one quarter of the treated patients gained anywhere from two to 13 kg (five to 30 lbs), while none of the controls exhibited weight gain. Patients typically received treatment for 18 months.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/long-term-antibiotic-use-linked-weight-gain

    Long-term Antibiotic Use Linked to Weight Gain

    Scientists have unearthed still more evidence that antibiotics can contribute to obesity. Research published ahead of print in the American Society for Microbiology journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy suggests that patients on long-term antibiotic treatment gained weight and had significant changes in their gut microbiota.

    The study, led by Didier Raoult of Aix-Marseille Univ., followed 48 patients who were being treated long-term with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine for Q fever, and 34 control subjects. Nearly one quarter of the treated patients gained anywhere from two to 13 kg (five to 30 lbs), while none of the controls exhibited weight gain. Patients typically received treatment for 18 months.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/long-term-antibiotic-use-linked-weight-gain

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  21. Fatigue is Linked to Junk Food DietA new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around.Life scientists led by UCLA’s Aaron Blaisdell placed 32 female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first, a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. The ingredients in the second were highly processed, of lower quality and included substantially more sugar — a proxy for a junk food diet.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fatigue-linked-junk-food-diet

    Fatigue is Linked to Junk Food Diet

    A new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around.

    Life scientists led by UCLA’s Aaron Blaisdell placed 32 female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first, a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. The ingredients in the second were highly processed, of lower quality and included substantially more sugar — a proxy for a junk food diet.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fatigue-linked-junk-food-diet

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  23. Childhood Obesity Costs $19,000 Over LifetimeChildhood obesity comes with an estimated price tag of $19,000 per child when comparing lifetime medical costs to those of a normal weight child, according to an analysis led by researchers at the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. When multiplied by the number of obese 10-year-olds in the U.S., lifetime medical costs for this age alone reach roughly $14 billion.An alternative estimate, which takes into account the possibility of normal weight children gaining weight in adulthood, reduces the cost to $12,900 per obese child. The findings appear online today, in the journal Pediatrics.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childhood-obesity-costs-19000-over-lifetime

    Childhood Obesity Costs $19,000 Over Lifetime

    Childhood obesity comes with an estimated price tag of $19,000 per child when comparing lifetime medical costs to those of a normal weight child, according to an analysis led by researchers at the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. When multiplied by the number of obese 10-year-olds in the U.S., lifetime medical costs for this age alone reach roughly $14 billion.

    An alternative estimate, which takes into account the possibility of normal weight children gaining weight in adulthood, reduces the cost to $12,900 per obese child. The findings appear online today, in the journal Pediatrics.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childhood-obesity-costs-19000-over-lifetime

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  25. Child’s Obesity Linked to Cognitive FunctionA new Univ. of Illinois study has found that obese children are slower than healthy-weight children to recognize when they have made an error and correct it. The research is the first to show that weight status not only affects how quickly children react to stimuli but also impacts the level of activity that occurs in the cerebral cortex during action monitoring.“I like to explain action monitoring this way: when you’re typing, you don’t have to be looking at your keyboard or your screen to realize that you’ve made a keystroke error. That’s because action monitoring is occurring in your brain’s prefrontal cortex,” says Charles Hillman, a U of I professor of kinesiology and faculty member in the U of I’s Division of Nutritional Sciences.>br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childs-obesity-linked-cognitive-function

    Child’s Obesity Linked to Cognitive Function

    A new Univ. of Illinois study has found that obese children are slower than healthy-weight children to recognize when they have made an error and correct it. The research is the first to show that weight status not only affects how quickly children react to stimuli but also impacts the level of activity that occurs in the cerebral cortex during action monitoring.

    “I like to explain action monitoring this way: when you’re typing, you don’t have to be looking at your keyboard or your screen to realize that you’ve made a keystroke error. That’s because action monitoring is occurring in your brain’s prefrontal cortex,” says Charles Hillman, a U of I professor of kinesiology and faculty member in the U of I’s Division of Nutritional Sciences.
    >br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childs-obesity-linked-cognitive-function

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  27. Study Shows Link Between Obesity, Carb DigestionNew research indicates that obesity in the general population may be genetically linked to how our bodies digest carbohydrates.Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study investigated the relationship between body weight and a gene called AMY1, which is responsible for an enzyme present in our saliva known as salivary amylase. This enzyme is the first to be encountered by food when it enters the mouth, and it begins the process of starch digestion that then continues in the gut.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-shows-link-between-obesity-carb-digestion

    Study Shows Link Between Obesity, Carb Digestion

    New research indicates that obesity in the general population may be genetically linked to how our bodies digest carbohydrates.

    Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study investigated the relationship between body weight and a gene called AMY1, which is responsible for an enzyme present in our saliva known as salivary amylase. This enzyme is the first to be encountered by food when it enters the mouth, and it begins the process of starch digestion that then continues in the gut.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-shows-link-between-obesity-carb-digestion

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  29. Fat Mass in Cells Expands with DisuseOver 35 percent of American adults and 17 percent of American children are considered obese, according to the latest survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associated with diabetes, heart disease, stroke and even certain types of cancer, obesity places a major burden on the health care system and economy. It’s usually treated through a combination of diet, nutrition, exercise and other techniques.To understand how obesity develops, Prof. Amit Gefen, Natan Shaked and Naama Shoham of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, together with Prof. Dafna Benayahu of TAU’s Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, used state-of-the-art technology to analyze the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level. According to their findings, nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity. The mechanics of “cellular expansion” plays a primary role in fat production, they discovered.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/fat-mass-cells-expands-disuse

    Fat Mass in Cells Expands with Disuse

    Over 35 percent of American adults and 17 percent of American children are considered obese, according to the latest survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associated with diabetes, heart disease, stroke and even certain types of cancer, obesity places a major burden on the health care system and economy. It’s usually treated through a combination of diet, nutrition, exercise and other techniques.

    To understand how obesity develops, Prof. Amit Gefen, Natan Shaked and Naama Shoham of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, together with Prof. Dafna Benayahu of TAU’s Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, used state-of-the-art technology to analyze the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level. According to their findings, nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity. The mechanics of “cellular expansion” plays a primary role in fat production, they discovered.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/fat-mass-cells-expands-disuse

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