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  1. Study Says Vitamin D Doesn’t Affect Weight LossA Curtin Univ. study has cast doubt on claims vitamin D helps with fat loss after a meta-analysis of 12 high-quality vitamin D randomized control trials showed it had little impact on adiposity or obesity measures.The School of Public Health study reviewed randomized controlled trials to see whether supplementation with vitamin D without caloric restriction influenced body weight and composition.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-casts-doubt-claims-vitamin-helps-fat-loss

    Study Says Vitamin D Doesn’t Affect Weight Loss

    A Curtin Univ. study has cast doubt on claims vitamin D helps with fat loss after a meta-analysis of 12 high-quality vitamin D randomized control trials showed it had little impact on adiposity or obesity measures.

    The School of Public Health study reviewed randomized controlled trials to see whether supplementation with vitamin D without caloric restriction influenced body weight and composition.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-casts-doubt-claims-vitamin-helps-fat-loss

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  3. Obesity Amplifies Bone, Muscle LossFlorida State Univ. researchers have identified a new syndrome called “osteosarcopenic obesity” that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity."It used to be the thinking that the heavier you were the better your bones would be because the bones were supporting more weight," says Jasminka Ilich-Ernst, the Hazel Stiebeling Professor of Nutrition at Florida State. "But, that’s only true to a certain extent."Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/obesity-amplifies-bone-muscle-loss

    Obesity Amplifies Bone, Muscle Loss

    Florida State Univ. researchers have identified a new syndrome called “osteosarcopenic obesity” that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity.

    "It used to be the thinking that the heavier you were the better your bones would be because the bones were supporting more weight," says Jasminka Ilich-Ernst, the Hazel Stiebeling Professor of Nutrition at Florida State. "But, that’s only true to a certain extent."

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/obesity-amplifies-bone-muscle-loss

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  5. Long-term Antibiotic Use Linked to Weight GainScientists have unearthed still more evidence that antibiotics can contribute to obesity. Research published ahead of print in the American Society for Microbiology journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy suggests that patients on long-term antibiotic treatment gained weight and had significant changes in their gut microbiota.The study, led by Didier Raoult of Aix-Marseille Univ., followed 48 patients who were being treated long-term with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine for Q fever, and 34 control subjects. Nearly one quarter of the treated patients gained anywhere from two to 13 kg (five to 30 lbs), while none of the controls exhibited weight gain. Patients typically received treatment for 18 months.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/long-term-antibiotic-use-linked-weight-gain

    Long-term Antibiotic Use Linked to Weight Gain

    Scientists have unearthed still more evidence that antibiotics can contribute to obesity. Research published ahead of print in the American Society for Microbiology journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy suggests that patients on long-term antibiotic treatment gained weight and had significant changes in their gut microbiota.

    The study, led by Didier Raoult of Aix-Marseille Univ., followed 48 patients who were being treated long-term with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine for Q fever, and 34 control subjects. Nearly one quarter of the treated patients gained anywhere from two to 13 kg (five to 30 lbs), while none of the controls exhibited weight gain. Patients typically received treatment for 18 months.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/long-term-antibiotic-use-linked-weight-gain

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  7. Fatigue is Linked to Junk Food DietA new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around.Life scientists led by UCLA’s Aaron Blaisdell placed 32 female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first, a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. The ingredients in the second were highly processed, of lower quality and included substantially more sugar — a proxy for a junk food diet.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fatigue-linked-junk-food-diet

    Fatigue is Linked to Junk Food Diet

    A new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around.

    Life scientists led by UCLA’s Aaron Blaisdell placed 32 female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first, a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. The ingredients in the second were highly processed, of lower quality and included substantially more sugar — a proxy for a junk food diet.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fatigue-linked-junk-food-diet

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  9. Childhood Obesity Costs $19,000 Over LifetimeChildhood obesity comes with an estimated price tag of $19,000 per child when comparing lifetime medical costs to those of a normal weight child, according to an analysis led by researchers at the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. When multiplied by the number of obese 10-year-olds in the U.S., lifetime medical costs for this age alone reach roughly $14 billion.An alternative estimate, which takes into account the possibility of normal weight children gaining weight in adulthood, reduces the cost to $12,900 per obese child. The findings appear online today, in the journal Pediatrics.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childhood-obesity-costs-19000-over-lifetime

    Childhood Obesity Costs $19,000 Over Lifetime

    Childhood obesity comes with an estimated price tag of $19,000 per child when comparing lifetime medical costs to those of a normal weight child, according to an analysis led by researchers at the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. When multiplied by the number of obese 10-year-olds in the U.S., lifetime medical costs for this age alone reach roughly $14 billion.

    An alternative estimate, which takes into account the possibility of normal weight children gaining weight in adulthood, reduces the cost to $12,900 per obese child. The findings appear online today, in the journal Pediatrics.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childhood-obesity-costs-19000-over-lifetime

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  11. Child’s Obesity Linked to Cognitive FunctionA new Univ. of Illinois study has found that obese children are slower than healthy-weight children to recognize when they have made an error and correct it. The research is the first to show that weight status not only affects how quickly children react to stimuli but also impacts the level of activity that occurs in the cerebral cortex during action monitoring.“I like to explain action monitoring this way: when you’re typing, you don’t have to be looking at your keyboard or your screen to realize that you’ve made a keystroke error. That’s because action monitoring is occurring in your brain’s prefrontal cortex,” says Charles Hillman, a U of I professor of kinesiology and faculty member in the U of I’s Division of Nutritional Sciences.>br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childs-obesity-linked-cognitive-function

    Child’s Obesity Linked to Cognitive Function

    A new Univ. of Illinois study has found that obese children are slower than healthy-weight children to recognize when they have made an error and correct it. The research is the first to show that weight status not only affects how quickly children react to stimuli but also impacts the level of activity that occurs in the cerebral cortex during action monitoring.

    “I like to explain action monitoring this way: when you’re typing, you don’t have to be looking at your keyboard or your screen to realize that you’ve made a keystroke error. That’s because action monitoring is occurring in your brain’s prefrontal cortex,” says Charles Hillman, a U of I professor of kinesiology and faculty member in the U of I’s Division of Nutritional Sciences.
    >br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childs-obesity-linked-cognitive-function

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  13. Study Shows Link Between Obesity, Carb DigestionNew research indicates that obesity in the general population may be genetically linked to how our bodies digest carbohydrates.Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study investigated the relationship between body weight and a gene called AMY1, which is responsible for an enzyme present in our saliva known as salivary amylase. This enzyme is the first to be encountered by food when it enters the mouth, and it begins the process of starch digestion that then continues in the gut.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-shows-link-between-obesity-carb-digestion

    Study Shows Link Between Obesity, Carb Digestion

    New research indicates that obesity in the general population may be genetically linked to how our bodies digest carbohydrates.

    Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study investigated the relationship between body weight and a gene called AMY1, which is responsible for an enzyme present in our saliva known as salivary amylase. This enzyme is the first to be encountered by food when it enters the mouth, and it begins the process of starch digestion that then continues in the gut.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-shows-link-between-obesity-carb-digestion

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  15. Fat Mass in Cells Expands with DisuseOver 35 percent of American adults and 17 percent of American children are considered obese, according to the latest survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associated with diabetes, heart disease, stroke and even certain types of cancer, obesity places a major burden on the health care system and economy. It’s usually treated through a combination of diet, nutrition, exercise and other techniques.To understand how obesity develops, Prof. Amit Gefen, Natan Shaked and Naama Shoham of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, together with Prof. Dafna Benayahu of TAU’s Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, used state-of-the-art technology to analyze the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level. According to their findings, nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity. The mechanics of “cellular expansion” plays a primary role in fat production, they discovered.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/fat-mass-cells-expands-disuse

    Fat Mass in Cells Expands with Disuse

    Over 35 percent of American adults and 17 percent of American children are considered obese, according to the latest survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associated with diabetes, heart disease, stroke and even certain types of cancer, obesity places a major burden on the health care system and economy. It’s usually treated through a combination of diet, nutrition, exercise and other techniques.

    To understand how obesity develops, Prof. Amit Gefen, Natan Shaked and Naama Shoham of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, together with Prof. Dafna Benayahu of TAU’s Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, used state-of-the-art technology to analyze the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level. According to their findings, nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity. The mechanics of “cellular expansion” plays a primary role in fat production, they discovered.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/fat-mass-cells-expands-disuse

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  17. Engineers Suggest Gas Stations in SpaceFuture lunar missions may be fueled by gas stations in space. According to MIT engineers, a spacecraft might dock at a propellant depot, somewhere between the Earth and the moon, and pick up extra rocket fuel before making its way to the lunar surface.Orbiting way stations could reduce the fuel a spacecraft needs to carry from Earth — and with less fuel onboard, a rocket could launch heavier payloads, such as large scientific experiments. Over the last few decades, scientists have proposed various designs, such as building a fuel-manufacturing station on the moon and sending tankers to refill floating depots. But most ideas have come with hefty price tags, requiring long-term investment.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/engineers-suggest-gas-stations-space

    Engineers Suggest Gas Stations in Space

    Future lunar missions may be fueled by gas stations in space. According to MIT engineers, a spacecraft might dock at a propellant depot, somewhere between the Earth and the moon, and pick up extra rocket fuel before making its way to the lunar surface.

    Orbiting way stations could reduce the fuel a spacecraft needs to carry from Earth — and with less fuel onboard, a rocket could launch heavier payloads, such as large scientific experiments. Over the last few decades, scientists have proposed various designs, such as building a fuel-manufacturing station on the moon and sending tankers to refill floating depots. But most ideas have come with hefty price tags, requiring long-term investment.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/engineers-suggest-gas-stations-space

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  19. Cost of Fruits, Vegetables Linked to Kids’ BMIHigh prices for fresh fruits and vegetables are associated with higher Body Mass Index (BMI) in young children in low- and middle-income households, according to American Univ. researchers in the journal Pediatrics.“There is a small, but significant, association between the prices of fruit and vegetables and higher child BMI,” says Taryn Morrissey, the study’s lead author and assistant professor of public administration and policy at AU’s School of Public Affairs.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/cost-fruits-vegetables-linked-kids-bmi

    Cost of Fruits, Vegetables Linked to Kids’ BMI

    High prices for fresh fruits and vegetables are associated with higher Body Mass Index (BMI) in young children in low- and middle-income households, according to American Univ. researchers in the journal Pediatrics.

    “There is a small, but significant, association between the prices of fruit and vegetables and higher child BMI,” says Taryn Morrissey, the study’s lead author and assistant professor of public administration and policy at AU’s School of Public Affairs.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/cost-fruits-vegetables-linked-kids-bmi

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  21. Obese People Get Less than a Minute of Exercise Per DayResearchers at the Univ. of South Carolina’s Arnold School of Public Health have validated a new method for calculating physical activity, sedentary behavior and the food energy requirements of Americans. The results suggest that as a nation, we spend more than 15 hours per day sleeping and sitting, and that obese men and women spend less than one minute per day in vigorous activity.The study, led by Arnold School exercise scientist and epidemiologist Edward Archer and published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, used accelerometry based technology to validate a protocol for calculating energy expenditure and food energy requirements. The study of the Physical Activity Ratio (PAR) protocol is significant because it provides the first nationally representative estimates of total daily energy expenditure, physical activity and sedentary behavior for the U.S. population.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/obese-people-get-less-minute-exercise-day

    Obese People Get Less than a Minute of Exercise Per Day

    Researchers at the Univ. of South Carolina’s Arnold School of Public Health have validated a new method for calculating physical activity, sedentary behavior and the food energy requirements of Americans. The results suggest that as a nation, we spend more than 15 hours per day sleeping and sitting, and that obese men and women spend less than one minute per day in vigorous activity.

    The study, led by Arnold School exercise scientist and epidemiologist Edward Archer and published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, used accelerometry based technology to validate a protocol for calculating energy expenditure and food energy requirements. The study of the Physical Activity Ratio (PAR) protocol is significant because it provides the first nationally representative estimates of total daily energy expenditure, physical activity and sedentary behavior for the U.S. population.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/obese-people-get-less-minute-exercise-day

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  23. Shivering, Exercise May Convert White Fat to BrownA new study suggests that shivering and bouts of moderate exercise are equally capable of stimulating the conversion of energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat.Around 50 g of white fat stores more than 300 kilocalories of energy. The same amount of brown fat could burn up to 300 kilocalories a day.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/shivering-exercise-may-convert-white-fat-brown

    Shivering, Exercise May Convert White Fat to Brown

    A new study suggests that shivering and bouts of moderate exercise are equally capable of stimulating the conversion of energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat.

    Around 50 g of white fat stores more than 300 kilocalories of energy. The same amount of brown fat could burn up to 300 kilocalories a day.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/shivering-exercise-may-convert-white-fat-brown

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  25. Two Thirds of Adults Overweight, Obese in England

    Two out of three adults in England are overweight or obese, according to new figures by the national public health agency.

    The figures were released this week. Experts have previously predicted England’s increasing obesity epidemic could mean half its population will be obese by 2030. People who are heavy have a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/two-thirds-adults-overweight-obese-england

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  27. Morning-after Pill May Be Less Effective for Heavy WomenThe European Medicines Agency says it has started a review of emergency contraceptives to see if they work less effectively in heavy women.In November, French drug maker HRA Pharma announced its morning-after pill Norvelo was less effective in women weighing more than 75 kilograms (165 pounds) and that it didn’t work in women more than 80 kilograms (176 pounds). HRA Pharma changed its labels to warn patients after consulting with European regulators. The EMA says it will evaluate new data suggesting that a high body weight could compromise the effectiveness of the morning-after pill.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/morning-after-pill-may-be-less-effective-heavy-women

    Morning-after Pill May Be Less Effective for Heavy Women

    The European Medicines Agency says it has started a review of emergency contraceptives to see if they work less effectively in heavy women.

    In November, French drug maker HRA Pharma announced its morning-after pill Norvelo was less effective in women weighing more than 75 kilograms (165 pounds) and that it didn’t work in women more than 80 kilograms (176 pounds). HRA Pharma changed its labels to warn patients after consulting with European regulators. The EMA says it will evaluate new data suggesting that a high body weight could compromise the effectiveness of the morning-after pill.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/morning-after-pill-may-be-less-effective-heavy-women

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  29. Diet Soda Isn’t the Key to Weight LossHeavy adults who believe drinking diet soda will help them lose or keep weight off should think again. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who examined national patterns in adult diet beverage consumption and calorie intake found that overweight and obese adults who drink diet beverages consume more calories from food than obese or overweight adults who drink regular soda or other sugary beverages. The results are featured in the American Journal of Public Health.“Although overweight and obese adults who drink diet soda eat a comparable amount of total calories as heavier adults who drink sugary beverages, they consume significantly more calories from solid food at both meals and snacks,” says Sara Bleich, associate professor with the Bloomberg School’s Department of Health Policy and Management and lead author of the paper.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/diet-soda-isn%E2%80%99t-key-weight-loss

    Diet Soda Isn’t the Key to Weight Loss

    Heavy adults who believe drinking diet soda will help them lose or keep weight off should think again. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who examined national patterns in adult diet beverage consumption and calorie intake found that overweight and obese adults who drink diet beverages consume more calories from food than obese or overweight adults who drink regular soda or other sugary beverages. The results are featured in the American Journal of Public Health.

    “Although overweight and obese adults who drink diet soda eat a comparable amount of total calories as heavier adults who drink sugary beverages, they consume significantly more calories from solid food at both meals and snacks,” says Sara Bleich, associate professor with the Bloomberg School’s Department of Health Policy and Management and lead author of the paper.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/diet-soda-isn%E2%80%99t-key-weight-loss

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