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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Computers to Replace Humans for Announcing Weather

    Two outpost offices of the National Weather Service in Alaska are finally ending what has been a bygone practice for most of the nation for almost two decades — using real human voices in radio forecast broadcasts.

    The Nome and Kodiak offices are switching to computerized voices that nationally go by the names of Tom, Donna and, in some parts of the country, Spanish-speaking Javier. It’s an idea first hatched in the mid-1990s as part of a move to modernize the weather service, an agency of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/computers-replace-humans-announcing-weather

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  3. Researchers: No Limits to Human Impact on CloudsUnderstanding how clouds affect the climate has been a difficult proposition. What controls the makeup of the low clouds that cool the atmosphere or the high ones that trap heat underneath? How does human activity change patterns of cloud formation? Now, the research of the Weizmann Institute’s Prof. Ilan Koren suggests we may be nudging cloud formation in the direction of added area and height. He and his team have analyzed a unique type of cloud formation; their findings, which appeared recently in Science indicate that in pre-industrial times, there was less cloud cover over areas of pristine ocean than is found there today.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-no-limits-human-impact-clouds

    Researchers: No Limits to Human Impact on Clouds

    Understanding how clouds affect the climate has been a difficult proposition. What controls the makeup of the low clouds that cool the atmosphere or the high ones that trap heat underneath? How does human activity change patterns of cloud formation? Now, the research of the Weizmann Institute’s Prof. Ilan Koren suggests we may be nudging cloud formation in the direction of added area and height. He and his team have analyzed a unique type of cloud formation; their findings, which appeared recently in Science indicate that in pre-industrial times, there was less cloud cover over areas of pristine ocean than is found there today.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-no-limits-human-impact-clouds

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  5. Drones Used as Hurricane Research ToolsThe point where the roiling ocean meets the fury of a hurricane’s winds may hold the key to improving storm intensity forecasts — but it’s nearly impossible for scientists to see.That may change this summer, thanks to post-Hurricane Sandy federal funding and a handful of winged drones that can spend hours spiraling in a hurricane’s dark places, transmitting data that could help forecasters understand what makes some storms fizzle while others strengthen into monsters. Knowing that information while a storm is still far offshore could help emergency managers better plan for evacuations or storm surge risks.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/drones-used-hurricane-research-tools

    Drones Used as Hurricane Research Tools

    The point where the roiling ocean meets the fury of a hurricane’s winds may hold the key to improving storm intensity forecasts — but it’s nearly impossible for scientists to see.

    That may change this summer, thanks to post-Hurricane Sandy federal funding and a handful of winged drones that can spend hours spiraling in a hurricane’s dark places, transmitting data that could help forecasters understand what makes some storms fizzle while others strengthen into monsters. Knowing that information while a storm is still far offshore could help emergency managers better plan for evacuations or storm surge risks.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/drones-used-hurricane-research-tools

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  7. Fingers Crossed: NOAA Predicts Slow Hurricane SeasonFederal forecasters are expected to predict a slower than usual hurricane season this year.Experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration gathered in New York today to release the agency’s outlook for the six-month storm season that officially begins June 1. Colorado State Univ. researchers have forecast nine named storms in 2014, with just three expected to become hurricanes and one major storm with winds over 110 mph.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/fingers-crossed-noaa-predicts-slow-hurricane-season

    Fingers Crossed: NOAA Predicts Slow Hurricane Season

    Federal forecasters are expected to predict a slower than usual hurricane season this year.

    Experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration gathered in New York today to release the agency’s outlook for the six-month storm season that officially begins June 1. Colorado State Univ. researchers have forecast nine named storms in 2014, with just three expected to become hurricanes and one major storm with winds over 110 mph.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/fingers-crossed-noaa-predicts-slow-hurricane-season

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  9. Fears of Tornados Rouse Interest in SheltersLast year’s tornado season wasn’t the worst in Oklahoma history, either in the number of twisters or the number of lives taken.But the deadly barrage that killed more than 30 people scared Oklahomans in a way that previous storms had not, moving them to add tornado shelters or reinforced safe rooms to their homes.There’s just one problem: the surge of interest in tornado safety has overwhelmed companies that build the shelters, creating long waiting lists and forcing many people to endure the most dangerous part of this season without any added protection.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/fears-tornados-rouse-interest-shelters

    Fears of Tornados Rouse Interest in Shelters

    Last year’s tornado season wasn’t the worst in Oklahoma history, either in the number of twisters or the number of lives taken.

    But the deadly barrage that killed more than 30 people scared Oklahomans in a way that previous storms had not, moving them to add tornado shelters or reinforced safe rooms to their homes.

    There’s just one problem: the surge of interest in tornado safety has overwhelmed companies that build the shelters, creating long waiting lists and forcing many people to endure the most dangerous part of this season without any added protection.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/fears-tornados-rouse-interest-shelters

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  11. Asian Pollution Affects World’s Weather
The first study that combines different scales — cloud-sized and earth-sized — into one model to simulate the effects of Asian pollution on the Pacific storm track has shown that the pollution can influence weather over much of the world. These results show that using multiple scales in one model greatly improves the accuracy of climate simulations.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/climate-model-reconstructs-pacific-storm-track

    Asian Pollution Affects World’s Weather

    The first study that combines different scales — cloud-sized and earth-sized — into one model to simulate the effects of Asian pollution on the Pacific storm track has shown that the pollution can influence weather over much of the world. These results show that using multiple scales in one model greatly improves the accuracy of climate simulations.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/climate-model-reconstructs-pacific-storm-track

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  13. 'Dressed' Laser May Induce Rain, LightningThe adage, “Everyone complains about the weather but nobody does anything about it,” may one day be obsolete if researchers at the Univ. of Central Florida’s College of Optics & Photonics and the Univ. of Arizona further develop a new technique to aim a high-energy laser beam into clouds to make it rain or trigger lightning.The solution? Surround the beam with a second beam to act as an energy reservoir, sustaining the central beam to greater distances than previously possible. The secondary “dress” beam refuels and helps prevent the dissipation of the high-intensity primary beam, which on its own would break down quickly.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/dressed-laser-may-induce-rain-lightning

    'Dressed' Laser May Induce Rain, Lightning

    The adage, “Everyone complains about the weather but nobody does anything about it,” may one day be obsolete if researchers at the Univ. of Central Florida’s College of Optics & Photonics and the Univ. of Arizona further develop a new technique to aim a high-energy laser beam into clouds to make it rain or trigger lightning.

    The solution? Surround the beam with a second beam to act as an energy reservoir, sustaining the central beam to greater distances than previously possible. The secondary “dress” beam refuels and helps prevent the dissipation of the high-intensity primary beam, which on its own would break down quickly.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/dressed-laser-may-induce-rain-lightning

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  15. 'Transition Zones' Appear to Be Tornado HotspotsAreas where landscape shifts from urban to rural or forest to farmland may have a higher likelihood of severe weather and tornado touchdowns, a Purdue Univ. study says.An examination of more than 60 years of Indiana tornado climatology data from the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center showed that a majority of tornado touchdowns occurred near areas where dramatically different landscapes meet — for example, where a city fades into farmland or a forest meets a plain.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/transition-zones-appear-be-tornado-hotspots

    'Transition Zones' Appear to Be Tornado Hotspots

    Areas where landscape shifts from urban to rural or forest to farmland may have a higher likelihood of severe weather and tornado touchdowns, a Purdue Univ. study says.

    An examination of more than 60 years of Indiana tornado climatology data from the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center showed that a majority of tornado touchdowns occurred near areas where dramatically different landscapes meet — for example, where a city fades into farmland or a forest meets a plain.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/transition-zones-appear-be-tornado-hotspots

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  17. Asia’s Dust Strengthens India’s MonsoonA new analysis of satellite data reveals a link between dust in North Africa and West Asia and stronger monsoons in India. The study shows that dust in the air absorbs sunlight west of India, warming the air and strengthening the winds carrying moisture eastward. This results in more monsoon rainfall about a week later in India. The results explain one way that dust can affect the climate, filling in previously unknown details about the Earth system.The study also shows that natural airborne particles can influence rainfall in unexpected ways, with changes in one location rapidly affecting weather thousands of miles away. The researchers analyzed satellite data and performed computer modeling of the region to tease out the role of dust on the Indian monsoon, they report in Nature Geoscience.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/asias-dust-strengthens-indias-monsoon

    Asia’s Dust Strengthens India’s Monsoon

    A new analysis of satellite data reveals a link between dust in North Africa and West Asia and stronger monsoons in India. The study shows that dust in the air absorbs sunlight west of India, warming the air and strengthening the winds carrying moisture eastward. This results in more monsoon rainfall about a week later in India. The results explain one way that dust can affect the climate, filling in previously unknown details about the Earth system.

    The study also shows that natural airborne particles can influence rainfall in unexpected ways, with changes in one location rapidly affecting weather thousands of miles away. The researchers analyzed satellite data and performed computer modeling of the region to tease out the role of dust on the Indian monsoon, they report in Nature Geoscience.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/asias-dust-strengthens-indias-monsoon

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  19. Jet Stream ConvulsionsThe jet stream is the primary driver for most weather patterns and this winter its departure from the normal lateral (west to east) movement and variations seen over the past few decades appears to have effected longer lasting stable flows with stronger and deeper north to south changes. The jet stream’s northerly flows along the U.S. Pacific coast have resulted in less rainfall in California and a significantly warmer southern Alaska region. As the jet stream reversed its flow over central northern Canada, it brought with it the Polar Vortex, resulting in long-lasting cold spells into the deep south and then strong winter storms along the eastern seaboard as it reversed once again.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2014/03/jet-stream-convulsions

    Jet Stream Convulsions

    The jet stream is the primary driver for most weather patterns and this winter its departure from the normal lateral (west to east) movement and variations seen over the past few decades appears to have effected longer lasting stable flows with stronger and deeper north to south changes. The jet stream’s northerly flows along the U.S. Pacific coast have resulted in less rainfall in California and a significantly warmer southern Alaska region. As the jet stream reversed its flow over central northern Canada, it brought with it the Polar Vortex, resulting in long-lasting cold spells into the deep south and then strong winter storms along the eastern seaboard as it reversed once again.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2014/03/jet-stream-convulsions

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  21. El Nino is Good News for U.S. Weather Woes

    Federal forecasters predict a warming of the central Pacific Ocean this year that will change weather worldwide. And that’s good news for a weather-weary U.S.

    The warming, called an El Nino, is expected to lead to fewer Atlantic hurricanes and more rain next winter for drought-stricken California and southern states, and even a milder winter for the nation’s frigid northern tier next year, meteorologists say.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/el-nino-good-news-us-weather-woes

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  23. Study Makes Area Around Train Tracks Safer in WinterResults of an EPFL study on ballast projections in exceptional winter conditions have enabled Swiss Federal Railways (SBB) to set-up measures to improve safety around the tracks.SBB transports close to one million passengers per day, by any weather even in tough winter conditions. In 2012, striving to better safety, SBB mandated the EPFL Transportation Center to study the phenomenon of ballast projection by very cold weather. The results from this study have enabled SBB to undertake measures of improvement.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/study-makes-area-around-train-tracks-safer-winter

    Study Makes Area Around Train Tracks Safer in Winter

    Results of an EPFL study on ballast projections in exceptional winter conditions have enabled Swiss Federal Railways (SBB) to set-up measures to improve safety around the tracks.

    SBB transports close to one million passengers per day, by any weather even in tough winter conditions. In 2012, striving to better safety, SBB mandated the EPFL Transportation Center to study the phenomenon of ballast projection by very cold weather. The results from this study have enabled SBB to undertake measures of improvement.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/study-makes-area-around-train-tracks-safer-winter

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  25. Rain Triggers Collapse in Pompeii

    A section of wall around an ancient shop in Pompeii is the latest casualty of rain in one of Italy’s most popular archaeological sites.

    Pompeii’s archaeological office said today, Monday, March 3, a section of the recently restored wall had collapsed. The damage is in an area long closed to the public, at the edge of the excavations of the ancient Roman city.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/rain-triggers-collapse-pompeii

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  27. NASA, Japan Launch Satellite to Measure Rain, SnowThe Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, a joint Earth-observing mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), thundered into space at 1:37 p.m. EST Thursday, Feb. 27 (3:37 a.m. JST Friday, Feb. 28) from Japan.The four-ton spacecraft launched aboard a Japanese H-IIA rocket from Tanegashima Space Center on Tanegashima Island in southern Japan. The GPM spacecraft separated from the rocket 16 minutes after launch, at an altitude of 247 miles (398 kilometers). The solar arrays deployed 10 minutes after spacecraft separation, to power the spacecraft.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/nasa-japan-launch-satellite-measure-rain-snow

    NASA, Japan Launch Satellite to Measure Rain, Snow

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, a joint Earth-observing mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), thundered into space at 1:37 p.m. EST Thursday, Feb. 27 (3:37 a.m. JST Friday, Feb. 28) from Japan.

    The four-ton spacecraft launched aboard a Japanese H-IIA rocket from Tanegashima Space Center on Tanegashima Island in southern Japan. The GPM spacecraft separated from the rocket 16 minutes after launch, at an altitude of 247 miles (398 kilometers). The solar arrays deployed 10 minutes after spacecraft separation, to power the spacecraft.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/nasa-japan-launch-satellite-measure-rain-snow

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  29. World had Fourth Warmest January Ever Recorded

    The globe cozied up to the fourth warmest January on record this year, essentially leaving just the eastern half of the U.S. out in the cold. And the northern and eastern United States can expect another blast of cold weather next week.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports that Earth was 1.17 degrees warmer in January than the 20th century average. Since records began in 1880, only 2002, 2003 and 2007 started off warmer than this year.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/world-had-fourth-warmest-january-ever-recorded

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