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  1. LED Light May Aid SkinThere was a time when no one thought about light bulbs — one blew, you screwed another one in. Nowadays, it’s more complicated, as energy efficiency concerns have given rise to a slew of options, including incandescent, compact fluorescent lights, and light emitting diodes.LEDs are the most expensive option, but they are also the most energy efficient, are getting more cost-efficient, and they are growing in popularity. With this increasing acceptance, concerns have arisen about long- or short-term direct skin exposure—especially since a 2012 SBU study found that contact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs can harm skin cells due to UV-light emittance.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/led-light-may-aid-skin

    LED Light May Aid Skin

    There was a time when no one thought about light bulbs — one blew, you screwed another one in. Nowadays, it’s more complicated, as energy efficiency concerns have given rise to a slew of options, including incandescent, compact fluorescent lights, and light emitting diodes.

    LEDs are the most expensive option, but they are also the most energy efficient, are getting more cost-efficient, and they are growing in popularity. With this increasing acceptance, concerns have arisen about long- or short-term direct skin exposure—especially since a 2012 SBU study found that contact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs can harm skin cells due to UV-light emittance.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/led-light-may-aid-skin

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  3. MRI Sensor May Help Diagnose, Fight CancerUnlike healthy cells, cancer cells thrive when deprived of oxygen. Tumors in low-oxygen environments tend to be more resistant to therapy and spread more aggressively to other parts of the body.Measuring tumors’ oxygen levels could help doctors make decisions about treatments, but there’s currently no reliable, noninvasive way to make such measurements. However, a new sensor developed at MIT could change that: a research team led by professor Michael Cima has invented an injectable device that reveals oxygen levels over several weeks and can be read with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Using this kind of sensor, doctors may be able to better determine radiation doses and to monitor whether treatments are having the desired effect, according to the researchers, who describe the device in PNAS this week.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/mri-sensor-may-help-diagnose-fight-cancer

    MRI Sensor May Help Diagnose, Fight Cancer

    Unlike healthy cells, cancer cells thrive when deprived of oxygen. Tumors in low-oxygen environments tend to be more resistant to therapy and spread more aggressively to other parts of the body.

    Measuring tumors’ oxygen levels could help doctors make decisions about treatments, but there’s currently no reliable, noninvasive way to make such measurements. However, a new sensor developed at MIT could change that: a research team led by professor Michael Cima has invented an injectable device that reveals oxygen levels over several weeks and can be read with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Using this kind of sensor, doctors may be able to better determine radiation doses and to monitor whether treatments are having the desired effect, according to the researchers, who describe the device in PNAS this week.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/mri-sensor-may-help-diagnose-fight-cancer

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  5. Plant-derived Nanotubes Enable Personalized DNA DeliveryPersonalized medicine took one step closer to reality recently with the development of plant-derived nanotubes.These nanotubes – tiny structures several hundred times thinner than a human hair – hone in on specific tissues in the body and deliver their cargo, in this study’s case, a healthy gene to help override a dysfunctional copy. Nanotubes have many uses, such as delivering chemotherapy drugs directly to a tumor. As of now, chemotherapy is delivered to the entire system and often causes damage to healthy tissue. Using this direct-delivery method, chemotherapy can maximize its effectiveness on tumors while minimizing harm to healthy tissue.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/plant-derived-nanotubes-enable-personalized-dna-delivery

    Plant-derived Nanotubes Enable Personalized DNA Delivery

    Personalized medicine took one step closer to reality recently with the development of plant-derived nanotubes.

    These nanotubes – tiny structures several hundred times thinner than a human hair – hone in on specific tissues in the body and deliver their cargo, in this study’s case, a healthy gene to help override a dysfunctional copy. Nanotubes have many uses, such as delivering chemotherapy drugs directly to a tumor. As of now, chemotherapy is delivered to the entire system and often causes damage to healthy tissue. Using this direct-delivery method, chemotherapy can maximize its effectiveness on tumors while minimizing harm to healthy tissue.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/plant-derived-nanotubes-enable-personalized-dna-delivery

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  7. Solving Mystery Key to Less Toxic AntifungalsScientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery – and in the process have found a potentially less toxic way to fight invasive fungal infections, which kill about 1.5 million people a year. The researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years – even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks.“Invasive fungal infections are a very important unmet medical need,” says Univ. of Illinois and Howard Hughes Medical Institute chemistry professor Martin Burke, who led the study with chemistry professor Chad Rienstra. “There are about three million cases per year and what’s striking is that, even in 2014, half the patients who come into the hospital with an invasive fungal infection in their blood die.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/solving-mystery-key-less-toxic-antifungals

    Solving Mystery Key to Less Toxic Antifungals

    Scientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery – and in the process have found a potentially less toxic way to fight invasive fungal infections, which kill about 1.5 million people a year. The researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years – even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks.

    “Invasive fungal infections are a very important unmet medical need,” says Univ. of Illinois and Howard Hughes Medical Institute chemistry professor Martin Burke, who led the study with chemistry professor Chad Rienstra. “There are about three million cases per year and what’s striking is that, even in 2014, half the patients who come into the hospital with an invasive fungal infection in their blood die.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/solving-mystery-key-less-toxic-antifungals

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  9. Combination Therapy Proves Effective Against Hep C

    Treatment options for the 170 million people worldwide with chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are evolving rapidly, although the available regimens often come with significant side effects. Two multi-center clinical trials led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center show promise for a new option that could help lead to an increase in patients cured with a much more simple and tolerable all oral therapy.

    A new 12-week single tablet regimen of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir have proven to be highly effective in treating a broad range of patients with HCV genotype 1, a form of the virus found in up to 75 percent of infections, according to results unveiled at the European Association for the Study of the Liver and published online by the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/combination-therapy-proves-effective-against-hep-c

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  11. Research Uncovers Mode of Action on New MS DrugJust a few short weeks ago, dimethyl fumarate was approved in Europe as a basic therapy for multiple sclerosis. Although its efficacy has been established in clinical studies, its underlying mode of action was still unknown, but scientists from Bad Nauheim’s Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research and the Univ. of Lübeck have now managed to decode it. They hope that this knowledge will help them develop more effective therapeutic agents.Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that affects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord by damaging their protective myelin sheath. The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown and the disease has no cure to date, but a range of treatments are available that can have a positive influence on its course.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/research-uncovers-mode-action-new-ms-drug

    Research Uncovers Mode of Action on New MS Drug

    Just a few short weeks ago, dimethyl fumarate was approved in Europe as a basic therapy for multiple sclerosis. Although its efficacy has been established in clinical studies, its underlying mode of action was still unknown, but scientists from Bad Nauheim’s Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research and the Univ. of Lübeck have now managed to decode it. They hope that this knowledge will help them develop more effective therapeutic agents.

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that affects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord by damaging their protective myelin sheath. The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown and the disease has no cure to date, but a range of treatments are available that can have a positive influence on its course.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/research-uncovers-mode-action-new-ms-drug

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  13. Nanoballoons, Lasers Team to Fight CancerChemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they’re not so efficient at getting where they need to go. They often interact with blood, bone marrow and other healthy bodily systems. This dilutes the drugs and causes unwanted side effects.Now, researchers are developing a better delivery method by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons, tiny modified liposomes that — upon being struck by a red laser — pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoballoons-lasers-team-fight-cancer

    Nanoballoons, Lasers Team to Fight Cancer

    Chemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they’re not so efficient at getting where they need to go. They often interact with blood, bone marrow and other healthy bodily systems. This dilutes the drugs and causes unwanted side effects.

    Now, researchers are developing a better delivery method by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons, tiny modified liposomes that — upon being struck by a red laser — pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoballoons-lasers-team-fight-cancer

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  15. Nanoparticles Force Cancer to Self-destructUsing magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumor cells to self-destruct sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund Univ.“The clever thing about the technique is that we can target selected cells without harming surrounding tissue. There are many ways to kill cells, but this method is contained and remote-controlled,” says Prof. Erik Renström.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoparticles-force-cancer-self-destruct

    Nanoparticles Force Cancer to Self-destruct

    Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumor cells to self-destruct sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund Univ.

    “The clever thing about the technique is that we can target selected cells without harming surrounding tissue. There are many ways to kill cells, but this method is contained and remote-controlled,” says Prof. Erik Renström.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoparticles-force-cancer-self-destruct

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  17. Light-heated Water Can Deliver DrugsResearchers from UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with material scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body.This discovery represents a major innovation, says Adah Almutairi, associate professor and director of the joint UC San Diego-KACST Center of Excellence in Nanomedicine. Up to now, she says, only a handful of strategies using light-triggered release from nanoparticles have been reported.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/light-heated-water-can-deliver-drugs

    Light-heated Water Can Deliver Drugs

    Researchers from UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with material scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body.

    This discovery represents a major innovation, says Adah Almutairi, associate professor and director of the joint UC San Diego-KACST Center of Excellence in Nanomedicine. Up to now, she says, only a handful of strategies using light-triggered release from nanoparticles have been reported.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/light-heated-water-can-deliver-drugs

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  19. Correcting Mutation Cures Liver Disorder in MiceUsing a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder caused by a single genetic mutation.The findings, described in Nature Biotechnology, offer the first evidence that this gene-editing technique, known as CRISPR, can reverse disease symptoms in living animals. CRISPR, which offers an easy way to snip out mutated DNA and replace it with the correct sequence, holds potential for treating many genetic disorders, according to the research team.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/correcting-mutation-cures-liver-disorder-mice

    Correcting Mutation Cures Liver Disorder in Mice

    Using a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder caused by a single genetic mutation.

    The findings, described in Nature Biotechnology, offer the first evidence that this gene-editing technique, known as CRISPR, can reverse disease symptoms in living animals. CRISPR, which offers an easy way to snip out mutated DNA and replace it with the correct sequence, holds potential for treating many genetic disorders, according to the research team.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/correcting-mutation-cures-liver-disorder-mice

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  21. Vitamin A May Reverse Pre-cancerous Cells

    A derivative of vitamin A, known as retinoic acid, found abundantly in sweet potato and carrots, helps turn pre-cancer cells back to normal healthy breast cells, according to research published this month in the International Journal of Oncology. The research could help explain why some clinical studies have been unable to see a benefit of vitamin A on cancer: the vitamin doesn’t appear to change the course of full-blown cancer, only pre-cancerous cells, and only works at a very narrow dose.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/vitamin-may-reverse-pre-cancerous-cells

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  23. Reports of Test for Alzheimer’s May Be PrematureThe media are always fascinated by medical “breakthrough” stories: tales of hope that scientists have found cures for our most threatening diseases and tales of woe that our lifestyles are doing us harm. All too often these stories portray the underlying science as conclusive, when at best it is speculative.Uncertainty does not grab headlines. Successful careers are being forged by our more numerate journalists in dissecting the overblown claims – for example the Guardian’s Bad Science column and Radio 4’s More or Less provide expositions of the lack of substance in these stories, often through detailed examination of the statistical evidence. The Royal Statistical Society champions good statistical reporting, presenting annual awards for Statistical Excellence in Journalism.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/reports-test-alzheimer%E2%80%99s-may-be-premature

    Reports of Test for Alzheimer’s May Be Premature

    The media are always fascinated by medical “breakthrough” stories: tales of hope that scientists have found cures for our most threatening diseases and tales of woe that our lifestyles are doing us harm. All too often these stories portray the underlying science as conclusive, when at best it is speculative.

    Uncertainty does not grab headlines. Successful careers are being forged by our more numerate journalists in dissecting the overblown claims – for example the Guardian’s Bad Science column and Radio 4’s More or Less provide expositions of the lack of substance in these stories, often through detailed examination of the statistical evidence. The Royal Statistical Society champions good statistical reporting, presenting annual awards for Statistical Excellence in Journalism.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/reports-test-alzheimer%E2%80%99s-may-be-premature

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  25. Nasal Filter Holds Promise for Allergy SufferersA small filter the size of a contact lens could possibly make life easier for some of the estimated 500 million people worldwide who suffer from itching, sneezing and a runny nose as soon as the pollen season starts.A clinical study from Aarhus Univ. concludes that a newly developed Danish mini-filter — Rhinix — appears to be significantly more effective against the discomfort of seasonal hay fever than a filter-less placebo.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/nasal-filter-holds-promise-allergy-sufferers

    Nasal Filter Holds Promise for Allergy Sufferers

    A small filter the size of a contact lens could possibly make life easier for some of the estimated 500 million people worldwide who suffer from itching, sneezing and a runny nose as soon as the pollen season starts.

    A clinical study from Aarhus Univ. concludes that a newly developed Danish mini-filter — Rhinix — appears to be significantly more effective against the discomfort of seasonal hay fever than a filter-less placebo.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/nasal-filter-holds-promise-allergy-sufferers

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  27. Stem Cell Injections Reduce Low Back Pain

    A single injection of stem cells into degenerative discs reduced low back pain for at least 12 months, according to results of a 100-patient, phase II, international clinical trial that included researchers at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center.

    W. Jeremy Beckworth, assistant professor of Orthopaedics and Rehab Medicine, was part of the trial that used injections of bone marrow stem cells called mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) to reduce pain. On average researchers found a pain reduction greater than 50 percent at 12 months. Additionally, there was less need for pain medication, improvement in function and less need for further surgical and non-surgical spine interventions. These results were found in patients with moderate to severe discogenic low back pain.

    Read mroe: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/02/stem-cell-injections-reduce-low-back-pain

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  29. Fast, Effective Mechanism Combats Aggressive CancerOvarian cancer accounts for more deaths of American women than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. According to the American Cancer Society, one in 72 American women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and one in 100 will ultimately die of the condition.Now Prof. Dan Peer of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Cell Research and Immunology has proposed a new strategy to tackle an aggressive subtype of ovarian cancer using a new nanoscale drug delivery system designed to target specific cancer cells. He and his team — Keren Cohen and Rafi Emmanuel from Peer’s Laboratory of Nanomedicine and Einat Kisin-Finfer and Doron Shabbat, from TAU’s Department of Chemistry — have devised a cluster of nanoparticles called gagomers, made of fats and coated with a kind of polysugar. When filled with chemotherapy drugs, these clusters accumulate in tumors, producing dramatically therapeutic benefits.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/fast-effective-mechanism-combats-aggressive-cancer

    Fast, Effective Mechanism Combats Aggressive Cancer

    Ovarian cancer accounts for more deaths of American women than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. According to the American Cancer Society, one in 72 American women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and one in 100 will ultimately die of the condition.

    Now Prof. Dan Peer of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Cell Research and Immunology has proposed a new strategy to tackle an aggressive subtype of ovarian cancer using a new nanoscale drug delivery system designed to target specific cancer cells. He and his team — Keren Cohen and Rafi Emmanuel from Peer’s Laboratory of Nanomedicine and Einat Kisin-Finfer and Doron Shabbat, from TAU’s Department of Chemistry — have devised a cluster of nanoparticles called gagomers, made of fats and coated with a kind of polysugar. When filled with chemotherapy drugs, these clusters accumulate in tumors, producing dramatically therapeutic benefits.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/fast-effective-mechanism-combats-aggressive-cancer

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