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  1. Study Suggests New Target for Heart DrugsSome of the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of heart failure are beta-blockers and nitrates, which help to relax blood vessels and decrease the heart’s workload. The drugs were thought to produce those effects through distinct molecular pathways, but according to a new study led by scientists at Temple Univ. School of Medicine, both types of drugs may help the failing heart by counteracting the effects of an enzyme known as GRK2. The findings suggest that new drugs aimed specifically at GRK2, which can trigger the death of heart cells, could protect the heart from progressive disease.The study, which appears online in the journal Science Signaling, describes a previously uncharacterized interaction between GRK2 and an enzyme called endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), in which the two enzymes attempt to block one another’s activity, with different outcomes on heart function.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/study-suggests-new-target-heart-drugs

    Study Suggests New Target for Heart Drugs

    Some of the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of heart failure are beta-blockers and nitrates, which help to relax blood vessels and decrease the heart’s workload. The drugs were thought to produce those effects through distinct molecular pathways, but according to a new study led by scientists at Temple Univ. School of Medicine, both types of drugs may help the failing heart by counteracting the effects of an enzyme known as GRK2. The findings suggest that new drugs aimed specifically at GRK2, which can trigger the death of heart cells, could protect the heart from progressive disease.

    The study, which appears online in the journal Science Signaling, describes a previously uncharacterized interaction between GRK2 and an enzyme called endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), in which the two enzymes attempt to block one another’s activity, with different outcomes on heart function.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/study-suggests-new-target-heart-drugs

  2. 19 Notes
  3. X-rays Pinpoint Drug Target for Stomach UlcersExperiments at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have revealed a potential new way to attack common stomach bacteria that cause ulcers and significantly increase the odds of developing stomach cancer.The breakthrough, made using powerful X-rays from SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), was the culmination of five years of research into the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is so tough it can live in strong stomach acid. At least half the world’s population carries H. pylori and hundreds of millions suffer health problems as a result; current treatments require a complicated regimen of stomach-acid inhibitors and antibiotics.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/x-rays-pinpoint-drug-target-stomach-ulcers

    X-rays Pinpoint Drug Target for Stomach Ulcers

    Experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have revealed a potential new way to attack common stomach bacteria that cause ulcers and significantly increase the odds of developing stomach cancer.

    The breakthrough, made using powerful X-rays from SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), was the culmination of five years of research into the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is so tough it can live in strong stomach acid. At least half the world’s population carries H. pylori and hundreds of millions suffer health problems as a result; current treatments require a complicated regimen of stomach-acid inhibitors and antibiotics.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/x-rays-pinpoint-drug-target-stomach-ulcers

  4. 69 Notes