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  1. Sun May Lower Blood PressureExposing skin to sunlight may help to reduce blood pressure and thus cut the risk of heart attack and stroke, a study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology suggests.Research carried out at the Universities of Southampton and Edinburgh shows that sunlight alters levels of the small messenger molecule, nitric oxide (NO) in the skin and blood, reducing blood pressure.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/sun-may-lower-blood-pressure

    Sun May Lower Blood Pressure

    Exposing skin to sunlight may help to reduce blood pressure and thus cut the risk of heart attack and stroke, a study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology suggests.

    Research carried out at the Universities of Southampton and Edinburgh shows that sunlight alters levels of the small messenger molecule, nitric oxide (NO) in the skin and blood, reducing blood pressure.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/sun-may-lower-blood-pressure

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  3. Antioxidant Keeps Skin Younger for Longer

    Newcastle Univ. researchers have identified an antioxidant, Tiron, that offers total protection against some types of sun damage and may ultimately help our skin stay looking younger for longer.

    Publishing in The FASEB Journal, the authors describe how in laboratory tests, they compared the protection offered against either UVA radiation or free radical stress by several antioxidants, some of which are found in foods or cosmetics. While UVB radiation easily causes sunburn, UVA radiation penetrates deeper, damaging our DNA by generating free radicals which degrades the collagen that gives skin its elastic quality.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/antioxidant-keeps-skin-younger-longer

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  5. Researchers Improve Safety of Cosmetic, Sunscreen IngredientUsing a particular type of titanium dioxide — a common ingredient in cosmetics, food products, toothpaste and sunscreen — could reduce the potential health risks associated with the widely used compound. The report on the substance, produced by the millions of tons every year for the global market, appears in the ACS journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.Francesco Turci and colleagues at Univ. of Torino explain that titanium dioxide (TiO2) is generally considered a safe ingredient in commercially available skin products because it doesn’t penetrate healthy skin. But there’s a catch. Research has shown that TiO2 can cause potentially toxic effects when exposed to ultraviolet light, which is in the sun’s rays and is the same kind of light that the compound is supposed to offer protection against. To design a safer TiO2 for human use, the researchers set out to test different forms of the compound, each with its own architecture.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/researchers-improve-safety-cosmetic-sunscreen-ingredient

    Researchers Improve Safety of Cosmetic, Sunscreen Ingredient

    Using a particular type of titanium dioxide — a common ingredient in cosmetics, food products, toothpaste and sunscreen — could reduce the potential health risks associated with the widely used compound. The report on the substance, produced by the millions of tons every year for the global market, appears in the ACS journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

    Francesco Turci and colleagues at Univ. of Torino explain that titanium dioxide (TiO2) is generally considered a safe ingredient in commercially available skin products because it doesn’t penetrate healthy skin. But there’s a catch. Research has shown that TiO2 can cause potentially toxic effects when exposed to ultraviolet light, which is in the sun’s rays and is the same kind of light that the compound is supposed to offer protection against. To design a safer TiO2 for human use, the researchers set out to test different forms of the compound, each with its own architecture.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/researchers-improve-safety-cosmetic-sunscreen-ingredient

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  7. Patch Delivers Drugs Directly Through Skin

    An assistant professor with the Virginia Tech — Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering has developed a flexible microneedle patch that allows drugs to be delivered directly and fully through the skin. The new patch can quicken drug delivery time while cutting waste, and can likely minimize side-effects in some cases, notable in vaccinations and cancer therapy.

    News of the delivery technology was published in a recent issue of the scientific journal, Advanced Materials. Leading development of the flexible patch was Lissett Bickford, now an assistant professor and researcher of biomedical engineering and the mechanical engineering, both part of the Virginia Tech College of Engineering.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/patch-delivers-drugs-directly-through-skin

  8. 20 Notes
  9. Biosensor Warns Athletes of Imminent ExhaustionA new biosensor, applied to the human skin like a temporary tattoo, can alert marathoners, competitive bikers and other “extreme” athletes that they’re about to “bonk,” or “hit the wall,” scientists are reporting. The study, in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, describes the first human tests of the sensor, which also could help soldiers and others who engage in intense exercise — and their trainers — monitor stamina and fitness.Joseph Wang and colleagues, from UC San Diego, explain that the sensor monitors lactate, a form of lactic acid released in sweat. Lactate forms when the muscles need more energy than the body can supply from the “aerobic” respiration that suffices during mild exercise. The body shifts to “anaerobic” metabolism, producing lactic acid and lactate. That helps for a while, but lactate builds up in the body, causing extreme fatigue and the infamous “bonking out,” where an athlete just cannot continue.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/biosensor-warns-athletes-imminent-exhaustion

    Biosensor Warns Athletes of Imminent Exhaustion

    A new biosensor, applied to the human skin like a temporary tattoo, can alert marathoners, competitive bikers and other “extreme” athletes that they’re about to “bonk,” or “hit the wall,” scientists are reporting. The study, in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, describes the first human tests of the sensor, which also could help soldiers and others who engage in intense exercise — and their trainers — monitor stamina and fitness.

    Joseph Wang and colleagues, from UC San Diego, explain that the sensor monitors lactate, a form of lactic acid released in sweat. Lactate forms when the muscles need more energy than the body can supply from the “aerobic” respiration that suffices during mild exercise. The body shifts to “anaerobic” metabolism, producing lactic acid and lactate. That helps for a while, but lactate builds up in the body, causing extreme fatigue and the infamous “bonking out,” where an athlete just cannot continue.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/biosensor-warns-athletes-imminent-exhaustion

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  11. Gold Makes Sensors for Artificial Skin

    Using tiny gold particles and a kind of resin, a team of scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology has discovered how to make a new kind of flexible sensor that one day could be integrated into electronic skin, or e-skin. If scientists learn how to attach e-skin to prosthetic limbs, people with amputations might once again be able to feel changes in their environments. The findings appear in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

    The secret lies in the sensor’s ability to detect three kinds of data simultaneously. While current kinds of e-skin detect only touch, the Technion team’s invention “can simultaneously sense touch, humidity and temperature, as real skin can do,” says research team leader Prof. Hossam Haick. Additionally, the new system “is at least 10 times more sensitive in touch than the currently existing touch-based e-skin systems.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/gold-makes-sensors-artificial-skin

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  13. Measuring Skin Vibrations May Aid Wearable Tactile DisplaysIn the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right, left or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/measuring-skin-vibrations-may-aid-wearable-tactile-displays

    Measuring Skin Vibrations May Aid Wearable Tactile Displays

    In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.

    Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right, left or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/measuring-skin-vibrations-may-aid-wearable-tactile-displays

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  15. Sunscreen Slows Skin AgingIf worry about skin cancer doesn’t make you slather on sunscreen, maybe vanity will: New research provides some of the strongest evidence to date that near-daily sunscreen use can slow the aging of your skin.Ultraviolet rays that spur wrinkles and other signs of aging can quietly build up damage pretty much anytime you’re in the sun — a lunchtime stroll, school recess, walking the dog — and they even penetrate car windows.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/sunscreen-slows-skin-aging

    Sunscreen Slows Skin Aging

    If worry about skin cancer doesn’t make you slather on sunscreen, maybe vanity will: New research provides some of the strongest evidence to date that near-daily sunscreen use can slow the aging of your skin.

    Ultraviolet rays that spur wrinkles and other signs of aging can quietly build up damage pretty much anytime you’re in the sun — a lunchtime stroll, school recess, walking the dog — and they even penetrate car windows.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/sunscreen-slows-skin-aging

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  17. Scientist of the Week: Richard WellerEvery Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Richard Weller from Univ. of Edinburgh. He and a team found that sunlight can be beneficial to health and exposing skin to sunlight may help to reduce blood pressure and cut the risk of heart attacks and strokes.The original article can be found here: www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/sunshine-can-benefit-overall-healthHe speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/scientist-week-richard-wellerHave a question for Richard Weller? Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

    Scientist of the Week: Richard Weller

    Every Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Richard Weller from Univ. of Edinburgh. He and a team found that sunlight can be beneficial to health and exposing skin to sunlight may help to reduce blood pressure and cut the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

    The original article can be found here: www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/sunshine-can-benefit-overall-health

    He speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/scientist-week-richard-weller

    Have a question for Richard Weller? Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

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  19. Fungus on Human Skin is Highly DiverseWhile humans have harnessed the power of yeast to ferment bread and beer, the function of yeast or other types of fungi that live in and on the human body is not well understood. In the first study of human fungal skin diversity, National Institutes of Health researchers sequenced the DNA of fungi at skin sites of healthy adults to define the normal populations across the skin and to provide a framework for investigating fungal skin conditions.Human skin surfaces are complex ecosystems for microorganisms, including fungi, bacteria and viruses, which are known collectively as the skin microbiome. Although fungal infections of the skin affect about 29 million people in the U.S., fungi can be slow and hard to grow in laboratories, complicating diagnosis and treatment of even the most common fungal skin conditions, such as toenail infections.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/fungus-human-skin-highly-diverse

    Fungus on Human Skin is Highly Diverse

    While humans have harnessed the power of yeast to ferment bread and beer, the function of yeast or other types of fungi that live in and on the human body is not well understood. In the first study of human fungal skin diversity, National Institutes of Health researchers sequenced the DNA of fungi at skin sites of healthy adults to define the normal populations across the skin and to provide a framework for investigating fungal skin conditions.

    Human skin surfaces are complex ecosystems for microorganisms, including fungi, bacteria and viruses, which are known collectively as the skin microbiome. Although fungal infections of the skin affect about 29 million people in the U.S., fungi can be slow and hard to grow in laboratories, complicating diagnosis and treatment of even the most common fungal skin conditions, such as toenail infections.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/fungus-human-skin-highly-diverse

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  21. High SPF Ratings on Sunscreen are MisleadingSunbathers headed to the beach this summer will find new sunscreen labels on store shelves that are designed to make the products more effective and easier to use. But despite those long-awaited changes, many sunscreens continue to carry SPF ratings that some experts consider misleading and potentially dangerous, according to a consumer watchdog group.A survey of 1,400 sunscreen products by the Environmental Working Group finds that most products meet new federal requirements put in place last December. The rules from the Food and Drug Administration ban terms like “waterproof,” which regulators consider misleading, and require that sunscreens filter out both ultraviolet A and B rays. Previously some products only blocked UVB rays, which cause most sunburn, while providing little protection against UVA rays that pose the greatest risk of skin cancer and wrinkles.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/high-spf-ratings-sunscreen-are-misleading

    High SPF Ratings on Sunscreen are Misleading

    Sunbathers headed to the beach this summer will find new sunscreen labels on store shelves that are designed to make the products more effective and easier to use. But despite those long-awaited changes, many sunscreens continue to carry SPF ratings that some experts consider misleading and potentially dangerous, according to a consumer watchdog group.

    A survey of 1,400 sunscreen products by the Environmental Working Group finds that most products meet new federal requirements put in place last December. The rules from the Food and Drug Administration ban terms like “waterproof,” which regulators consider misleading, and require that sunscreens filter out both ultraviolet A and B rays. Previously some products only blocked UVB rays, which cause most sunburn, while providing little protection against UVA rays that pose the greatest risk of skin cancer and wrinkles.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/high-spf-ratings-sunscreen-are-misleading

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  23. Paper-Thin Flexible ‘Skin’ Monitors Heart HealthMost of us don’t ponder our pulses outside of the gym. But doctors use the human pulse as a diagnostic tool to monitor heart health.Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford, has developed a heart monitor thinner than a dollar bill and no wider than a postage stamp. The flexible skin-like monitor, worn under an adhesive bandage on the wrist, is sensitive enough to help doctors detect stiff arteries and cardiovascular problems.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/paper-thin-flexible-skin-monitors-heart-health

    Paper-Thin Flexible ‘Skin’ Monitors Heart Health

    Most of us don’t ponder our pulses outside of the gym. But doctors use the human pulse as a diagnostic tool to monitor heart health.

    Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford, has developed a heart monitor thinner than a dollar bill and no wider than a postage stamp. The flexible skin-like monitor, worn under an adhesive bandage on the wrist, is sensitive enough to help doctors detect stiff arteries and cardiovascular problems.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/paper-thin-flexible-skin-monitors-heart-health

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  25. FDA Calls for Cancer Warnings on Tanning BedsIndoor tanning beds would come with new warnings about the risk of cancer and be subject to more stringent federal oversight under a proposal unveiled by the Food and Drug Administration.The FDA has regulated tanning beds and sun lamps for over 30 years, but for the first time ever the agency says those devices should not be used by people under age 18. The agency wants that warning on pamphlets, catalogues and websites that promote indoor tanning. And regulators are also proposing that manufacturers meet certain safety and design requirements, including timers and limits on radiation emitted.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/fda-calls-cancer-warnings-tanning-beds

    FDA Calls for Cancer Warnings on Tanning Beds

    Indoor tanning beds would come with new warnings about the risk of cancer and be subject to more stringent federal oversight under a proposal unveiled by the Food and Drug Administration.

    The FDA has regulated tanning beds and sun lamps for over 30 years, but for the first time ever the agency says those devices should not be used by people under age 18. The agency wants that warning on pamphlets, catalogues and websites that promote indoor tanning. And regulators are also proposing that manufacturers meet certain safety and design requirements, including timers and limits on radiation emitted.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/fda-calls-cancer-warnings-tanning-beds

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  27. Food, Skin Allergies on the Rise in ChildrenParents are reporting more skin and food allergies in their children, a big government survey found.Experts aren’t sure what’s behind the increase. Could it be that children are growing up in households so clean that it leaves them more sensitive to things that can trigger allergies? Or are mom and dad paying closer attention to rashes and reactions, and more likely to call it an allergy?Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/food-skin-allergies-rise-children

    Food, Skin Allergies on the Rise in Children

    Parents are reporting more skin and food allergies in their children, a big government survey found.

    Experts aren’t sure what’s behind the increase. Could it be that children are growing up in households so clean that it leaves them more sensitive to things that can trigger allergies? Or are mom and dad paying closer attention to rashes and reactions, and more likely to call it an allergy?

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/food-skin-allergies-rise-children

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  29. 'Spider Skin' Captures Grand Prize in Image ContestFEI is proud to announce that María Carbajo of the Electron Microscopy Unit in the Research Support Services of the Univ. of Extremadura has been awarded the grand prize in the 2012 FEI Owner Image Contest for her entry “Spider Skin.”FEI.com visitors were asked to vote for their favorite image among the monthly winners. A total of nearly 1,000 votes were received and María Carbajo’s image, Spider Skin, narrowly beat out other worthy images.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/spider-skin-captures-grand-prize-image-contest

    'Spider Skin' Captures Grand Prize in Image Contest

    FEI is proud to announce that María Carbajo of the Electron Microscopy Unit in the Research Support Services of the Univ. of Extremadura has been awarded the grand prize in the 2012 FEI Owner Image Contest for her entry “Spider Skin.”

    FEI.com visitors were asked to vote for their favorite image among the monthly winners. A total of nearly 1,000 votes were received and María Carbajo’s image, Spider Skin, narrowly beat out other worthy images.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/spider-skin-captures-grand-prize-image-contest

  30. 1781 Notes