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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Nasal Filter Holds Promise for Allergy SufferersA small filter the size of a contact lens could possibly make life easier for some of the estimated 500 million people worldwide who suffer from itching, sneezing and a runny nose as soon as the pollen season starts.A clinical study from Aarhus Univ. concludes that a newly developed Danish mini-filter — Rhinix — appears to be significantly more effective against the discomfort of seasonal hay fever than a filter-less placebo.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/nasal-filter-holds-promise-allergy-sufferers

    Nasal Filter Holds Promise for Allergy Sufferers

    A small filter the size of a contact lens could possibly make life easier for some of the estimated 500 million people worldwide who suffer from itching, sneezing and a runny nose as soon as the pollen season starts.

    A clinical study from Aarhus Univ. concludes that a newly developed Danish mini-filter — Rhinix — appears to be significantly more effective against the discomfort of seasonal hay fever than a filter-less placebo.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/nasal-filter-holds-promise-allergy-sufferers

  2. 39 Notes
  3. HIV Prevention Drug Shows PromiseExciting research suggests that a shot every one to three months may someday give an alternative to the daily pills that some people take now to cut their risk of getting HIV.The experimental drug has only been tested for prevention in monkeys, but it completely protected them from infection in two studies reported at an AIDS conference.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/hiv-prevention-drug-shows-promise

    HIV Prevention Drug Shows Promise

    Exciting research suggests that a shot every one to three months may someday give an alternative to the daily pills that some people take now to cut their risk of getting HIV.

    The experimental drug has only been tested for prevention in monkeys, but it completely protected them from infection in two studies reported at an AIDS conference.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/hiv-prevention-drug-shows-promise

  4. 24 Notes
  5. More Spending on Fire Suppression Linked to Bigger FiresThe “firefighting trap” is a term often used by business managers to describe a shortsighted cycle of problem-solving: dealing with “fires,” or problems, as they arise, but failing to address the underlying cause, thereby increasing the chance that the same problem will crop up in the future.Researchers at MIT’s Engineering Systems Division have now looked at the original inspiration for this “quick-fix” management strategy: firefighting itself. They combined regional fire data, such as the number of fires and the amount of land burned per year, with interviews conducted with fire managers, policymakers and academics to draw up a model illustrating the relationships that contribute to forest-fire management.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/more-spending-fire-suppression-linked-bigger-fires

    More Spending on Fire Suppression Linked to Bigger Fires

    The “firefighting trap” is a term often used by business managers to describe a shortsighted cycle of problem-solving: dealing with “fires,” or problems, as they arise, but failing to address the underlying cause, thereby increasing the chance that the same problem will crop up in the future.

    Researchers at MIT’s Engineering Systems Division have now looked at the original inspiration for this “quick-fix” management strategy: firefighting itself. They combined regional fire data, such as the number of fires and the amount of land burned per year, with interviews conducted with fire managers, policymakers and academics to draw up a model illustrating the relationships that contribute to forest-fire management.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/more-spending-fire-suppression-linked-bigger-fires

  6. 16 Notes
  7. Polymer Could Halt HIV TransmissionA precisely designed macromolecule that mimics the binding of HIV to immune system cells could be used to stop the virus from physically entering the body, according to a new study led by a materials scientist at Queen Mary Univ. of London.The researchers created the large molecule with several sugar molecules, known as glycopolymers. By using different sugars attached to the macromolecule in solution, the scientists were able to investigate which sugar molecules were the most effective in inhibiting the potential binding of the virus.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/polymer-could-halt-hiv-transmission

    Polymer Could Halt HIV Transmission

    A precisely designed macromolecule that mimics the binding of HIV to immune system cells could be used to stop the virus from physically entering the body, according to a new study led by a materials scientist at Queen Mary Univ. of London.

    The researchers created the large molecule with several sugar molecules, known as glycopolymers. By using different sugars attached to the macromolecule in solution, the scientists were able to investigate which sugar molecules were the most effective in inhibiting the potential binding of the virus.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/polymer-could-halt-hiv-transmission

  8. 76 Notes
  9. New Gel-Growing Method Yields Cancer Prevention Clues

    The news a cancer patient most fears is that the disease has spread and become much more difficult to treat. A new method to isolate and grow the most dangerous cancer cells could enable new research into how cancer spreads and, ultimately, how to fight it.

    Univ. of Illinois researchers, in collaboration with scientists at the Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology in China, published their results in the journal Nature Materials.

    Read more:http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-New-Way-to-Grow-Isolate-Cells-Can-Block-Cancer-Progression-070312.aspx?xmlmenuid=51

  10. 7 Notes
  11. Cooling Eggs Doubles Shelf Life, Reduces Illness

    Taking just a few seconds to cool freshly laid eggs would add weeks to their shelf life, according to a Purdue Univ. study.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-cooling-eggs-can-double-shelf-life-reduce-illness-061212.aspx?et_cid=2693392&et_rid=422327952&linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.laboratoryequipment.com%2fnews-cooling-eggs-can-double-shelf-life-reduce-illness-061212.aspx

  12. 2 Notes
  13. Sunlight Can Prevent, Treat Heart Attacks

    There are lots of ways to treat a heart attack — CPR, aspirin, clot-busters and more. Now Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine researchers have found a new candidate: intense light.

    "The study suggests that strong light, or even just daylight, might ease the risk of having a heart attack or suffering damage from one," says Tobias Eckle, an associate professor of anesthesiology, cardiology, and cell and developmental biology at the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine. "For patients, this could mean that daylight exposure inside of the hospital could reduce the damage that is caused by a heart attack."

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Sunlight-Can-Prevent-Treat-Heart-Attacks-042612.aspx

  14. 9 Notes
  15. Treatment Prevents Blindness with Half the AntibioticsUCSF study shows a popular treatment for a potentially blinding eye infection is just as effective if given every six months versus annually. This randomized study on trachoma, the leading cause of infection-caused blindness in the world, could potentially treat twice the number of patients using the same amount of medication.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Treatment-prevents-Blindness-with-Half-the-Antibiotics-122211.aspx

    Treatment Prevents Blindness with Half the Antibiotics

    UCSF study shows a popular treatment for a potentially blinding eye infection is just as effective if given every six months versus annually. This randomized study on trachoma, the leading cause of infection-caused blindness in the world, could potentially treat twice the number of patients using the same amount of medication.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Treatment-prevents-Blindness-with-Half-the-Antibiotics-122211.aspx

  16. 8 Notes