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  1. Discovery Suggests New Uses for Common BubblesAnyone who has ever had a glass of fizzy soda knows that bubbles can throw tiny particles into the air. But in a finding with wide industrial applications, Princeton researchers have demonstrated that the bursting bubbles push some particles down into the liquid as well."It is well known that bursting bubbles produce aerosol droplets, so we were surprised, and fascinated, to discover that when we covered the water with oil, the same process injected tiny oil droplets into the water," said Howard Stone, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton and the lead researcher for the project.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/discovery-suggests-new-uses-common-bubbles

    Discovery Suggests New Uses for Common Bubbles

    Anyone who has ever had a glass of fizzy soda knows that bubbles can throw tiny particles into the air. But in a finding with wide industrial applications, Princeton researchers have demonstrated that the bursting bubbles push some particles down into the liquid as well.

    "It is well known that bursting bubbles produce aerosol droplets, so we were surprised, and fascinated, to discover that when we covered the water with oil, the same process injected tiny oil droplets into the water," said Howard Stone, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton and the lead researcher for the project.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/discovery-suggests-new-uses-common-bubbles

  2. 24 Notes
  3. 'Lightning Rods' Channel Electricity Through AirBy zapping the air with a pair of powerful laser bursts, researchers at the Univ. of Arizona have created highly focused pathways that can channel electricity through the atmosphere.The technique can potentially direct an electrical discharge up to 33 feet away or more, shattering previous distance records for transmitting electricity through air. It also raises the intriguing possibility of one day channeling lightning with laser power.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/lightning-rods-channel-electricity-through-air

    'Lightning Rods' Channel Electricity Through Air

    By zapping the air with a pair of powerful laser bursts, researchers at the Univ. of Arizona have created highly focused pathways that can channel electricity through the atmosphere.

    The technique can potentially direct an electrical discharge up to 33 feet away or more, shattering previous distance records for transmitting electricity through air. It also raises the intriguing possibility of one day channeling lightning with laser power.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/lightning-rods-channel-electricity-through-air

  4. 74 Notes
  5. Fewer Shakes from Manmade QuakesManmade earthquakes, a side effect of some high-tech energy drilling, cause less shaking and in general are about 16 times weaker than natural earthquakes with the same magnitude, a new federal study found.People feeling the ground move from induced quakes — those that are not natural, but triggered by injections of wastewater deep underground— report significantly less shaking than those who experience more normal earthquakes of the same magnitude, according to a study by U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Susan Hough.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/fewer-shakes-manmade-quakes

    Fewer Shakes from Manmade Quakes

    Manmade earthquakes, a side effect of some high-tech energy drilling, cause less shaking and in general are about 16 times weaker than natural earthquakes with the same magnitude, a new federal study found.

    People feeling the ground move from induced quakes — those that are not natural, but triggered by injections of wastewater deep underground— report significantly less shaking than those who experience more normal earthquakes of the same magnitude, according to a study by U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Susan Hough.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/fewer-shakes-manmade-quakes

  6. 6 Notes
  7. New Tech Studies Small Clusters of AtomsPhysicists at the Univ. of York, working with researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Genoa, have developed new technology to study atomic vibration in small particles, revealing a more accurate picture of the structure of atomic clusters where surface atoms vibrate more intensively than internal atoms.Using new computer technology based on gaming machines, scientists were able to use a combination of molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations to simulate the electron microscopy of gold particles. By modelling the atomic vibration of individual atoms in such clusters realistically, external atoms on the surface of the structure can be seen to vibrate more than internal atoms.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/new-tech-studies-small-clusters-atoms

    New Tech Studies Small Clusters of Atoms

    Physicists at the Univ. of York, working with researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Genoa, have developed new technology to study atomic vibration in small particles, revealing a more accurate picture of the structure of atomic clusters where surface atoms vibrate more intensively than internal atoms.

    Using new computer technology based on gaming machines, scientists were able to use a combination of molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations to simulate the electron microscopy of gold particles. By modelling the atomic vibration of individual atoms in such clusters realistically, external atoms on the surface of the structure can be seen to vibrate more than internal atoms.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/new-tech-studies-small-clusters-atoms

  8. 30 Notes
  9. Laser Makes Cooler MicroscopeLaser physicists have found a way to make atomic force microscope probes 20 times more sensitive and capable of detecting forces as small as the weight of an individual virus.The technique, developed by researchers in the Quantum Optics Group of the Australian National Univ.’s Research School of Physics and Engineering, hinges on using laser beams to cool a nanowire probe to -265 C.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/laser-makes-cooler-microscope

    Laser Makes Cooler Microscope

    Laser physicists have found a way to make atomic force microscope probes 20 times more sensitive and capable of detecting forces as small as the weight of an individual virus.

    The technique, developed by researchers in the Quantum Optics Group of the Australian National Univ.’s Research School of Physics and Engineering, hinges on using laser beams to cool a nanowire probe to -265 C.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/laser-makes-cooler-microscope

  10. 24 Notes
  11. Beetle Inspires Whiter Paper, Plastics, PaintsThe physical properties of the ultra-white scales on certain species of beetle could be used to make whiter paper, plastics and paints, while using far less material than is used in current manufacturing methods.The Cyphochilus beetle, which is native to South-East Asia, is whiter than paper, thanks to ultra-thin scales that cover its body. A new investigation of the optical properties of these scales has shown that they are able to scatter light more efficiently than any other biological tissue known, which is how they are able to achieve such a bright whiteness.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/beetle-inspires-whiter-paper-plastics-paints

    Beetle Inspires Whiter Paper, Plastics, Paints

    The physical properties of the ultra-white scales on certain species of beetle could be used to make whiter paper, plastics and paints, while using far less material than is used in current manufacturing methods.

    The Cyphochilus beetle, which is native to South-East Asia, is whiter than paper, thanks to ultra-thin scales that cover its body. A new investigation of the optical properties of these scales has shown that they are able to scatter light more efficiently than any other biological tissue known, which is how they are able to achieve such a bright whiteness.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/beetle-inspires-whiter-paper-plastics-paints

  12. 28 Notes
  13. Higgs Boson May Explain Earliest Expansion of the Universe Fedor Bezrukov from the RIKEN BNL Research Center and Mikhail Shaposhnikov from EPFL propose that the Higgs boson may be responsible for the mode of inflation and shape of the Universe shortly after the Big Bang.“There is an intriguing connection between the world explored in particle accelerators today and the earliest moments of the existence of the Universe,” explained Bezrukov.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/higgs-boson-may-explain-earliest-expansion-universe

    Higgs Boson May Explain Earliest Expansion of the Universe

    Fedor Bezrukov from the RIKEN BNL Research Center and Mikhail Shaposhnikov from EPFL propose that the Higgs boson may be responsible for the mode of inflation and shape of the Universe shortly after the Big Bang.

    “There is an intriguing connection between the world explored in particle accelerators today and the earliest moments of the existence of the Universe,” explained Bezrukov.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/higgs-boson-may-explain-earliest-expansion-universe

  14. 35 Notes
  15. ISS Astronaut Sets Up CCF ExperimentNASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, has installed Capillary Channel Flow (CCF) experiment hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. CCF is a versatile experiment for studying a critical variety of inertial-capillary dominated flows key to spacecraft systems that cannot be studied on the ground.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/iss-astronaut-sets-ccf-experiment

    ISS Astronaut Sets Up CCF Experiment

    NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, has installed Capillary Channel Flow (CCF) experiment hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. CCF is a versatile experiment for studying a critical variety of inertial-capillary dominated flows key to spacecraft systems that cannot be studied on the ground.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/iss-astronaut-sets-ccf-experiment

  16. 11 Notes
  17. Milky Way Maps Could Help Solve Stubborn MysteryAn international team of sky scholars, including a key researcher from Johns Hopkins, has produced new maps of the material located between the stars in the Milky Way. The results should move astronomers closer to cracking a stardust puzzle that has vexed them for nearly a century.The maps and an accompanying journal article appear in today’s issue of the journal Science. The researchers say their work demonstrates a new way of uncovering the location and eventually the composition of the interstellar medium — the material found in the vast expanse between star systems within a galaxy.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/milky-way-maps-could-help-solve-stubborn-mystery

    Milky Way Maps Could Help Solve Stubborn Mystery

    An international team of sky scholars, including a key researcher from Johns Hopkins, has produced new maps of the material located between the stars in the Milky Way. The results should move astronomers closer to cracking a stardust puzzle that has vexed them for nearly a century.

    The maps and an accompanying journal article appear in today’s issue of the journal Science. The researchers say their work demonstrates a new way of uncovering the location and eventually the composition of the interstellar medium — the material found in the vast expanse between star systems within a galaxy.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/milky-way-maps-could-help-solve-stubborn-mystery

  18. 36 Notes
  19. Find May Protect Earth from AsteroidsResearchers at the Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville have made a novel discovery that may potentially protect the world from future collisions with asteroids.The team studied near-Earth asteroid 1950 DA and discovered that the body, which rotates so quickly it defies gravity, is held together by cohesive forces, called van der Waals, never before detected on an asteroid.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/find-may-protect-earth-asteroids

    Find May Protect Earth from Asteroids

    Researchers at the Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville have made a novel discovery that may potentially protect the world from future collisions with asteroids.

    The team studied near-Earth asteroid 1950 DA and discovered that the body, which rotates so quickly it defies gravity, is held together by cohesive forces, called van der Waals, never before detected on an asteroid.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/find-may-protect-earth-asteroids

  20. 25 Notes
  21. Research Aims to Create Versatile ‘Tapes’Porphyrin molecules are essential to many biological processes, such as photosynthesis and respiration. Wilhelm Auwärter’s group is investigating these all-round talents at Technische Universität München. Normally, hydrogen attaches to the outer edges of the porphyrin core – named porphin, but other chemical entities can take the place of hydrogen, thereby changing the properties of the molecules.Alissa Wiengarten, PhD student at the TUM Department of Physics, heats a porphin powder in a vacuum chamber. In the process, individual porphin molecules leave the collective and adhere to a silver surface, where they react with each other and assemble into small groups – all by themselves. Single molecules can desorb from the hot surface, while chains of two, three or more porphin units cannot. In this way the scientists were able to assemble chains of up to 90 porphin units.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/research-aims-create-versatile-%E2%80%98tapes%E2%80%99

    Research Aims to Create Versatile ‘Tapes’

    Porphyrin molecules are essential to many biological processes, such as photosynthesis and respiration. Wilhelm Auwärter’s group is investigating these all-round talents at Technische Universität München. Normally, hydrogen attaches to the outer edges of the porphyrin core – named porphin, but other chemical entities can take the place of hydrogen, thereby changing the properties of the molecules.

    Alissa Wiengarten, PhD student at the TUM Department of Physics, heats a porphin powder in a vacuum chamber. In the process, individual porphin molecules leave the collective and adhere to a silver surface, where they react with each other and assemble into small groups – all by themselves. Single molecules can desorb from the hot surface, while chains of two, three or more porphin units cannot. In this way the scientists were able to assemble chains of up to 90 porphin units.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/research-aims-create-versatile-%E2%80%98tapes%E2%80%99

  22. 39 Notes
  23. Tractor Beam on Water Could Contain Oil Spills

    Physicists at The Australian National Univ. (ANU) have created a tractor beam on water, providing a radical new technique that could confine oil spills, manipulate floating objects or explain rips at the beach.

    The team, led by Horst Punzmann, discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will. The team also experimented with different shaped plungers to generate different swirling flow patterns.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/08/tractor-beam-water-could-contain-oil-spills

  24. 146 Notes
  25. Astronomers Shed Light on Black Hole DevelopmentAn international team of scientists including a Virginia Tech physicist has discovered that winds blowing from a supermassive black hole in a nearby galaxy work to obscure observations and x-rays.The discovery, published in Science Express, sheds light on the unexpected behavior of black holes, which emit large amounts of matter through powerful, galactic winds.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/astronomers-shed-light-black-hole-development

    Astronomers Shed Light on Black Hole Development

    An international team of scientists including a Virginia Tech physicist has discovered that winds blowing from a supermassive black hole in a nearby galaxy work to obscure observations and x-rays.

    The discovery, published in Science Express, sheds light on the unexpected behavior of black holes, which emit large amounts of matter through powerful, galactic winds.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/astronomers-shed-light-black-hole-development

  26. 138 Notes
  27. Computer Model Reveals Water’s ‘Split Personality’ Seemingly ordinary, water has quite puzzling behavior. Why, for example, does ice float when most liquids crystallize into dense solids that sink?Using a computer model to explore water as it freezes, a team at Princeton Univ. has found that water’s weird behaviors may arise from a sort of split personality: at very cold temperatures and above a certain pressure, water may spontaneously split into two liquid forms.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/computer-model-reveals-waters-split-personality

    Computer Model Reveals Water’s ‘Split Personality’

    Seemingly ordinary, water has quite puzzling behavior. Why, for example, does ice float when most liquids crystallize into dense solids that sink?

    Using a computer model to explore water as it freezes, a team at Princeton Univ. has found that water’s weird behaviors may arise from a sort of split personality: at very cold temperatures and above a certain pressure, water may spontaneously split into two liquid forms.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/computer-model-reveals-waters-split-personality

  28. 28 Notes
  29. Method Could Make Sub-wavelength Images at Radio FrequenciesImaging and mapping of electric fields at radio frequencies (RF) currently requires the use of metallic structures such as dipoles, probes and reference antennas. To make such measurements efficiently, the size of these structures needs to be on the order of the wavelength of the RF fields to be mapped. This poses practical limitations on the smallest features that can be measured.New theoretical and experimental work by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Univ. of Michigan suggests an innovative method to overcome this limit by using laser light at optical wavelengths to measure and image RF fields. The new technique uses a pair of highly stable lasers and rubidium atoms as tunable resonators to map and potentially image electric fields at resolutions far below their RF wavelengths — though not below the much shorter wavelengths of the lasers.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/method-could-make-sub-wavelength-images-radio-frequencies

    Method Could Make Sub-wavelength Images at Radio Frequencies

    Imaging and mapping of electric fields at radio frequencies (RF) currently requires the use of metallic structures such as dipoles, probes and reference antennas. To make such measurements efficiently, the size of these structures needs to be on the order of the wavelength of the RF fields to be mapped. This poses practical limitations on the smallest features that can be measured.

    New theoretical and experimental work by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Univ. of Michigan suggests an innovative method to overcome this limit by using laser light at optical wavelengths to measure and image RF fields. The new technique uses a pair of highly stable lasers and rubidium atoms as tunable resonators to map and potentially image electric fields at resolutions far below their RF wavelengths — though not below the much shorter wavelengths of the lasers.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/method-could-make-sub-wavelength-images-radio-frequencies

  30. 18 Notes