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  1. Saturn’s Rings Shed Light on Moon FormationWriting in the journal Icarus this week, Prof. Carl Murray from Queen Mary Univ. of London’s Astronomy Unit reports that recently discovered disturbances at the very edge of Saturn’s outer bright A ring result from a small icy object that formed within the ring and which may be in the process of migrating out of it. His team have nicknamed the object, “Peggy.”"We hadn’t seen anything like this before," explains Murray. "We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right."Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/saturn%E2%80%99s-rings-shed-light-moon-formation

    Saturn’s Rings Shed Light on Moon Formation

    Writing in the journal Icarus this week, Prof. Carl Murray from Queen Mary Univ. of London’s Astronomy Unit reports that recently discovered disturbances at the very edge of Saturn’s outer bright A ring result from a small icy object that formed within the ring and which may be in the process of migrating out of it. His team have nicknamed the object, “Peggy.”

    "We hadn’t seen anything like this before," explains Murray. "We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right."

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/saturn%E2%80%99s-rings-shed-light-moon-formation

  2. 22 Notes
  3. Metals Extend Biomedical PotentialFrom dental implants that are light, strong and porous enough to bond with bone to surgical implants that dissolve over time, modified metals are dramatically extending biomedical potential.A new nanostructuring technique being researched by Prof. Yuri Estrin at Monash Univ.’s Centre for Advanced Hybrid Materials promises metals with greater strength, better corrosion resistance and increased biocompatibility.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/metals-extend-biomedical-potential

    Metals Extend Biomedical Potential

    From dental implants that are light, strong and porous enough to bond with bone to surgical implants that dissolve over time, modified metals are dramatically extending biomedical potential.

    A new nanostructuring technique being researched by Prof. Yuri Estrin at Monash Univ.’s Centre for Advanced Hybrid Materials promises metals with greater strength, better corrosion resistance and increased biocompatibility.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/metals-extend-biomedical-potential

  4. 19 Notes
  5. Lasers Enable Observation of Frantic Electrons

    A research team at the Univ. of Kansas has used high-powered lasers to track the speed and movement of electrons inside an innovative material that is just one atom thick. Their findings are published in the current issue of ACS Nano.

    The work at KU’s Ultrafast Laser Lab could help point the way to next-generation transistors and solar panels made of solid, atomically thin materials.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/lasers-enable-observation-frantic-electrons

  6. 9 Notes
  7. Quantum Dots Offer Solar Cells a Bright FutureA house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from Univ. of Milano-Bicocca (UNIMIB). Their project demonstrates that superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.“The key accomplishment is the demonstration of large-area luminescent solar concentrators that use a new generation of specially engineered quantum dots,” says lead researcher Victor Klimov of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP) at Los Alamos.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/quantum-dots-offer-solar-cells-bright-future

    Quantum Dots Offer Solar Cells a Bright Future

    A house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from Univ. of Milano-Bicocca (UNIMIB). Their project demonstrates that superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.

    “The key accomplishment is the demonstration of large-area luminescent solar concentrators that use a new generation of specially engineered quantum dots,” says lead researcher Victor Klimov of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP) at Los Alamos.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/quantum-dots-offer-solar-cells-bright-future

  8. 43 Notes
  9. Coughs, Sneezes Float Farther than You Think

    The next time you feel a sneeze coming on, raise your elbow to cover up that multiphase turbulent buoyant cloud you’re about to expel. That’s right: a novel study by MIT researchers shows that coughs and sneezes have associated gas clouds that keep their potentially infectious droplets aloft over much greater distances than previously realized.

    “When you cough or sneeze, you see the droplets, or feel them if someone sneezes on you,” says John Bush, a professor of applied mathematics at MIT, and co-author of a new paper on the subject. “But you don’t see the cloud, the invisible gas phase. The influence of this gas cloud is to extend the range of the individual droplets, particularly the small ones.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/04/coughs-sneezes-float-farther-you-think

  10. 18 Notes
  11. Scientists Verify World’s Largest Single Crystal of GoldWhen geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78 gram piece of gold was in fact the world’s largest single-crystal specimen — a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity — he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials.“The structure or atomic arrangement of gold crystals of this size has never been studied before, and we have a unique opportunity to do so,” the Miami Univ. professor says.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/scientists-verify-world%E2%80%99s-largest-single-crystal-gold

    Scientists Verify World’s Largest Single Crystal of Gold

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78 gram piece of gold was in fact the world’s largest single-crystal specimen — a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity — he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials.

    “The structure or atomic arrangement of gold crystals of this size has never been studied before, and we have a unique opportunity to do so,” the Miami Univ. professor says.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/scientists-verify-world%E2%80%99s-largest-single-crystal-gold

  12. 68 Notes
  13. 'Transition Zones' Appear to Be Tornado HotspotsAreas where landscape shifts from urban to rural or forest to farmland may have a higher likelihood of severe weather and tornado touchdowns, a Purdue Univ. study says.An examination of more than 60 years of Indiana tornado climatology data from the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center showed that a majority of tornado touchdowns occurred near areas where dramatically different landscapes meet — for example, where a city fades into farmland or a forest meets a plain.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/transition-zones-appear-be-tornado-hotspots

    'Transition Zones' Appear to Be Tornado Hotspots

    Areas where landscape shifts from urban to rural or forest to farmland may have a higher likelihood of severe weather and tornado touchdowns, a Purdue Univ. study says.

    An examination of more than 60 years of Indiana tornado climatology data from the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center showed that a majority of tornado touchdowns occurred near areas where dramatically different landscapes meet — for example, where a city fades into farmland or a forest meets a plain.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/transition-zones-appear-be-tornado-hotspots

  14. 44 Notes
  15. Nanotube-graphene Rebar Brings Out Best of BothCarbon nanotubes are reinforcing bars that make two-dimensional graphene much easier to handle in a new hybrid material grown by researchers at Rice Univ.The Rice lab of chemist James Tour set nanotubes into graphene in a way that not only mimics how steel rebar is used in concrete but also preserves and even improves the electrical and mechanical qualities of both.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanotube-graphene-rebar-brings-out-best-both

    Nanotube-graphene Rebar Brings Out Best of Both

    Carbon nanotubes are reinforcing bars that make two-dimensional graphene much easier to handle in a new hybrid material grown by researchers at Rice Univ.

    The Rice lab of chemist James Tour set nanotubes into graphene in a way that not only mimics how steel rebar is used in concrete but also preserves and even improves the electrical and mechanical qualities of both.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanotube-graphene-rebar-brings-out-best-both

  16. 11 Notes
  17. Self-Assembled Silver Superlattices Create Molecular MachinesA combined computational and experimental study of self-assembled silver-based structures known as superlattices has revealed an unusual and unexpected behavior: arrays of gear-like molecular-scale machines that rotate in unison when pressure is applied to them.Computational and experimental studies show that the superlattice structures, which are self-assembled from smaller clusters of silver nanoparticles and organic protecting molecules, form in layers with the hydrogen bonds between their components serving as “hinges” to facilitate the rotation. Movement of the “gears” is related to another unusual property of the material: increased pressure on the superlattice softens it, allowing subsequent compression to be done with significantly less force.,br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembled-silver-superlattices-create-molecular-machines

    Self-Assembled Silver Superlattices Create Molecular Machines

    A combined computational and experimental study of self-assembled silver-based structures known as superlattices has revealed an unusual and unexpected behavior: arrays of gear-like molecular-scale machines that rotate in unison when pressure is applied to them.

    Computational and experimental studies show that the superlattice structures, which are self-assembled from smaller clusters of silver nanoparticles and organic protecting molecules, form in layers with the hydrogen bonds between their components serving as “hinges” to facilitate the rotation. Movement of the “gears” is related to another unusual property of the material: increased pressure on the superlattice softens it, allowing subsequent compression to be done with significantly less force.
    ,br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/self-assembled-silver-superlattices-create-molecular-machines

  18. 24 Notes
  19. U.S. Gets New Time Standard

    The U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has officially launched a new atomic clock, called NIST-F2, to serve as a new U.S. civilian time and frequency standard, along with the current NIST-F1 standard.

    NIST-F2 would neither gain nor lose one second in about 300 million years, making it about three times as accurate as NIST-F1, which has served as the standard since 1999. Both clocks use a “fountain” of cesium atoms to determine the exact length of a second.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/04/us-gets-new-time-standard

  20. 21 Notes
  21. Quantum Photon Properties Revealed in PlasmonFor years, researchers have been interested in developing quantum computers — the theoretical next generation of technology that will outperform conventional computers. Instead of holding data in bits, the digital units used by computers today, quantum computers store information in units called “qubits.” One approach for computing with qubits relies on the creation of two single photons that interfere with one another in a device called a waveguide. Results from a recent applied science study at Caltech support the idea that waveguides coupled with another quantum particle — the surface plasmon — could also become an important piece of the quantum computing puzzle.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/quantum-photon-properties-revealed-plasmon

    Quantum Photon Properties Revealed in Plasmon

    For years, researchers have been interested in developing quantum computers — the theoretical next generation of technology that will outperform conventional computers. Instead of holding data in bits, the digital units used by computers today, quantum computers store information in units called “qubits.” One approach for computing with qubits relies on the creation of two single photons that interfere with one another in a device called a waveguide. Results from a recent applied science study at Caltech support the idea that waveguides coupled with another quantum particle — the surface plasmon — could also become an important piece of the quantum computing puzzle.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/quantum-photon-properties-revealed-plasmon

  22. 25 Notes
  23. Analysis Probes Charge Transfer in Battery ElectrodesThe electrochemical reactions inside the porous electrodes of batteries and fuel cells have been described by theorists, but never measured directly. Now, a team at MIT has figured out a way to measure the fundamental charge transfer rate — finding some significant surprises.The study found that the Butler-Volmer (BV) equation, usually used to describe reaction rates in electrodes, is inaccurate, especially at higher voltage levels. Instead, a different approach, called Marcus-Hush-Chidsey charge-transfer theory, provides more realistic results — revealing that the limiting step of these reactions is not what had been thought.The new findings could help engineers design better electrodes to improve batteries’ rates of charging and discharging, and provide a better understanding of other electrochemical processes, such as how to control corrosion.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/analysis-probes-charge-transfer-battery-electrodes

    Analysis Probes Charge Transfer in Battery Electrodes

    The electrochemical reactions inside the porous electrodes of batteries and fuel cells have been described by theorists, but never measured directly. Now, a team at MIT has figured out a way to measure the fundamental charge transfer rate — finding some significant surprises.

    The study found that the Butler-Volmer (BV) equation, usually used to describe reaction rates in electrodes, is inaccurate, especially at higher voltage levels. Instead, a different approach, called Marcus-Hush-Chidsey charge-transfer theory, provides more realistic results — revealing that the limiting step of these reactions is not what had been thought.

    The new findings could help engineers design better electrodes to improve batteries’ rates of charging and discharging, and provide a better understanding of other electrochemical processes, such as how to control corrosion.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/analysis-probes-charge-transfer-battery-electrodes

  24. 25 Notes
  25. Philosopher Examines Einstein Senility ControversyDrawing from Einstein’s collected papers, a philosophy professor has exonerated the theoretician from charges of senility and shows how physics is ultimately indebted to philosophy.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/philosopher-examines-einstein-senility-controversy

    Philosopher Examines Einstein Senility Controversy

    Drawing from Einstein’s collected papers, a philosophy professor has exonerated the theoretician from charges of senility and shows how physics is ultimately indebted to philosophy.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/philosopher-examines-einstein-senility-controversy

  26. 63 Notes
  27. Researchers Open Path to Rare, Polarized MetalsDrexel Univ. researchers are turning some of the basic tenets of chemistry and physics upside down to cut a trail toward the discovery of a new set of materials. They’re called “polar metals” and, according to many of the scientific principles that govern the behavior of atoms, they probably shouldn’t exist.James Rondinelli, a professor in the College of Engineering, and Danilo Puggioni, a postdoctoral researcher in the College, have shed light on this rare breed of electrically conductive polar metal — whose atomic makeup actually has more in common with a drop of water than a flake of rust — using an advanced computing method called density functional theory.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/researchers-open-path-rare-polarized-metals

    Researchers Open Path to Rare, Polarized Metals

    Drexel Univ. researchers are turning some of the basic tenets of chemistry and physics upside down to cut a trail toward the discovery of a new set of materials. They’re called “polar metals” and, according to many of the scientific principles that govern the behavior of atoms, they probably shouldn’t exist.

    James Rondinelli, a professor in the College of Engineering, and Danilo Puggioni, a postdoctoral researcher in the College, have shed light on this rare breed of electrically conductive polar metal — whose atomic makeup actually has more in common with a drop of water than a flake of rust — using an advanced computing method called density functional theory.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/researchers-open-path-rare-polarized-metals

  28. 27 Notes
  29. Scientist Has Estimated Number of Bubbles in ChampagneThe importance of fizz, more technically known as effervescence, in sparkling wines and champagnes is not to be underestimated — it contributes to the complete sensory experience of a glass, or flute, of fine bubbly. A scientist has now closely examined the factors that affect these bubbles, and he has come up with an estimate of just how many are in each glass. The report appears in ACS’ The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/scientist-has-estimated-number-bubbles-champagne

    Scientist Has Estimated Number of Bubbles in Champagne

    The importance of fizz, more technically known as effervescence, in sparkling wines and champagnes is not to be underestimated — it contributes to the complete sensory experience of a glass, or flute, of fine bubbly. A scientist has now closely examined the factors that affect these bubbles, and he has come up with an estimate of just how many are in each glass. The report appears in ACS’ The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/scientist-has-estimated-number-bubbles-champagne

  30. 31 Notes