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  1. Genes Have Role in Future Dental CareA visit to the dentist could one day require a detailed look at how genes in a patient’s body are being switched on or off, as well as examining their pearly whites, according to researchers at the Univ. of Adelaide.In a new paper published in the Australian Dental Journal, researchers from the Univ. of Adelaide’s School of Dentistry have written about the current and future use of the field of epigenetics as it relates to oral health.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/genes-have-role-future-dental-care

    Genes Have Role in Future Dental Care

    A visit to the dentist could one day require a detailed look at how genes in a patient’s body are being switched on or off, as well as examining their pearly whites, according to researchers at the Univ. of Adelaide.

    In a new paper published in the Australian Dental Journal, researchers from the Univ. of Adelaide’s School of Dentistry have written about the current and future use of the field of epigenetics as it relates to oral health.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/genes-have-role-future-dental-care

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  3. Pulling Teeth for Safer Heart Surgery May Be Catch-22To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery. In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly. But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: the study found that roughly one in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/pulling-teeth-safer-heart-surgery-may-be-catch-22

    Pulling Teeth for Safer Heart Surgery May Be Catch-22

    To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery. In such cases, problem teeth often are removed before surgery, to reduce the risk of infections including endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart that can prove deadly. But Mayo Clinic research suggests it may not be as simple as pulling teeth: the study found that roughly one in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/pulling-teeth-safer-heart-surgery-may-be-catch-22

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  5. Test Overestimates Mercury Exposure from Dental FillingsA common test used to determine mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings may significantly overestimate the amount of the toxic metal released from fillings, according to Univ. of Michigan researchers.Scientists agree that dental amalgam fillings slowly release mercury vapor into the mouth. But both the amount of mercury released and the question of whether this exposure presents a significant health risk remain controversial.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/test-overestimates-mercury-exposure-dental-fillings

    Test Overestimates Mercury Exposure from Dental Fillings

    A common test used to determine mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings may significantly overestimate the amount of the toxic metal released from fillings, according to Univ. of Michigan researchers.

    Scientists agree that dental amalgam fillings slowly release mercury vapor into the mouth. But both the amount of mercury released and the question of whether this exposure presents a significant health risk remain controversial.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/test-overestimates-mercury-exposure-dental-fillings

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  7. Sublingual Immunotherapy Treats Peanut AllergyPeanuts are one of the most common triggers of severe food-induced allergic reactions, which can be fatal, and the prevalence of peanut allergy is increasing. However, there is currently no clinical treatment available for peanut allergy other than strict dietary elimination and, in cases of accidental ingestion, injections of epinephrine.But a new multicenter clinical trial shows promise for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), a treatment in which patients are given daily doses, in gradually increasing amounts, of a liquid containing peanut powder. The patients first hold the liquid under the tongue for 2 minutes and then swallow it.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/sublingual-immunotherapy-treats-peanut-allergy

    Sublingual Immunotherapy Treats Peanut Allergy

    Peanuts are one of the most common triggers of severe food-induced allergic reactions, which can be fatal, and the prevalence of peanut allergy is increasing. However, there is currently no clinical treatment available for peanut allergy other than strict dietary elimination and, in cases of accidental ingestion, injections of epinephrine.

    But a new multicenter clinical trial shows promise for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), a treatment in which patients are given daily doses, in gradually increasing amounts, of a liquid containing peanut powder. The patients first hold the liquid under the tongue for 2 minutes and then swallow it.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/sublingual-immunotherapy-treats-peanut-allergy

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  9. Caffeinated Coffee Significantly Lowers Risk of Oral CancerA new American Cancer Society study finds a strong inverse association between caffeinated coffee intake and oral/pharyngeal cancer mortality. The authors say people who drank more than four cups of caffeinated coffee per day were at about half the risk of death of these often fatal cancers compared to those who only occasionally or who never drank coffee. The study is published online in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The authors say more research is needed to elucidate the biologic mechanisms that could be at work.Previous epidemiologic studies have suggested that coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer. To explore the finding further, researchers examined associations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea intake with fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a prospective U.S. cohort study begun in 1982 by the American Cancer Society.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/caffeinated-coffee-significantly-lowers-risk-oral-cancer

    Caffeinated Coffee Significantly Lowers Risk of Oral Cancer

    A new American Cancer Society study finds a strong inverse association between caffeinated coffee intake and oral/pharyngeal cancer mortality. The authors say people who drank more than four cups of caffeinated coffee per day were at about half the risk of death of these often fatal cancers compared to those who only occasionally or who never drank coffee. The study is published online in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The authors say more research is needed to elucidate the biologic mechanisms that could be at work.

    Previous epidemiologic studies have suggested that coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer. To explore the finding further, researchers examined associations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea intake with fatal oral/pharyngeal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II, a prospective U.S. cohort study begun in 1982 by the American Cancer Society.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/caffeinated-coffee-significantly-lowers-risk-oral-cancer

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  11. Oral Strips Give Instant Pain Relief for Burns

    A dissolvable oral strip has been developed to immediately relieve pain from burns caused by ingestion of hot foods and liquids, such as coffee, pizza and soup. This research is being presented at the 2012 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition, the world’s largest pharmaceutical sciences meeting.

    Lead researcher Jason McConville, and colleagues from Univ. of Texas at Austin, designed the strip for controlled delivery of a local anesthetic, benzocaine, and a therapeutic polymer. Benzocaine, commonly used as a topical pain reliever in dental products and throat lozenges, was chosen as for its non-irritating properties.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/oral-strips-give-instant-pain-relief-burns

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  13. Twins Do Not Share Oral Bacteria

    A new long-term study of human twins by Univ. of Colorado Boulder researchers indicates the makeup of the population of bacteria bathing in their saliva is driven more by environmental factors than heritability.

    The study compares saliva samples from identical and fraternal twins to see how much “bacterial communities” in saliva vary from mouth to mouth at different points in time, says study leader and CU-Boulder Prof. Kenneth Krauter. The twin studies show that the environment, rather than a person’s genetic background, is more important in determining the types of microbes that live in the mouth. For the new study, doctoral student Simone Stahringer sequenced the microbial DNA present in the saliva samples of twins. She and the research team then determined the microbes’ identities through comparison with a microbe sequence database. Saliva samples were gathered from twins over the course of a decade beginning in adolescence to see how salivary microbes change with time.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/twins-do-not-share-oral-bacteria

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  15. Oral Bacteria is an Indicator of Pancreatic Cancer RiskA new study finds significant associations between antibodies for multiple oral bacteria and the risk of pancreatic cancer, adding support for the emerging idea that the ostensibly distant medical conditions are related.Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal and difficult to detect early. In a new study, researchers report that people who had high levels of antibodies for an infectious oral bacterium turned out to have double the risk for developing the cancer. High antibody levels for harmless oral bacteria, meanwhile, predicted a reduced pancreatic cancer risk.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/oral-bacteria-indicator-pancreatic-cancer-risk

    Oral Bacteria is an Indicator of Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    A new study finds significant associations between antibodies for multiple oral bacteria and the risk of pancreatic cancer, adding support for the emerging idea that the ostensibly distant medical conditions are related.

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal and difficult to detect early. In a new study, researchers report that people who had high levels of antibodies for an infectious oral bacterium turned out to have double the risk for developing the cancer. High antibody levels for harmless oral bacteria, meanwhile, predicted a reduced pancreatic cancer risk.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/oral-bacteria-indicator-pancreatic-cancer-risk

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  17. Enzyme Plays Large Role in Oral Bone Loss

    A Univ. of Louisville scientist has found a way to prevent inflammation and bone loss surrounding the teeth by blocking a natural signaling pathway of the enzyme GSK3b, which plays an important role in directing the immune response.

    The discovery of UofL School of Dentistry researcher David Scott, and his team recently published online first in the journal Molecular Medicine. The finding not only has implications in preventing periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory disease that causes tooth loss, but also may have relevance to other chronic inflammatory diseases. Since GSK3b is involved in multiple inflammatory signaling pathways, it is associated with a number of diseases and also is being tested by scientists for its impact in Alzheimer’s disease, Type II diabetes and some forms of cancer, to name a few.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/enzyme-plays-large-role-oral-bone-loss

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  19. Oral Carcinogen Found in Smokeless TobaccoScientists identified the first substance in smokeless tobacco that is a strong oral carcinogen ― a health risk for the nine million users of chewing tobacco, snuff and related products in the U.S. ― and called upon the federal government to regulate or ban the substance.“This is the first example of a strong oral cavity carcinogen that’s in smokeless tobacco,” says Stephen Hecht, who led the study. “Our results are very important in regard to the growing use of smokeless tobacco in the world, especially among younger people who think it is a safer form of tobacco than cigarettes. We now have the identity of the only known strong oral carcinogen in these products.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/08/oral-carcinogen-found-smokeless-tobacco

    Oral Carcinogen Found in Smokeless Tobacco

    Scientists identified the first substance in smokeless tobacco that is a strong oral carcinogen ― a health risk for the nine million users of chewing tobacco, snuff and related products in the U.S. ― and called upon the federal government to regulate or ban the substance.

    “This is the first example of a strong oral cavity carcinogen that’s in smokeless tobacco,” says Stephen Hecht, who led the study. “Our results are very important in regard to the growing use of smokeless tobacco in the world, especially among younger people who think it is a safer form of tobacco than cigarettes. We now have the identity of the only known strong oral carcinogen in these products.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/08/oral-carcinogen-found-smokeless-tobacco

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  21. Bad Teeth Can Affect a Child’s School GradesPoor oral health, dental disease and tooth pain can put kids at a serious disadvantage in school, according to a new Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC study.“The Impact of Oral Health on the Academic Performance of Disadvantaged Children,” appearing in the September 2012 issue of the American Journal of Public Health, examined nearly 1,500 socioeconomically disadvantaged elementary and high school children in the Los Angeles Unified School District, matching their oral health status to their academic achievement and attendance records.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/08/bad-teeth-can-affect-child%E2%80%99s-school-grades

    Bad Teeth Can Affect a Child’s School Grades

    Poor oral health, dental disease and tooth pain can put kids at a serious disadvantage in school, according to a new Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC study.

    “The Impact of Oral Health on the Academic Performance of Disadvantaged Children,” appearing in the September 2012 issue of the American Journal of Public Health, examined nearly 1,500 socioeconomically disadvantaged elementary and high school children in the Los Angeles Unified School District, matching their oral health status to their academic achievement and attendance records.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/08/bad-teeth-can-affect-child%E2%80%99s-school-grades

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  23. Taste Receptors Find Sweetener to be Bitter

    Stevia is regarded as a healthy alternative to sugar. Yet there are drawbacks to the stevia products recently approved as sweeteners by the European Union. One of these is a long-lasting bitter after-taste. Scientists at Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) and the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE) have now identified the receptors on the human tongue mediating the bitter sensation. The work has been published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

    The human tongue has just one receptor type for detecting sweetness but about 25 different ones for bitter flavors. Scientists at Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) and the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE) have now identified the two receptors, hTAS2R4 and hTAS2R14, that detect the bitter after taste of stevia.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Receptors-Find-Sweetener-to-be-Bitter-060112.aspx

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  25. Tooth Tattoo Senses Harmful BacteriaUsing silk strands pulled from cocoons and gold wires thinner than a spider’s web, researchers at Princeton Univ. have created a removable tattoo that adheres to dental enamel and could eventually monitor a patient’s health with unprecedented sensitivity.In a laboratory in Princeton’s Engineering Quadrangle, a graduate student demonstrated the system’s wireless capability, breathing across a sensor attached to a cow’s tooth. Instantaneously, the sensor generated a response to the student’s breath and transmitted a signal to a nearby monitor.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Tooth-Tattoo-Senses-Harmful-Bacteria-053112.aspx

    Tooth Tattoo Senses Harmful Bacteria

    Using silk strands pulled from cocoons and gold wires thinner than a spider’s web, researchers at Princeton Univ. have created a removable tattoo that adheres to dental enamel and could eventually monitor a patient’s health with unprecedented sensitivity.

    In a laboratory in Princeton’s Engineering Quadrangle, a graduate student demonstrated the system’s wireless capability, breathing across a sensor attached to a cow’s tooth. Instantaneously, the sensor generated a response to the student’s breath and transmitted a signal to a nearby monitor.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Tooth-Tattoo-Senses-Harmful-Bacteria-053112.aspx

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  27. Oral Health May Be Key to Healthy JointsThe culprit behind a failed hip or knee replacements might be found in the mouth.DNA testing of bacteria from the fluid that lubricates hip and knee joints had bacteria with the same DNA as the plaque from patients with gum disease and in need of a joint replacement. This study is one of many coming from the Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine that have linked oral bacteria to health problems when they escape from the mouth and enter the blood.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Oral-Health-May-Be-Key-to-Healthy-Joints-041912.aspx

    Oral Health May Be Key to Healthy Joints

    The culprit behind a failed hip or knee replacements might be found in the mouth.

    DNA testing of bacteria from the fluid that lubricates hip and knee joints had bacteria with the same DNA as the plaque from patients with gum disease and in need of a joint replacement. This study is one of many coming from the Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Dental Medicine that have linked oral bacteria to health problems when they escape from the mouth and enter the blood.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Oral-Health-May-Be-Key-to-Healthy-Joints-041912.aspx

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