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  1. Childhood Obesity Costs $19,000 Over LifetimeChildhood obesity comes with an estimated price tag of $19,000 per child when comparing lifetime medical costs to those of a normal weight child, according to an analysis led by researchers at the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. When multiplied by the number of obese 10-year-olds in the U.S., lifetime medical costs for this age alone reach roughly $14 billion.An alternative estimate, which takes into account the possibility of normal weight children gaining weight in adulthood, reduces the cost to $12,900 per obese child. The findings appear online today, in the journal Pediatrics.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childhood-obesity-costs-19000-over-lifetime

    Childhood Obesity Costs $19,000 Over Lifetime

    Childhood obesity comes with an estimated price tag of $19,000 per child when comparing lifetime medical costs to those of a normal weight child, according to an analysis led by researchers at the Duke Global Health Institute and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. When multiplied by the number of obese 10-year-olds in the U.S., lifetime medical costs for this age alone reach roughly $14 billion.

    An alternative estimate, which takes into account the possibility of normal weight children gaining weight in adulthood, reduces the cost to $12,900 per obese child. The findings appear online today, in the journal Pediatrics.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childhood-obesity-costs-19000-over-lifetime

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  3. Child’s Obesity Linked to Cognitive FunctionA new Univ. of Illinois study has found that obese children are slower than healthy-weight children to recognize when they have made an error and correct it. The research is the first to show that weight status not only affects how quickly children react to stimuli but also impacts the level of activity that occurs in the cerebral cortex during action monitoring.“I like to explain action monitoring this way: when you’re typing, you don’t have to be looking at your keyboard or your screen to realize that you’ve made a keystroke error. That’s because action monitoring is occurring in your brain’s prefrontal cortex,” says Charles Hillman, a U of I professor of kinesiology and faculty member in the U of I’s Division of Nutritional Sciences.>br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childs-obesity-linked-cognitive-function

    Child’s Obesity Linked to Cognitive Function

    A new Univ. of Illinois study has found that obese children are slower than healthy-weight children to recognize when they have made an error and correct it. The research is the first to show that weight status not only affects how quickly children react to stimuli but also impacts the level of activity that occurs in the cerebral cortex during action monitoring.

    “I like to explain action monitoring this way: when you’re typing, you don’t have to be looking at your keyboard or your screen to realize that you’ve made a keystroke error. That’s because action monitoring is occurring in your brain’s prefrontal cortex,” says Charles Hillman, a U of I professor of kinesiology and faculty member in the U of I’s Division of Nutritional Sciences.
    >br />Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/childs-obesity-linked-cognitive-function

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  5. Study Shows Link Between Obesity, Carb DigestionNew research indicates that obesity in the general population may be genetically linked to how our bodies digest carbohydrates.Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study investigated the relationship between body weight and a gene called AMY1, which is responsible for an enzyme present in our saliva known as salivary amylase. This enzyme is the first to be encountered by food when it enters the mouth, and it begins the process of starch digestion that then continues in the gut.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-shows-link-between-obesity-carb-digestion

    Study Shows Link Between Obesity, Carb Digestion

    New research indicates that obesity in the general population may be genetically linked to how our bodies digest carbohydrates.

    Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study investigated the relationship between body weight and a gene called AMY1, which is responsible for an enzyme present in our saliva known as salivary amylase. This enzyme is the first to be encountered by food when it enters the mouth, and it begins the process of starch digestion that then continues in the gut.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-shows-link-between-obesity-carb-digestion

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  7. Fat Mass in Cells Expands with DisuseOver 35 percent of American adults and 17 percent of American children are considered obese, according to the latest survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associated with diabetes, heart disease, stroke and even certain types of cancer, obesity places a major burden on the health care system and economy. It’s usually treated through a combination of diet, nutrition, exercise and other techniques.To understand how obesity develops, Prof. Amit Gefen, Natan Shaked and Naama Shoham of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, together with Prof. Dafna Benayahu of TAU’s Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, used state-of-the-art technology to analyze the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level. According to their findings, nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity. The mechanics of “cellular expansion” plays a primary role in fat production, they discovered.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/fat-mass-cells-expands-disuse

    Fat Mass in Cells Expands with Disuse

    Over 35 percent of American adults and 17 percent of American children are considered obese, according to the latest survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Associated with diabetes, heart disease, stroke and even certain types of cancer, obesity places a major burden on the health care system and economy. It’s usually treated through a combination of diet, nutrition, exercise and other techniques.

    To understand how obesity develops, Prof. Amit Gefen, Natan Shaked and Naama Shoham of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, together with Prof. Dafna Benayahu of TAU’s Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, used state-of-the-art technology to analyze the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level. According to their findings, nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity. The mechanics of “cellular expansion” plays a primary role in fat production, they discovered.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/fat-mass-cells-expands-disuse

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  9. Study Dispels Diabetic ‘Obesity Paradox’ MythThe “obesity paradox” — the controversial notion that being overweight might actually be healthier for some people with diabetes — seems to be a myth, researchers report. A major study finds there’s no survival advantage to being large, and a disadvantage to being very large.More than 24 million Americans have diabetes, mostly Type 2, the kind that is on the rise because of obesity. About two-thirds of U.S. adults are overweight, including one-third who are obese. Weighing too much increases the chances of heart disease, cancer and premature death. But some small studies have suggested this might not be true for everyone, and that Type 2 diabetics might even benefit from a few extra pounds — a “metabolic reserve” to help get them through sickness.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/study-dispels-diabetic-obesity-paradox-myth

    Study Dispels Diabetic ‘Obesity Paradox’ Myth

    The “obesity paradox” — the controversial notion that being overweight might actually be healthier for some people with diabetes — seems to be a myth, researchers report. A major study finds there’s no survival advantage to being large, and a disadvantage to being very large.

    More than 24 million Americans have diabetes, mostly Type 2, the kind that is on the rise because of obesity. About two-thirds of U.S. adults are overweight, including one-third who are obese. Weighing too much increases the chances of heart disease, cancer and premature death. But some small studies have suggested this might not be true for everyone, and that Type 2 diabetics might even benefit from a few extra pounds — a “metabolic reserve” to help get them through sickness.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/study-dispels-diabetic-obesity-paradox-myth

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  11. Obesity Changes Sense of Taste in MiceObesity may alter the way we taste at the most fundamental level: by changing how our tongues react to different foods. In a study in the journal PLOS ONE, Univ. at Buffalo biologists report that being severely overweight impaired the ability of mice to detect sweets.Compared with slimmer counterparts, the plump mice had fewer taste cells that responded to sweet stimuli. What’s more, the cells that did respond to sweetness reacted relatively weakly. The findings peel back a new layer of the mystery of how obesity alters our relationship to food.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/obesity-changes-sense-taste-mice

    Obesity Changes Sense of Taste in Mice

    Obesity may alter the way we taste at the most fundamental level: by changing how our tongues react to different foods. In a study in the journal PLOS ONE, Univ. at Buffalo biologists report that being severely overweight impaired the ability of mice to detect sweets.

    Compared with slimmer counterparts, the plump mice had fewer taste cells that responded to sweet stimuli. What’s more, the cells that did respond to sweetness reacted relatively weakly. The findings peel back a new layer of the mystery of how obesity alters our relationship to food.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/obesity-changes-sense-taste-mice

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  13. New Guidelines Tougher on ObesityNext time you go for a checkup, don’t be surprised if your doctor gets on your case about your weight.The medical profession has issued new guidelines for fighting the nation’s obesity epidemic, and they urge physicians to be a lot more aggressive about helping patients drop those extra pounds.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/new-guidelines-tougher-obesity

    New Guidelines Tougher on Obesity

    Next time you go for a checkup, don’t be surprised if your doctor gets on your case about your weight.

    The medical profession has issued new guidelines for fighting the nation’s obesity epidemic, and they urge physicians to be a lot more aggressive about helping patients drop those extra pounds.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/new-guidelines-tougher-obesity

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  15. Huge Soda Tax Would Lower UK ObesitySlapping a 20 percent tax on soda in Britain could cut the number of obese adults by about 180,000, according to a new study.Though the number works out to a modest drop of 1.3 percent in obesity, scientists say that reduction would still be worthwhile in the UK, which has a population of about 63 million and is the fattest country in Western Europe. About one in four Britons is obese.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/huge-soda-tax-would-lower-uk-obesity

    Huge Soda Tax Would Lower UK Obesity

    Slapping a 20 percent tax on soda in Britain could cut the number of obese adults by about 180,000, according to a new study.

    Though the number works out to a modest drop of 1.3 percent in obesity, scientists say that reduction would still be worthwhile in the UK, which has a population of about 63 million and is the fattest country in Western Europe. About one in four Britons is obese.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/huge-soda-tax-would-lower-uk-obesity

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  17. Genetic Mutations Cause Severe Obesity

    Researchers from the Univ. of Cambridge have discovered a novel genetic cause of severe obesity that — although relatively rare — demonstrates for the first time that genes can reduce basal metabolic rate.

    Previous studies (performed by David Powell and colleagues at Lexicon Pharmaceuticals in Texas) demonstrated that when the gene KSR2 (Kinase Suppressor of Ras 2) was deleted in mice, the animals became severely obese. As a result of this research, Prof. Sadaf Farooqi from the Univ. of Cambridge’s Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science decided to explore whether KSR2 mutations might also lead to obesity in humans.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/genetic-mutations-cause-severe-obesity

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  19. Obesity Linked to Occasional MigrainesPeople who get occasional migraines are more likely to be obese than people who do not have migraines, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.“Previous studies have shown a link between people with chronic migraine and obesity, but the research has been conflicting on whether that link existed for those with less frequent attacks,” says study author B. Lee Peterlin, of Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine. “As obesity is a risk factor that can potentially be modified and since some medications for migraine can lead to weight gain or loss, this is important information for people with migraine and their doctors.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/obesity-linked-occasional-migraines

    Obesity Linked to Occasional Migraines

    People who get occasional migraines are more likely to be obese than people who do not have migraines, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

    “Previous studies have shown a link between people with chronic migraine and obesity, but the research has been conflicting on whether that link existed for those with less frequent attacks,” says study author B. Lee Peterlin, of Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine. “As obesity is a risk factor that can potentially be modified and since some medications for migraine can lead to weight gain or loss, this is important information for people with migraine and their doctors.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/obesity-linked-occasional-migraines

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  21. Good Bacteria May Fight ObesityCall it a hidden ally: the right germs just might be able to help fight fat. Different kinds of bacteria that live inside the gut can help spur obesity or protect against it, say scientists at Washington Univ. in St. Louis who transplanted intestinal germs from fat or lean people into mice and watched the rodents change.And what they ate determined whether the good germs could move in and do their job. The report raises the possibility of one day turning gut bacteria into personalized fat-fighting therapies, and it may help explain why some people have a harder time losing weight than others do.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/good-bacteria-may-fight-obesity

    Good Bacteria May Fight Obesity

    Call it a hidden ally: the right germs just might be able to help fight fat. Different kinds of bacteria that live inside the gut can help spur obesity or protect against it, say scientists at Washington Univ. in St. Louis who transplanted intestinal germs from fat or lean people into mice and watched the rodents change.

    And what they ate determined whether the good germs could move in and do their job. The report raises the possibility of one day turning gut bacteria into personalized fat-fighting therapies, and it may help explain why some people have a harder time losing weight than others do.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/good-bacteria-may-fight-obesity

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  23. Childhood Obesity Rates Fall in 18 States

    Health officials say they have the first evidence of a national decline in childhood obesity. A government report found at least slight declines in obesity rates for low-income preschoolers in 18 states. Rates went up in three states.

    The report is based on the heights and weights of children in a federal food program.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/childhood-obesity-rates-fall-18-states

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  25. One Can of Sugar-Laden Soda Heightens Diabetes RiskDrinking one extra sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 22 percent, a new study suggests.The finding is based on data from 350,000 people in eight European countries and published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/04/one-can-sugar-laden-soda-heightens-diabetes-risk

    One Can of Sugar-Laden Soda Heightens Diabetes Risk

    Drinking one extra sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 22 percent, a new study suggests.

    The finding is based on data from 350,000 people in eight European countries and published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/04/one-can-sugar-laden-soda-heightens-diabetes-risk

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  27. Vitamin D May Lower Diabetes Risk in Obese Youngsters

    Childhood and adolescent obesity rates in the United States have increased dramatically in the past three decades. Being obese puts individuals at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease in which individuals have too much sugar in their blood. Now, Univ. of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease.

    “By increasing vitamin D intake alone, we got a response that was nearly as powerful as what we have seen using a prescription drug,” says Catherine Peterson, an associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology at MU. “We saw a decrease in insulin levels, which means better glucose control, despite no changes in body weight, dietary intake or physical activity.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/vitamin-d-may-lower-diabetes-risk-obese-youngsters

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  29. Early Consumption of Carbs Heightens Obesity RiskConsumption of foods high in carbohydrates immediately after birth programs individuals for lifelong increased weight gain and obesity, a Univ. at Buffalo animal study has found, even if caloric intake is restricted in adulthood for a period of time.“This is the first time that we have shown in our rat model of obesity that there is a resistance to the reversal of this programming effect in adult life,” explains Mulchand Patel, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry and associate dean for research and biomedical education in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/early-consumption-carbs-heightens-obesity-risk

    Early Consumption of Carbs Heightens Obesity Risk

    Consumption of foods high in carbohydrates immediately after birth programs individuals for lifelong increased weight gain and obesity, a Univ. at Buffalo animal study has found, even if caloric intake is restricted in adulthood for a period of time.

    “This is the first time that we have shown in our rat model of obesity that there is a resistance to the reversal of this programming effect in adult life,” explains Mulchand Patel, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry and associate dean for research and biomedical education in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/early-consumption-carbs-heightens-obesity-risk

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