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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Acupuncture Needles Need Improvements for Comfort, SafetyWhile the quality of needles used in acupuncture worldwide is high, RMIT Univ. researchers have found more needs to be done to increase safety and avoid potential problems, such as pain and allergic reactions. The researchers looked at surface conditions and other physical properties of the two most commonly used stainless steel acupuncture needle brands.The study, which has been published in Acupuncture in Medicine, found that although manufacturing processes have improved, surface irregularities and bent needle tips have not been entirely eliminated.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/acupuncture-needles-need-improvements-comfort-safety

    Acupuncture Needles Need Improvements for Comfort, Safety

    While the quality of needles used in acupuncture worldwide is high, RMIT Univ. researchers have found more needs to be done to increase safety and avoid potential problems, such as pain and allergic reactions. The researchers looked at surface conditions and other physical properties of the two most commonly used stainless steel acupuncture needle brands.

    The study, which has been published in Acupuncture in Medicine, found that although manufacturing processes have improved, surface irregularities and bent needle tips have not been entirely eliminated.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/acupuncture-needles-need-improvements-comfort-safety

  2. 22 Notes
  3. Man Pleads Guilty to Infecting Others with Hep CIn his five-year career as a traveling medical technician, the longest that David Kwiatkowski ever stayed in one place was the 13 months he spent at New Hampshire’s Exeter Hospital. He’s now spent an equal amount of time in jail, and his next stop will be federal prison for far longer.Kwiatkowski pleaded guilty today to 14 federal drug charges in exchange for a sentence of 30 to 40 years in prison. He will be sentenced at a later date, probably in November, U.S. Attorney John Kacavas says.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/man-pleads-guilty-infecting-others-hep-c

    Man Pleads Guilty to Infecting Others with Hep C

    In his five-year career as a traveling medical technician, the longest that David Kwiatkowski ever stayed in one place was the 13 months he spent at New Hampshire’s Exeter Hospital. He’s now spent an equal amount of time in jail, and his next stop will be federal prison for far longer.

    Kwiatkowski pleaded guilty today to 14 federal drug charges in exchange for a sentence of 30 to 40 years in prison. He will be sentenced at a later date, probably in November, U.S. Attorney John Kacavas says.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/man-pleads-guilty-infecting-others-hep-c

  4. 9 Notes
  5. Porcupine Quills Inspire Improved Medical DevicesAnyone unfortunate enough to encounter a porcupine’s quills knows that once they go in, they are extremely difficult to remove. Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital now hope to exploit the porcupine quill’s unique properties to develop new types of adhesives, needles and other medical devices.In a new study, the researchers characterized, for the first time, the forces needed for quills to enter and exit the skin. They also created artificial devices with the same mechanical features as the quills, raising the possibility of designing less-painful needles, or adhesives that can bind internal tissues more securely.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/porcupine-quills-inspire-improved-medical-devices

    Porcupine Quills Inspire Improved Medical Devices

    Anyone unfortunate enough to encounter a porcupine’s quills knows that once they go in, they are extremely difficult to remove. Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital now hope to exploit the porcupine quill’s unique properties to develop new types of adhesives, needles and other medical devices.

    In a new study, the researchers characterized, for the first time, the forces needed for quills to enter and exit the skin. They also created artificial devices with the same mechanical features as the quills, raising the possibility of designing less-painful needles, or adhesives that can bind internal tissues more securely.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/porcupine-quills-inspire-improved-medical-devices

  6. 15 Notes
  7. Laser System Promises Painless InjectionsFrom annual flu shots to childhood immunizations, needle injections are among the least popular staples of medical care. Though various techniques have been developed in hopes of taking the “ouch” out of injections, hypodermic needles are still the first choice for ease-of-use, precision and control.However, a new laser-based system that blasts microscopic jets of drugs into the skin could soon make getting a shot as painless as being hit with a puff of air.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/laser-system-promises-painless-injections

    Laser System Promises Painless Injections

    From annual flu shots to childhood immunizations, needle injections are among the least popular staples of medical care. Though various techniques have been developed in hopes of taking the “ouch” out of injections, hypodermic needles are still the first choice for ease-of-use, precision and control.

    However, a new laser-based system that blasts microscopic jets of drugs into the skin could soon make getting a shot as painless as being hit with a puff of air.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/laser-system-promises-painless-injections

  8. 21 Notes
  9. Microneedles Can Improve Eye Treatments Thanks to tiny microneedles, eye doctors may soon have a better way to treat diseases such as macular degeneration that affect tissues in the back of the eye. That could be important as the population ages and develops more eye-related illnesses– and as pharmaceutical companies develop new drugs that otherwise could only be administered by injecting into the eye with a hypodermic needle.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Microneedles-Can-Improve-Eye-Treatments-072412.aspx?xmlmenuid=51

    Microneedles Can Improve Eye Treatments

    Thanks to tiny microneedles, eye doctors may soon have a better way to treat diseases such as macular degeneration that affect tissues in the back of the eye. That could be important as the population ages and develops more eye-related illnesses– and as pharmaceutical companies develop new drugs that otherwise could only be administered by injecting into the eye with a hypodermic needle.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Microneedles-Can-Improve-Eye-Treatments-072412.aspx?xmlmenuid=51

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  11. Microneedles Could Prevent HIV

    Applying a vaccine patch to the skin with thousands of tiny micro-needles could help boost the body’s immune response and prevent the spread of life-threatening infections like HIV and TB.

  12. 21 Notes