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  1. Egyptians Mummified the Dead Earlier than ThoughtResearchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.The scientific findings of an 11-year study by a researcher in the Department of Archaeology at York, York’s BioArCh facility and an Egyptologist from the Department of Ancient History at Macquarie Univ., push back the origins of a central and vital facet of ancient Egyptian culture by over a millennium.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/egyptians-mummified-dead-earlier-thought

    Egyptians Mummified the Dead Earlier than Thought

    Researchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.

    The scientific findings of an 11-year study by a researcher in the Department of Archaeology at York, York’s BioArCh facility and an Egyptologist from the Department of Ancient History at Macquarie Univ., push back the origins of a central and vital facet of ancient Egyptian culture by over a millennium.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/egyptians-mummified-dead-earlier-thought

  2. 43 Notes
  3. Mummy Study Finds Ancient Egyptians Were VegetariansDid the ancient Egyptians eat like us? If you’re a vegetarian, tucking in along the Nile thousands of years ago would have felt just like home.In fact, eating lots of meat is a recent phenomenon. In ancient cultures vegetarianism was much more common, except in nomadic populations. Most sedentary populations ate fruit and vegetables.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/mummy-study-finds-ancient-egyptians-were-vegetarians

    Mummy Study Finds Ancient Egyptians Were Vegetarians

    Did the ancient Egyptians eat like us? If you’re a vegetarian, tucking in along the Nile thousands of years ago would have felt just like home.

    In fact, eating lots of meat is a recent phenomenon. In ancient cultures vegetarianism was much more common, except in nomadic populations. Most sedentary populations ate fruit and vegetables.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/mummy-study-finds-ancient-egyptians-were-vegetarians

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  5. Mummified Head Didn’t Belong to Beloved French KingThree years ago, French researchers declared that a centuries-old mummified head was that of the beloved King Henri IV. But now a new study says, “Non!”The original conclusion was based largely on facial reconstruction techniques and signs the skull had injuries similar to those suffered by the monarch. The new study looked at DNA instead.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/mummified-head-didnt-belong-beloved-french-king

    Mummified Head Didn’t Belong to Beloved French King

    Three years ago, French researchers declared that a centuries-old mummified head was that of the beloved King Henri IV. But now a new study says, “Non!”

    The original conclusion was based largely on facial reconstruction techniques and signs the skull had injuries similar to those suffered by the monarch. The new study looked at DNA instead.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/mummified-head-didnt-belong-beloved-french-king

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  7. Hospital Cleans 2,500-Year-Old MummyA 2,500-year-old Egyptian mummy is coming out of its coffin to undergo cleaning and restoration procedures at Massachusetts General Hospital. The mummy known as Padihershef has been on display at the third oldest general hospital in the U.S. since it received him as a gift from the city of Boston in 1823 as a medical oddity.Today, a conservator trained in restoring ancient artifacts will remove him from his coffin and use cotton swabs to wipe away salt deposits from his face. The salt has been slowly seeping out of his tissue, a result of the mummification process. Experts are also expected to do minor repair and stabilization work on his coffin.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/hospital-cleans-2500-year-old-mummy

    Hospital Cleans 2,500-Year-Old Mummy

    A 2,500-year-old Egyptian mummy is coming out of its coffin to undergo cleaning and restoration procedures at Massachusetts General Hospital. The mummy known as Padihershef has been on display at the third oldest general hospital in the U.S. since it received him as a gift from the city of Boston in 1823 as a medical oddity.

    Today, a conservator trained in restoring ancient artifacts will remove him from his coffin and use cotton swabs to wipe away salt deposits from his face. The salt has been slowly seeping out of his tissue, a result of the mummification process. Experts are also expected to do minor repair and stabilization work on his coffin.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/hospital-cleans-2500-year-old-mummy

  8. 15 Notes
  9. Modern Cat Mummy Sheds Light on Ramses IISome millennia ago, Yes might have been the object of worship in ancient Egypt. Today, Yes – a modern, domestic house cat – is helping shed light on the practice of mummification and the lives of ancients, such as Ramses II, the most celebrated pharaoh of Egypt.Emerging from a study looking to determine whether Ramses II had ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a chronic inflammatory disease of the spine which makes vertebrae look dense in radiographs, the study of Yes started when a graduate student asked The Univ. of Western Ontario’s professor Andrew Nelson to mummify his pet, who passed away from pancreatitis.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/modern-cat-mummy-sheds-light-ramses-ii

    Modern Cat Mummy Sheds Light on Ramses II

    Some millennia ago, Yes might have been the object of worship in ancient Egypt. Today, Yes – a modern, domestic house cat – is helping shed light on the practice of mummification and the lives of ancients, such as Ramses II, the most celebrated pharaoh of Egypt.

    Emerging from a study looking to determine whether Ramses II had ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a chronic inflammatory disease of the spine which makes vertebrae look dense in radiographs, the study of Yes started when a graduate student asked The Univ. of Western Ontario’s professor Andrew Nelson to mummify his pet, who passed away from pancreatitis.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/modern-cat-mummy-sheds-light-ramses-ii

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  11. LEGOs Used to Conserve Ancient Mummy CaseThanks to an ambitious conservation project and some tiny pieces of plastic, the ancient Egyptian mummy case of Hor is now on display in the Fitzwilliam Museum, at Cambridge Univ. The conservation of the cartonnage mummy case was undertaken with the assistance of the Department of Engineering, who helped construct clever frames to support the delicate case during conservation and a new display case with internal supports using LEGO.The mummy case was found in the Ramesseum at Thebes in 1896. The gilded wooden face had been torn out by robbers and the mummy removed. Cartonnage is a uniquely Egyptian material, often only a few millimeters thick, consisting of layers of plaster, linen and glue. It is remarkably rigid but also very sensitive to humidity. At some point Hor had been exposed to damp conditions and had sagged dramatically around the chest and face. This caused structural problems and also serious cracking and instability in the painted decoration. There had been some attempts at repair and restoration, most probably in the cartonnage’s early years in the Museum.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/legos-used-conserve-ancient-mummy-case

    LEGOs Used to Conserve Ancient Mummy Case

    Thanks to an ambitious conservation project and some tiny pieces of plastic, the ancient Egyptian mummy case of Hor is now on display in the Fitzwilliam Museum, at Cambridge Univ. The conservation of the cartonnage mummy case was undertaken with the assistance of the Department of Engineering, who helped construct clever frames to support the delicate case during conservation and a new display case with internal supports using LEGO.

    The mummy case was found in the Ramesseum at Thebes in 1896. The gilded wooden face had been torn out by robbers and the mummy removed. Cartonnage is a uniquely Egyptian material, often only a few millimeters thick, consisting of layers of plaster, linen and glue. It is remarkably rigid but also very sensitive to humidity. At some point Hor had been exposed to damp conditions and had sagged dramatically around the chest and face. This caused structural problems and also serious cracking and instability in the painted decoration. There had been some attempts at repair and restoration, most probably in the cartonnage’s early years in the Museum.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/legos-used-conserve-ancient-mummy-case

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  13. Cancer Found in Ancient Mummy Caused by GeneticsA professor from American Univ. in Cairo says the discovery of prostate cancer in a 2,200-year-old mummy indicates the disease was caused by genetics, not environment. The genetics-environment question is key to understanding cancer.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-cancer-found-in-ancient-mummy-caused-by-genetics-013012.aspx

    Cancer Found in Ancient Mummy Caused by Genetics

    A professor from American Univ. in Cairo says the discovery of prostate cancer in a 2,200-year-old mummy indicates the disease was caused by genetics, not environment. The genetics-environment question is key to understanding cancer.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-cancer-found-in-ancient-mummy-caused-by-genetics-013012.aspx

  14. 385 Notes
  15. amnhnyc:

DNA from mummified crocodiles helped reveal that the Nile crocodile is really two distinct species. Read the full story here. 
Photo courtesy of John Thorbjarnarson, Wildlife Conservation Society.

    amnhnyc:

    DNA from mummified crocodiles helped reveal that the Nile crocodile is really two distinct species. Read the full story here

    Photo courtesy of John Thorbjarnarson, Wildlife Conservation Society.

  16. 214 Notes
    Reblogged: amnhnyc
  17. National Geographic: Wormlike Parasite Detected in Ancient Mummies

    Since the discovery of parasite eggs on mummies in the 1920s, scientists have suspected that the Nubians might have been infected by schistosomiasis. Nubia was a former African kingdom that existed from about A.D. 250 to 1400 in what is now northern Sudan.

    But researchers generally assumed that the disease in Nubians had been caused by S. haematobium, a close cousin of S. mansoni that causes similar symptoms but that doesn’t require irrigation channels to thrive.

    “The snail that transmits S. haematobium thrives better in water that’s moving and well oxygenated and that is not very polluted, whereas the S. mansoni snail does very well in water that’s been standing around and has more yuck in it,” said study first author Amber Campbell Hibbs, who conducted the study while at Emory.

    Campbell Hibbs and colleagues examined hundreds of naturally mummified Nubian mummies.

    “What happened is they were buried, and it’s so dry that you usually get mummification of the external skin, and sometimes some of the organs.”

    An analysis of the mummified skin revealed traces of proteins belonging to S. mansoni—the first proof that the ancient Nubians, or any ancient civilization, were afflicted by schistosomiasis.

  18. 16 Notes
    Reblogged: biomedicalephemera