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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. ‘Natural’ Moisturizers Can Cause Food AllergiesA woman has experienced a life-threating allergic reaction after using a moisturiser with “natural” ingredients. The 55-year-old woman experienced the reaction after eating goat’s cheese, which researchers say was triggered by the repeated use several months earlier of a moisturizer that contained goat’s milk.Prof. Robyn O’Hehir, Director of Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, at Monash Univ. says many creams – even for the treatment of dry skin and eczema – are advertised as “natural” products.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98natural%E2%80%99-moisturizers-can-cause-food-allergies

    ‘Natural’ Moisturizers Can Cause Food Allergies

    A woman has experienced a life-threating allergic reaction after using a moisturiser with “natural” ingredients. The 55-year-old woman experienced the reaction after eating goat’s cheese, which researchers say was triggered by the repeated use several months earlier of a moisturizer that contained goat’s milk.

    Prof. Robyn O’Hehir, Director of Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, at Monash Univ. says many creams – even for the treatment of dry skin and eczema – are advertised as “natural” products.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98natural%E2%80%99-moisturizers-can-cause-food-allergies

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  3. Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be OverweightA study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

    Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be Overweight

    A study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.

    The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

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  5. Diabetes-linked Gene Regulates Cell’s PowerhouseA team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the Univ. of Pennsylvania found that a susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes regulates self-destruction of the cell’s energy factory. They report their findings this week in Cell.The pathway central to this gene could be targeted for prevention and control of type-1 diabetes and may extend to the treatment of other metabolic-associated diseases.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diabetes-linked-gene-regulates-cells-powerhouse

    Diabetes-linked Gene Regulates Cell’s Powerhouse

    A team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the Univ. of Pennsylvania found that a susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes regulates self-destruction of the cell’s energy factory. They report their findings this week in Cell.

    The pathway central to this gene could be targeted for prevention and control of type-1 diabetes and may extend to the treatment of other metabolic-associated diseases.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diabetes-linked-gene-regulates-cells-powerhouse

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  7. New Lab Designed for High-altitude Medical ResearchAn international laboratory for high-altitude medical research has been established in Xining City, capital of northwest China’s Qinghai Province.The lab is a joint project by Qinghai Univ. and the Univ. of Utah. Scientists from the two universities have been partners in academic exchange, personnel training and research collaboration since a cooperative agreement in April 2010.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-lab-designed-high-altitude-medical-research

    New Lab Designed for High-altitude Medical Research

    An international laboratory for high-altitude medical research has been established in Xining City, capital of northwest China’s Qinghai Province.

    The lab is a joint project by Qinghai Univ. and the Univ. of Utah. Scientists from the two universities have been partners in academic exchange, personnel training and research collaboration since a cooperative agreement in April 2010.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-lab-designed-high-altitude-medical-research

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  9. Evidence Shows Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents CancerResearch conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.According to senior author John VandeBerg, the research was driven by the fact that, despite the increasing use of sunscreen in recent decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, continues to increase dramatically. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 75,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/evidence-shows-sunscreen-use-childhood-prevents-cancer

    Evidence Shows Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents Cancer

    Research conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.

    According to senior author John VandeBerg, the research was driven by the fact that, despite the increasing use of sunscreen in recent decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, continues to increase dramatically. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 75,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/evidence-shows-sunscreen-use-childhood-prevents-cancer

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  11. Breathalyzer May Detect Deadliest CancerLung cancer causes more deaths in the U.S. than the next three most common cancers combined — colon, breast and pancreatic. The reason for the striking mortality rate is simple: poor detection. Lung cancer attacks without leaving any fingerprints, quietly afflicting its victims and metastasizing uncontrollably — to the point of no return.Now a new device developed by a team of Israeli, American and British cancer researchers may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression. The breathalyzer test, embedded with a “NaNose” nanotech chip to literally “sniff out” cancer tumors, was developed by Prof. Nir Peled of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Prof. Hossam Haick of the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology and Prof. Fred Hirsch of the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/breathalyzer-may-detect-deadliest-cancer

    Breathalyzer May Detect Deadliest Cancer

    Lung cancer causes more deaths in the U.S. than the next three most common cancers combined — colon, breast and pancreatic. The reason for the striking mortality rate is simple: poor detection. Lung cancer attacks without leaving any fingerprints, quietly afflicting its victims and metastasizing uncontrollably — to the point of no return.

    Now a new device developed by a team of Israeli, American and British cancer researchers may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression. The breathalyzer test, embedded with a “NaNose” nanotech chip to literally “sniff out” cancer tumors, was developed by Prof. Nir Peled of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Prof. Hossam Haick of the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology and Prof. Fred Hirsch of the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/breathalyzer-may-detect-deadliest-cancer

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  13. ‘Genomic Dark Matter’ Controls Airway Development It’s a long way from DNA to RNA to protein, and only about two percent of a person’s genome is eventually converted into proteins. In contrast, a much higher percentage of the genome is transcribed into RNA. What these non-protein-coding RNAs do is still relatively unknown. However, given their vast numbers in the human genome, researchers believe that they likely play important roles in normal human development and response to disease.Large-scale sequencing has allowed investigators to identify thousands of non-coding RNAs. Small non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, are known to be important players in regulating gene expression in many contexts, including tissue development. On the other hand, the function of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is less well understood.Research led by Ed Morrisey, professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine, Univ. of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has identified hundreds of these lncRNAs, sometimes called the “genomic dark matter,” that are expressed in developing and adult lungs. Their findings, described in and featured on the cover of the current issue of Genes and Development, reveal that many of these lncRNAs in the lung regulate gene expression by opening and closing the DNA scaffolding on neighboring genes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98genomic-dark-matter%E2%80%99-controls-airway-development

    ‘Genomic Dark Matter’ Controls Airway Development

    It’s a long way from DNA to RNA to protein, and only about two percent of a person’s genome is eventually converted into proteins. In contrast, a much higher percentage of the genome is transcribed into RNA. What these non-protein-coding RNAs do is still relatively unknown. However, given their vast numbers in the human genome, researchers believe that they likely play important roles in normal human development and response to disease.

    Large-scale sequencing has allowed investigators to identify thousands of non-coding RNAs. Small non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, are known to be important players in regulating gene expression in many contexts, including tissue development. On the other hand, the function of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is less well understood.

    Research led by Ed Morrisey, professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine, Univ. of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has identified hundreds of these lncRNAs, sometimes called the “genomic dark matter,” that are expressed in developing and adult lungs. Their findings, described in and featured on the cover of the current issue of Genes and Development, reveal that many of these lncRNAs in the lung regulate gene expression by opening and closing the DNA scaffolding on neighboring genes.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98genomic-dark-matter%E2%80%99-controls-airway-development

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  15. Supplements May Be Too Much for Some Older Women

    Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may actually send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 163 older (ages 57 to 90) white women whose vitamin D levels were too low. The women took calcium citrate tablets to meet their recommended intake of 1,200 mg/day, and they took various doses of vitamin D, ranging from 400 to 4,800 IU/day. The trial was limited by ethnicity because different ethnic groups metabolize calcium and vitamin D differently.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/supplements-may-be-too-much-some-older-women

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  17. Researchers Find Weakness in Antibiotic-resistant BacteriaNew research from the Univ. Of East Anglia, published in the journal Nature, reveals an Achilles’ heel in the defensive barrier that surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells.The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-find-weakness-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

    Researchers Find Weakness in Antibiotic-resistant Bacteria

    New research from the Univ. Of East Anglia, published in the journal Nature, reveals an Achilles’ heel in the defensive barrier that surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells.

    The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-find-weakness-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

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  19. No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer RiskResearchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

    No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer Risk

    Researchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

    Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

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  21. Lifestyle Diseases Rising GloballyWe can all, in general, expect to live a little longer than our grandparents did – and, until recently, many of us have had expectations to live to an older age than our own parents. In addition to living longer, our risks of disease and causes of death are changing.Data from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease survey shows that all around the world populations are shifting away from infectious diseases towards non-communicable diseases (NCDs). NCDs represent a wide range of conditions, among which the most common are heart disease, strokes and lung diseases.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/lifestyle-diseases-rising-globally

    Lifestyle Diseases Rising Globally

    We can all, in general, expect to live a little longer than our grandparents did – and, until recently, many of us have had expectations to live to an older age than our own parents. In addition to living longer, our risks of disease and causes of death are changing.

    Data from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease survey shows that all around the world populations are shifting away from infectious diseases towards non-communicable diseases (NCDs). NCDs represent a wide range of conditions, among which the most common are heart disease, strokes and lung diseases.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/lifestyle-diseases-rising-globally

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  23. Vaccine ‘Reprograms’ Cancers to Respond to Treatment

    Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and tested a vaccine that triggered the growth of immune cell nodules within pancreatic tumors, essentially reprogramming these intractable cancers and potentially making them vulnerable to immune-based therapies.

    In their study described in today’s issue of Cancer Immunology Research, the Johns Hopkins team tested the vaccine in 39 people with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer. The disease becomes resistant to standard chemotherapies and is particularly lethal, with fewer than 5 percent of patients surviving five years after their diagnosis.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/vaccine-reprograms-cancers-respond-treatment

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  25. Ban on Pavement Sealant Significantly Impacted LakeIn 2006, Austin, Texas, became the first city in the country to ban a commonly used pavement sealant over concerns that it was a major source of cancer-causing compounds in the environment. Eight years later, the city’s action seems to have made a big dent in the targeted compounds’ levels — researchers now report that the concentrations have dropped significantly. They published their study, which could have broad implications for other jurisdictions and public health, in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.Peter Van Metre and Barbara Mahler from the U.S. Geological Survey point out that in 2005, researchers figured out that pavement sealants made from coal tar were contributing high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment. This is a serious public concern because studies have shown that PAHs cause cancer in animals, and they likely impact human health as well.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/ban-pavement-sealant-significantly-impacted-lake

    Ban on Pavement Sealant Significantly Impacted Lake

    In 2006, Austin, Texas, became the first city in the country to ban a commonly used pavement sealant over concerns that it was a major source of cancer-causing compounds in the environment. Eight years later, the city’s action seems to have made a big dent in the targeted compounds’ levels — researchers now report that the concentrations have dropped significantly. They published their study, which could have broad implications for other jurisdictions and public health, in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

    Peter Van Metre and Barbara Mahler from the U.S. Geological Survey point out that in 2005, researchers figured out that pavement sealants made from coal tar were contributing high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment. This is a serious public concern because studies have shown that PAHs cause cancer in animals, and they likely impact human health as well.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/ban-pavement-sealant-significantly-impacted-lake

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  27. Stress Linked to Short-term Memory Loss

    A new study at the Univ. of Iowa reports a potential link between stress hormones and short-term memory loss in older adults. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, reveals that having high levels of cortisol — a natural hormone in our body whose levels surge when we are stressed — can lead to memory lapses as we age.

    Short-term increases in cortisol are critical for survival. They promote coping and help us respond to life’s challenges by making us more alert and able to think on our feet. But abnormally high or prolonged spikes in cortisol — like what happens when we are dealing with long-term stress — can lead to negative consequences that numerous bodies of research have shown to include digestion problems, anxiety, weight gain and high blood pressure.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/stress-linked-short-term-memory-loss

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  29. Blueprint Shows How Microorganisms Make DrugsResearchers at the Univ. of Michigan have obtained the first three-dimensional snapshots of the “assembly line” within microorganisms that naturally produces antibiotics and other drugs.Understanding the complete structure and movement within the molecular factory gives investigators a solid blueprint for redesigning the microbial assembly line to produce novel drugs of high medicinal value.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/blueprint-shows-how-microorganisms-make-drugs

    Blueprint Shows How Microorganisms Make Drugs

    Researchers at the Univ. of Michigan have obtained the first three-dimensional snapshots of the “assembly line” within microorganisms that naturally produces antibiotics and other drugs.

    Understanding the complete structure and movement within the molecular factory gives investigators a solid blueprint for redesigning the microbial assembly line to produce novel drugs of high medicinal value.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/blueprint-shows-how-microorganisms-make-drugs

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