Laboratory Equipment

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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Pure Lab Water: The Essential Lab ComponentIncreasing analytical instrumentation capabilities are expected to drive the demand for higher performance, easier-to-use and more flexible lab water systems."Ultrapure lab water is essential to research laboratory applications,” says Wayne Darsa, Director of Business Development at ELGA LabWater, Woodridge, Ill. “Often, however, it’s taken for granted even though it makes up the vast majority of reagents. In a worst case scenario, months of lab work can be called into question if inconsistencies in the ultrapure lab water source are identified in its delivery, jeopardizing published data.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/03/pure-lab-water-essential-lab-component

    Pure Lab Water: The Essential Lab Component

    Increasing analytical instrumentation capabilities are expected to drive the demand for higher performance, easier-to-use and more flexible lab water systems.

    "Ultrapure lab water is essential to research laboratory applications,” says Wayne Darsa, Director of Business Development at ELGA LabWater, Woodridge, Ill. “Often, however, it’s taken for granted even though it makes up the vast majority of reagents. In a worst case scenario, months of lab work can be called into question if inconsistencies in the ultrapure lab water source are identified in its delivery, jeopardizing published data.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/03/pure-lab-water-essential-lab-component

  2. 10 Notes
  3. The Right Supply for the Right SampleConsidering all options for liquid nitrogen supply systems, including size and safety, is critical to further the growth of cryogenic applications.The growth of storing and preserving biological materials in cryogenic liquid nitrogen freezers has resulted in many options and challenges in how to effectively supply these systems with the cryogenic liquid they require. Evaluating options, sizing and safety considerations is critical to determining the path a university laboratory or research facility should choose for implementation.In new construction of facilities where dedicated freezer storage areas can be designed into the building plan, a large low-pressure bulk liquid nitrogen supply connected to a vacuum-jacketed pipeline is typically the best option. This type of installation allows for the most cost-efficient delivery of nitrogen by the supplier and potentially the lowest evaporation loss of cryogen to the freezers because of the low-heat transfer properties of vacuum-insulated piping systems.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/02/right-supply-right-sample

    The Right Supply for the Right Sample

    Considering all options for liquid nitrogen supply systems, including size and safety, is critical to further the growth of cryogenic applications.

    The growth of storing and preserving biological materials in cryogenic liquid nitrogen freezers has resulted in many options and challenges in how to effectively supply these systems with the cryogenic liquid they require. Evaluating options, sizing and safety considerations is critical to determining the path a university laboratory or research facility should choose for implementation.

    In new construction of facilities where dedicated freezer storage areas can be designed into the building plan, a large low-pressure bulk liquid nitrogen supply connected to a vacuum-jacketed pipeline is typically the best option. This type of installation allows for the most cost-efficient delivery of nitrogen by the supplier and potentially the lowest evaporation loss of cryogen to the freezers because of the low-heat transfer properties of vacuum-insulated piping systems.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/02/right-supply-right-sample

  4. 11 Notes
  5. Faster, Better Sample Prep for FoodstuffsCentrifugal evaporation has proven itself as a fast, safe and efficient sample preparation method in the analysis of foodstuffs for prohibited antibiotics.Nitrofuran antibiotics were banned from use in the European Union (EU) in 1995 because of concerns that their residues were carcinogenic. In 2002/2003, the EU introduced a stringent testing regimen that calls for the use of highly sensitive methods to test food stuffs, principally meat, fish and shellfish, for the presence of this class of antibiotics. The Minimum Required Performance Limit (MRPL) laid down by the EU directive is 1 µg per kg for edible tissues, and is enforced on all products whether produced locally or imported into the EU. Many papers detail methods and identify metabolites and derivatives of the drugs concerned. The analytical method calls for good upstream sample preparation to eliminate the effects of the matrix, and can be manual and time consuming, particularly where evaporation is concerned. This article describes operational benefits, including workflow improvements, gained by the official food control authority of the canton of Zurich—Kantonales Labor Zurich (KLZH) —during improvement of an upstream sample preparation methodology based on Genevac’s EZ-2 Envi evaporator.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/01/faster-better-sample-prep-foodstuffs

    Faster, Better Sample Prep for Foodstuffs

    Centrifugal evaporation has proven itself as a fast, safe and efficient sample preparation method in the analysis of foodstuffs for prohibited antibiotics.

    Nitrofuran antibiotics were banned from use in the European Union (EU) in 1995 because of concerns that their residues were carcinogenic. In 2002/2003, the EU introduced a stringent testing regimen that calls for the use of highly sensitive methods to test food stuffs, principally meat, fish and shellfish, for the presence of this class of antibiotics. The Minimum Required Performance Limit (MRPL) laid down by the EU directive is 1 µg per kg for edible tissues, and is enforced on all products whether produced locally or imported into the EU. Many papers detail methods and identify metabolites and derivatives of the drugs concerned. The analytical method calls for good upstream sample preparation to eliminate the effects of the matrix, and can be manual and time consuming, particularly where evaporation is concerned. This article describes operational benefits, including workflow improvements, gained by the official food control authority of the canton of Zurich—Kantonales Labor Zurich (KLZH) —during improvement of an upstream sample preparation methodology based on Genevac’s EZ-2 Envi evaporator.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/01/faster-better-sample-prep-foodstuffs

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  7. Flexibility, Software and Ease-of-Use Drive Next-Gen Lab AutomationMaking lab automation systems usable to non-experts is becoming a driver for equipment suppliers.In today’s tight economic climate, the cost of operating a modern research lab is often considered the primary challenge for research managers and directors. One could extrapolate from that posit that, when considering the application of automation systems, the resulting reduction of costs from automation implementation would be the driving factor. But the substitution of machine systems for high-cost human operations is not the primary reason for implementing lab automation. Indeed, it’s not even the second reason, according to a recent reader survey by the editors of Laboratory Equipment.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/01/flexibility-software-and-ease-use-drive-next-gen-lab-automation

    Flexibility, Software and Ease-of-Use Drive Next-Gen Lab Automation

    Making lab automation systems usable to non-experts is becoming a driver for equipment suppliers.

    In today’s tight economic climate, the cost of operating a modern research lab is often considered the primary challenge for research managers and directors. One could extrapolate from that posit that, when considering the application of automation systems, the resulting reduction of costs from automation implementation would be the driving factor. But the substitution of machine systems for high-cost human operations is not the primary reason for implementing lab automation. Indeed, it’s not even the second reason, according to a recent reader survey by the editors of Laboratory Equipment.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/01/flexibility-software-and-ease-use-drive-next-gen-lab-automation

  8. 9 Notes
  9. Temperature Standardization Gets the Cold ShoulderLaboratories remain slow to adopt protocols and technologies that can improve and standardize temperature control in biomaterial sample handling and preservation.While research involving temperature-sensitive biomaterials has been conducted for centuries, efforts to standardize temperature control in sample processing and handling have not been widely adopted. The situation continues despite the fact that research involving temperature-sensitive biomaterials has grown exponentially in recent years. Drug developers are now increasingly targeting biologics and other therapies that are highly temperature-sensitive. Out of the top 10 global pharma products positioned for launch in 2014, seven are biologics that have stringent requirements for cold chain handling. In addition, the introduction of new assays and other diagnostic tools based on analysis of blood, plasma, tissue and other biomaterials means that more laboratories than ever are now handling biological samples. In many cases, samples must be shipped to different locations for processing or analysis, making temperature control even more challenging.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/12/temperature-standardization-gets-cold-shoulder

    Temperature Standardization Gets the Cold Shoulder

    Laboratories remain slow to adopt protocols and technologies that can improve and standardize temperature control in biomaterial sample handling and preservation.

    While research involving temperature-sensitive biomaterials has been conducted for centuries, efforts to standardize temperature control in sample processing and handling have not been widely adopted. The situation continues despite the fact that research involving temperature-sensitive biomaterials has grown exponentially in recent years. Drug developers are now increasingly targeting biologics and other therapies that are highly temperature-sensitive. Out of the top 10 global pharma products positioned for launch in 2014, seven are biologics that have stringent requirements for cold chain handling. In addition, the introduction of new assays and other diagnostic tools based on analysis of blood, plasma, tissue and other biomaterials means that more laboratories than ever are now handling biological samples. In many cases, samples must be shipped to different locations for processing or analysis, making temperature control even more challenging.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/12/temperature-standardization-gets-cold-shoulder

  10. 11 Notes
  11. Mobile Phones for Mobile LabsSmartphones have the ability to be as transformative in the lab as they have been in our personal lives.Envision a company on which millions rely for clean, safe drinking water. To deliver that vision, and ensure the region’s water is contaminant-free, the company uses a high-tech water sampling platform that relies on field technicians accurately and efficiently collecting and testing samples from reservoirs, water treatment facilities and even customers’ homes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/12/mobile-phones-mobile-labs

    Mobile Phones for Mobile Labs

    Smartphones have the ability to be as transformative in the lab as they have been in our personal lives.

    Envision a company on which millions rely for clean, safe drinking water. To deliver that vision, and ensure the region’s water is contaminant-free, the company uses a high-tech water sampling platform that relies on field technicians accurately and efficiently collecting and testing samples from reservoirs, water treatment facilities and even customers’ homes.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/12/mobile-phones-mobile-labs

  12. 12 Notes
  13. Pittcon Showcases New and Breakthrough TechnologiesGeneral lab equipment, analytical instruments and specialty life science testing devices highlight the show’s return to the Northeast.This issue of Laboratory Equipment covers the new products and technologies showcased at the 64th Annual Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (www.pittcon.org) being held in the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, Pa., on March 17 to 21, 2013. Pittcon draws more than 17,000 attendees to view the laboratory products from more than 930 exhibitors. This year is an off-year for both the Analytica and Achema conferences, so visitors will only get to see new lab products at Pittcon and possibly ArabLab in Dubai the week before Pittcon (March 10 to 13, 2013). ArabLab has about 10,000 attendees and 750 exhibitors, but less than 10% of the exhibitors at ArabLab are also at Pittcon and vice versa, so attendees at one show will see mostly uniquely new products that are not seen at the other show.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/pittcon-showcases-new-and-breakthrough-technologies

    Pittcon Showcases New and Breakthrough Technologies

    General lab equipment, analytical instruments and specialty life science testing devices highlight the show’s return to the Northeast.

    This issue of Laboratory Equipment covers the new products and technologies showcased at the 64th Annual Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (www.pittcon.org) being held in the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, Pa., on March 17 to 21, 2013. Pittcon draws more than 17,000 attendees to view the laboratory products from more than 930 exhibitors. This year is an off-year for both the Analytica and Achema conferences, so visitors will only get to see new lab products at Pittcon and possibly ArabLab in Dubai the week before Pittcon (March 10 to 13, 2013). ArabLab has about 10,000 attendees and 750 exhibitors, but less than 10% of the exhibitors at ArabLab are also at Pittcon and vice versa, so attendees at one show will see mostly uniquely new products that are not seen at the other show.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/pittcon-showcases-new-and-breakthrough-technologies

  14. 59 Notes
  15. Responding to Patient Safety Threats in the LabA public-private solution is needed to address and solve the serious risks to patient safety inherent in today’s pathology laboratory.Few would argue that patient safety in a healthcare venue should be of paramount concern. Recognizing that, the federal government is spending $1 billion to address patient safety risks such as medication errors, slips and falls and inaccuracies in charting. Still, there’s one little-known setting where patient safety can be compromised on a daily basis—a place where risk should be unacceptable, given the potential for catastrophic results: the pathology lab.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/responding-patient-safety-threats-lab

    Responding to Patient Safety Threats in the Lab

    A public-private solution is needed to address and solve the serious risks to patient safety inherent in today’s pathology laboratory.

    Few would argue that patient safety in a healthcare venue should be of paramount concern. Recognizing that, the federal government is spending $1 billion to address patient safety risks such as medication errors, slips and falls and inaccuracies in charting. Still, there’s one little-known setting where patient safety can be compromised on a daily basis—a place where risk should be unacceptable, given the potential for catastrophic results: the pathology lab.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/responding-patient-safety-threats-lab

  16. 5 Notes
  17. Certified Welding Systems Support Medical Device IndustryQuality systems for the welding of medical devices rely on a variety of set standards, including protocols, certification and federal agency compliance.A quality system rigorous enough to support the medical device industry is a necessary component of any welding company doing business in that sector. But what exactly does that include? A little bit of everything, it turns out. From IQ/OQ/PC (installation qualification/operational qualification/performance qualification) documentation, to adherence to ISO 13485 quality management standards, to compliance with FDA good manufacturing practices; quality procedures and documentation pervade the entire organization.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/certified-welding-systems-support-medical-device-industry

    Certified Welding Systems Support Medical Device Industry

    Quality systems for the welding of medical devices rely on a variety of set standards, including protocols, certification and federal agency compliance.

    A quality system rigorous enough to support the medical device industry is a necessary component of any welding company doing business in that sector. But what exactly does that include? A little bit of everything, it turns out. From IQ/OQ/PC (installation qualification/operational qualification/performance qualification) documentation, to adherence to ISO 13485 quality management standards, to compliance with FDA good manufacturing practices; quality procedures and documentation pervade the entire organization.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/certified-welding-systems-support-medical-device-industry

  18. 7 Notes
  19. A Look Back: Early Pittcon CoverageWhile Pittcon is celebrating its 64th birthday and a return to its roots in the Northeast, Laboratory Equipment is celebrating its 50th birthday with a look back at previous coverage.Laboratory Equipment magazine was first published in May 1964 as a large tabloid publication. Since then, the magazine has evolved—just as laboratory equipment has—to meet the demands of a market and take advantage of a changing technological landscape. One thing that hasn’t changed, though, is a commitment to showcasing new products and technologies, especially from one of the most important trade shows in the industry.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/look-back-early-pittcon-coverage

    A Look Back: Early Pittcon Coverage

    While Pittcon is celebrating its 64th birthday and a return to its roots in the Northeast, Laboratory Equipment is celebrating its 50th birthday with a look back at previous coverage.

    Laboratory Equipment magazine was first published in May 1964 as a large tabloid publication. Since then, the magazine has evolved—just as laboratory equipment has—to meet the demands of a market and take advantage of a changing technological landscape. One thing that hasn’t changed, though, is a commitment to showcasing new products and technologies, especially from one of the most important trade shows in the industry.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/02/look-back-early-pittcon-coverage

  20. 7 Notes
  21. Ever Faster Technological ChangeI am constantly amazed at the speed at which technology seems to be changing and how fast we’re catching up with the future. Two recent publications bring this fact home: in a Brookings Institution research article, the authors describe multiple body parts that future researchers will use to track individuals. And in “The Future Issue” (January 14, 2013) of Fortune magazine the editors document a number of future technologies and events, including an interview with one of my favorite futurists—Ray Kurzweil, on reverse engineering of the human brain.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2013/02/ever-faster-technological-change

    Ever Faster Technological Change

    I am constantly amazed at the speed at which technology seems to be changing and how fast we’re catching up with the future. Two recent publications bring this fact home: in a Brookings Institution research article, the authors describe multiple body parts that future researchers will use to track individuals. And in “The Future Issue” (January 14, 2013) of Fortune magazine the editors document a number of future technologies and events, including an interview with one of my favorite futurists—Ray Kurzweil, on reverse engineering of the human brain.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2013/02/ever-faster-technological-change

  22. 2 Notes
  23. FINAL CALL: Pittcon 2013 Product SubmissionsThe February 2013 issue of Laboratory Equipment will showcase products being featured at Pittcon 2013. This special issue offers all exhibitors the chance to submit relevant press releases for publication.Click here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/pittcon-2013-call-editorial

    FINAL CALL: Pittcon 2013 Product Submissions

    The February 2013 issue of Laboratory Equipment will showcase products being featured at Pittcon 2013. This special issue offers all exhibitors the chance to submit relevant press releases for publication.

    Click here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/pittcon-2013-call-editorial

  24. 1 Notes
  25. New Instruments Reduce Energy, Water Usage in Food ProcessesRecent developments in continuous-process cooking provide critical reductions in energy and cost savings. There are many processes in food manufacturing that can be addressed to reduce operating costs while at the same time improving sustainability. One of the most critically important objectives to achieving this is reducing process energy and water consumption. Implementing energy- and water-efficient practices and technologies should be a senior priority at system levels in food manufacturing plants. With the continual increase in energy and water costs, optimizing energy and water usage in food processing has never been a stronger issue.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/01/new-instruments-reduce-energy-water-usage-food-processes

    New Instruments Reduce Energy, Water Usage in Food Processes

    Recent developments in continuous-process cooking provide critical reductions in energy and cost savings.

    There are many processes in food manufacturing that can be addressed to reduce operating costs while at the same time improving sustainability. One of the most critically important objectives to achieving this is reducing process energy and water consumption. Implementing energy- and water-efficient practices and technologies should be a senior priority at system levels in food manufacturing plants. With the continual increase in energy and water costs, optimizing energy and water usage in food processing has never been a stronger issue.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/01/new-instruments-reduce-energy-water-usage-food-processes

  26. 12 Notes
  27. The Pervasive World of Lab AutomationFrom biobanking, electronic pipetting, labeling and analytical instruments, automation is enhancing lab productivity, reliability and accuracy.Automated operations in the research laboratory are demanded for a number of reasons. An operation that’s automated reduces the variation in a previously manual operation—and in the extreme, it can remove the contribution of human error to a process. A prime reason for automation in today’s tough economic environment is that automated systems reduce labor costs for the research lab by enabling operations to be precisely performed without human intervention and 24/7 if needed. Newer automation systems can also adapt as processes require by utilizing intelligent software.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/01/pervasive-world-lab-automation

    The Pervasive World of Lab Automation

    From biobanking, electronic pipetting, labeling and analytical instruments, automation is enhancing lab productivity, reliability and accuracy.

    Automated operations in the research laboratory are demanded for a number of reasons. An operation that’s automated reduces the variation in a previously manual operation—and in the extreme, it can remove the contribution of human error to a process. A prime reason for automation in today’s tough economic environment is that automated systems reduce labor costs for the research lab by enabling operations to be precisely performed without human intervention and 24/7 if needed. Newer automation systems can also adapt as processes require by utilizing intelligent software.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2013/01/pervasive-world-lab-automation

  28. 16 Notes
  29. Collaboration in the Information AgeCollaboration is, unfortunately, not as common as hoped for in the scientific community. Some researchers are quick to point out the detrimental effects, such as the difficulty young authors face in highlighting their work when they are four pages down on the author list, or the funding eligibility issues that may arise in such a partnership. The increase of scientific capability in non-traditional powerhouse countries, like China and Russia, raises additional concerns when it comes to data sharing. But like most things, there is a time and place for collaboration—and that’s in genomics.We’ve lived in an “omics” age ever since the Human Genome Project (HGP) yielded the first human sequencing data more than a decade ago. In 2004, the last piece of the HGP puzzle was released, and that’s when our scientific landscape started shifting. With the advent of increasingly powerful computers, better software and enhanced methods, the “omics age” has given way to what is now being called the “information age” of genetics.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2012/12/collaboration-information-age

    Collaboration in the Information Age

    Collaboration is, unfortunately, not as common as hoped for in the scientific community. Some researchers are quick to point out the detrimental effects, such as the difficulty young authors face in highlighting their work when they are four pages down on the author list, or the funding eligibility issues that may arise in such a partnership. The increase of scientific capability in non-traditional powerhouse countries, like China and Russia, raises additional concerns when it comes to data sharing. But like most things, there is a time and place for collaboration—and that’s in genomics.

    We’ve lived in an “omics” age ever since the Human Genome Project (HGP) yielded the first human sequencing data more than a decade ago. In 2004, the last piece of the HGP puzzle was released, and that’s when our scientific landscape started shifting. With the advent of increasingly powerful computers, better software and enhanced methods, the “omics age” has given way to what is now being called the “information age” of genetics.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2012/12/collaboration-information-age

  30. 5 Notes