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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be OverweightA study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

    Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be Overweight

    A study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.

    The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

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  3. Supplements May Be Too Much for Some Older Women

    Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may actually send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 163 older (ages 57 to 90) white women whose vitamin D levels were too low. The women took calcium citrate tablets to meet their recommended intake of 1,200 mg/day, and they took various doses of vitamin D, ranging from 400 to 4,800 IU/day. The trial was limited by ethnicity because different ethnic groups metabolize calcium and vitamin D differently.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/supplements-may-be-too-much-some-older-women

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  5. No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer RiskResearchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

    No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer Risk

    Researchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

    Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

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  7. Lifestyle Diseases Rising GloballyWe can all, in general, expect to live a little longer than our grandparents did – and, until recently, many of us have had expectations to live to an older age than our own parents. In addition to living longer, our risks of disease and causes of death are changing.Data from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease survey shows that all around the world populations are shifting away from infectious diseases towards non-communicable diseases (NCDs). NCDs represent a wide range of conditions, among which the most common are heart disease, strokes and lung diseases.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/lifestyle-diseases-rising-globally

    Lifestyle Diseases Rising Globally

    We can all, in general, expect to live a little longer than our grandparents did – and, until recently, many of us have had expectations to live to an older age than our own parents. In addition to living longer, our risks of disease and causes of death are changing.

    Data from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease survey shows that all around the world populations are shifting away from infectious diseases towards non-communicable diseases (NCDs). NCDs represent a wide range of conditions, among which the most common are heart disease, strokes and lung diseases.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/lifestyle-diseases-rising-globally

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  9. Ban on Pavement Sealant Significantly Impacted LakeIn 2006, Austin, Texas, became the first city in the country to ban a commonly used pavement sealant over concerns that it was a major source of cancer-causing compounds in the environment. Eight years later, the city’s action seems to have made a big dent in the targeted compounds’ levels — researchers now report that the concentrations have dropped significantly. They published their study, which could have broad implications for other jurisdictions and public health, in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.Peter Van Metre and Barbara Mahler from the U.S. Geological Survey point out that in 2005, researchers figured out that pavement sealants made from coal tar were contributing high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment. This is a serious public concern because studies have shown that PAHs cause cancer in animals, and they likely impact human health as well.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/ban-pavement-sealant-significantly-impacted-lake

    Ban on Pavement Sealant Significantly Impacted Lake

    In 2006, Austin, Texas, became the first city in the country to ban a commonly used pavement sealant over concerns that it was a major source of cancer-causing compounds in the environment. Eight years later, the city’s action seems to have made a big dent in the targeted compounds’ levels — researchers now report that the concentrations have dropped significantly. They published their study, which could have broad implications for other jurisdictions and public health, in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

    Peter Van Metre and Barbara Mahler from the U.S. Geological Survey point out that in 2005, researchers figured out that pavement sealants made from coal tar were contributing high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment. This is a serious public concern because studies have shown that PAHs cause cancer in animals, and they likely impact human health as well.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/ban-pavement-sealant-significantly-impacted-lake

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  11. FDA Preps Long-awaited Plan to Cut SaltFood companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty — a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.The Food and Drug Administration is preparing to issue voluntary guidelines asking the food industry to lower sodium levels, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg tells The Associated Press. Hamburg said in a recent interview that the sodium is “of huge interest and concern” and she hopes the guidelines will be issued “relatively soon.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/fda-preps-long-awaited-plan-cut-salt

    FDA Preps Long-awaited Plan to Cut Salt

    Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty — a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

    The Food and Drug Administration is preparing to issue voluntary guidelines asking the food industry to lower sodium levels, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg tells The Associated Press. Hamburg said in a recent interview that the sodium is “of huge interest and concern” and she hopes the guidelines will be issued “relatively soon.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/fda-preps-long-awaited-plan-cut-salt

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  13. Broccoli Sprout Beverage Enhances DetoxA clinical trial involving nearly 300 Chinese men and women residing in one of China’s most polluted regions found that daily consumption of a half cup of broccoli sprout beverage produced rapid, significant and sustained higher levels of excretion of benzene, a known human carcinogen, and acrolein, a lung irritant. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, working with colleagues at several U.S. and Chinese institutions, used the broccoli sprout beverage to provide sulforaphane, a plant compound already demonstrated to have cancer preventive properties in animal studies. The study was published in Cancer Prevention Research.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/broccoli-sprout-beverage-enhances-detox

    Broccoli Sprout Beverage Enhances Detox

    A clinical trial involving nearly 300 Chinese men and women residing in one of China’s most polluted regions found that daily consumption of a half cup of broccoli sprout beverage produced rapid, significant and sustained higher levels of excretion of benzene, a known human carcinogen, and acrolein, a lung irritant. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, working with colleagues at several U.S. and Chinese institutions, used the broccoli sprout beverage to provide sulforaphane, a plant compound already demonstrated to have cancer preventive properties in animal studies. The study was published in Cancer Prevention Research.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/broccoli-sprout-beverage-enhances-detox

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  15. Fasting Reduces Cholesterol in Prediabetic People

    For prediabetics, many interventions focus on lifestyle changes and weight loss, but new research on periodic fasting has identified a biological process in the body that converts bad cholesterol in fat cells to energy, thus combating diabetes risk factors.

    Researchers at the Intermountain Heart Institute at Intermountain Medical Center noticed that after 10 to 12 hours of time fasting, the body starts scavenging for other sources of energy throughout the body to sustain itself. The body pulls LDL (bad) cholesterol from the fat cells and uses it as energy.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/fasting-reduces-cholesterol-prediabetic-people

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  17. High Protein Diet Linked to Lower Stroke Risk

    People with diets higher in protein, especially from fish, may be less likely to have a stroke than those with diets lower in protein, according to a meta-analysis published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

    “The amount of protein that led to the reduced risk was moderate — equal to 20 grams per day,” says study author Xinfeng Liu, of Nanjing Univ. School of Medicine. “Additional, larger studies are needed before definitive recommendations can be made, but the evidence is compelling.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/high-protein-diet-linked-lower-stroke-risk

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  19. White Bread Boosts Gut’s ‘Good’ MicrobesWhite-bread lovers take heart. Scientists are now reporting that this much-maligned food seems to encourage the growth of some of our most helpful inhabitants — beneficial gut bacteria. In addition to this surprising find, their study in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry also revealed that when looking at effects of food on our “microbiomes,” considering the whole diet, not just individual ingredients, is critical.Sonia González and colleagues note that the bacteria in our guts, or our microbiome, play an important role in our health. When certain populations of bacteria drop, people become more prone to disease. One of the most effective ways to maintain a good balance of the microbes living in our guts is through our diets.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/white-bread-boosts-gut%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%98good%E2%80%99-microbes

    White Bread Boosts Gut’s ‘Good’ Microbes

    White-bread lovers take heart. Scientists are now reporting that this much-maligned food seems to encourage the growth of some of our most helpful inhabitants — beneficial gut bacteria. In addition to this surprising find, their study in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry also revealed that when looking at effects of food on our “microbiomes,” considering the whole diet, not just individual ingredients, is critical.

    Sonia González and colleagues note that the bacteria in our guts, or our microbiome, play an important role in our health. When certain populations of bacteria drop, people become more prone to disease. One of the most effective ways to maintain a good balance of the microbes living in our guts is through our diets.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/white-bread-boosts-gut%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%98good%E2%80%99-microbes

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  21. Seminary: It’s Religious Duty to Fight Climate Change

    The trustees of Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York have voted unanimously to begin divesting fossil fuels from the school’s entire $108.4 million endowment, becoming the world’s first seminary to take this dramatic step in the fight against global climate change.

    “Scripture tells us that all of the world is God’s precious creation, and our place within it is to care for and respect the health of the whole,” says Union President Serene Jones. “As a seminary dedicated to social justice, we have a critical call to live out our values in the world. Climate change poses a catastrophic threat, and as stewards of God’s creation we simply must act.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/seminary-it%E2%80%99s-religious-duty-fight-climate-change

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  23. Red Meat May Be Linked to Breast CancerWomen who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.Doctors have long warned that a diet loaded with red meat is linked to cancers including those of the colon and pancreas, but there has been less evidence for its role in breast cancer.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/red-meat-may-be-linked-breast-cancer

    Red Meat May Be Linked to Breast Cancer

    Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.

    Doctors have long warned that a diet loaded with red meat is linked to cancers including those of the colon and pancreas, but there has been less evidence for its role in breast cancer.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/red-meat-may-be-linked-breast-cancer

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  25. Most Breast Cancer Patients Don’t Get Enough Exercise

    Physical activity after breast cancer diagnosis has been linked with prolonged survival and improved quality of life, but most participants in a large breast cancer study did not meet national physical activity guidelines after they were diagnosed.

    Moreover, African-American women were less likely to meet the guidelines than white women. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that efforts to promote physical activity in breast cancer patients may need to be significantly enhanced.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/most-breast-cancer-patients-dont-get-enough-exercise

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  27. Humanity’s Environmental Footprint Isn’t SustainableSubstantial, fundamental changes in the world economy are required to reduce humanity’s overall environmental footprint to a sustainable level. This is the conclusion of Arjen Hoekstra, professor of Water Management at the Univ. of Twente. He has published his findings in Science.Hoekstra, mainly known for his work on the water footprint, has published the research together with his counterpart Thomas Wiedmann, from the Univ. of New South Wales in Australia. In Science, the authors describe how intertwined the global economy, politics, consumption and trade are in their effect on global land, water and raw material consumption and on the climate.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/humanitys-environmental-footprint-isnt-sustainable

    Humanity’s Environmental Footprint Isn’t Sustainable

    Substantial, fundamental changes in the world economy are required to reduce humanity’s overall environmental footprint to a sustainable level. This is the conclusion of Arjen Hoekstra, professor of Water Management at the Univ. of Twente. He has published his findings in Science.

    Hoekstra, mainly known for his work on the water footprint, has published the research together with his counterpart Thomas Wiedmann, from the Univ. of New South Wales in Australia. In Science, the authors describe how intertwined the global economy, politics, consumption and trade are in their effect on global land, water and raw material consumption and on the climate.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/humanitys-environmental-footprint-isnt-sustainable

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  29. Health, Lifestyle Linked to Memory Problems in Young Adults

    If you’re depressed, don’t get enough exercise or have high blood pressure, you may find yourself complaining more about memory problems, even if you’re a young adult, according to a new UCLA study.

    UCLA researchers and the Gallup organization polled more than 18,000 people about their memory and a variety of lifestyle and health factors previously shown to increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. They found that many of these risk factors increased the likelihood of self-perceived memory complaints across all adult age groups.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/health-lifestyle-linked-memory-problems-young-adults

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