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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Many Considerations Needed for Water Conservation StrategyIn April, California Gov. Jerry Brown issued an executive order asking residents to reduce their water consumption by 20 percent. That hasn’t happened. Since then, the state’s dry conditions have worsened, with more than 80 percent of California now in an extreme drought according to the National Weather Service.As a result, officials are getting tough on water wasters: The State Water Resources Control Board recently adopted regulations giving local agencies the authority to fine those who waste water up to $500 a day. But efforts to hit Brown’s target might have unintended, and potentially harmful, consequences for the health of Californians and their communities.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/many-considerations-needed-water-conservation-strategy

    Many Considerations Needed for Water Conservation Strategy

    In April, California Gov. Jerry Brown issued an executive order asking residents to reduce their water consumption by 20 percent. That hasn’t happened. Since then, the state’s dry conditions have worsened, with more than 80 percent of California now in an extreme drought according to the National Weather Service.

    As a result, officials are getting tough on water wasters: The State Water Resources Control Board recently adopted regulations giving local agencies the authority to fine those who waste water up to $500 a day. But efforts to hit Brown’s target might have unintended, and potentially harmful, consequences for the health of Californians and their communities.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/many-considerations-needed-water-conservation-strategy

  2. 52 Notes
  3. Almost Half of All Languages May Be EndangeredSometime in the 1970s, a linguist named James Rementer, moved into the house of an elderly woman in Oklahoma. That woman, Nora Thompson Dean, was one of the last persons to speak Unami, a dialect of the Delaware (Lenni Lenape) language. When she died in 1984, the language spoken by the Native Americans who left their place names all over New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, and signed the famous peace treaty with William Penn in 1683, went silent.Thousands of languages have gone extinct in the last few centuries, and an economist at Case Western Reserve Univ. thinks the language of any people whose total population is fewer than 35,000, is possibly endangered. That does not mean they will disappear, said David Clingingsmith. “I think that’s what the data says on average.”There are approximately 7,000 languages in the world, and 95 percent of the world’s population speak 300 of them. Half the world speaks the largest 16. According to the Endangered Languages Project, some 40 percent of the world’s languages are threatened.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/almost-half-all-languages-may-be-endangered

    Almost Half of All Languages May Be Endangered

    Sometime in the 1970s, a linguist named James Rementer, moved into the house of an elderly woman in Oklahoma. That woman, Nora Thompson Dean, was one of the last persons to speak Unami, a dialect of the Delaware (Lenni Lenape) language. When she died in 1984, the language spoken by the Native Americans who left their place names all over New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, and signed the famous peace treaty with William Penn in 1683, went silent.

    Thousands of languages have gone extinct in the last few centuries, and an economist at Case Western Reserve Univ. thinks the language of any people whose total population is fewer than 35,000, is possibly endangered. That does not mean they will disappear, said David Clingingsmith. “I think that’s what the data says on average.”

    There are approximately 7,000 languages in the world, and 95 percent of the world’s population speak 300 of them. Half the world speaks the largest 16. According to the Endangered Languages Project, some 40 percent of the world’s languages are threatened.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/almost-half-all-languages-may-be-endangered

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  5. Hatha Yoga Boosts Brain Function in Older AdultsPracticing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults’ performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report.The findings involved 108 adults between the ages of 55 and 79 years of age, 61 of whom attended hatha yoga classes. The others met for the same number and length of sessions and engaged in stretching and toning exercises instead of yoga.At the end of the eight weeks, the yoga group was speedier and more accurate on tests of information recall, mental flexibility and task-switching than it had been before the intervention. The stretching-and-toning group saw no significant change in cognitive performance over time. The differences seen between the groups were not the result of differences in age, gender, social status or other demographic factors, the research team reported.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/hatha-yoga-boosts-brain-function-older-adults

    Hatha Yoga Boosts Brain Function in Older Adults

    Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults’ performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report.

    The findings involved 108 adults between the ages of 55 and 79 years of age, 61 of whom attended hatha yoga classes. The others met for the same number and length of sessions and engaged in stretching and toning exercises instead of yoga.

    At the end of the eight weeks, the yoga group was speedier and more accurate on tests of information recall, mental flexibility and task-switching than it had been before the intervention. The stretching-and-toning group saw no significant change in cognitive performance over time. The differences seen between the groups were not the result of differences in age, gender, social status or other demographic factors, the research team reported.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/hatha-yoga-boosts-brain-function-older-adults

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  7. Surfing Helps Cystic Fibrosis PatientsFor three of Rob and Paulette Montelone’s five kids, spending the summer surfing is more than just a fun activity. It could also extend their lives.The Montelone siblings are part of a growing number of people with cystic fibrosis who are taking advantage of the health benefits that come with surfing. Since researchers realized that the salt water in the ocean helps clear out the thick mucus that builds up in patients’ lungs, organizations have started around the world that teach those with the disease how to hang 10.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/surfing-helps-cystic-fibrosis-patients

    Surfing Helps Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    For three of Rob and Paulette Montelone’s five kids, spending the summer surfing is more than just a fun activity. It could also extend their lives.

    The Montelone siblings are part of a growing number of people with cystic fibrosis who are taking advantage of the health benefits that come with surfing. Since researchers realized that the salt water in the ocean helps clear out the thick mucus that builds up in patients’ lungs, organizations have started around the world that teach those with the disease how to hang 10.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/surfing-helps-cystic-fibrosis-patients

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  9. Peers, Not Peer Pressure, Key to Drug MisuseDoctors and nurses fighting Ebola in West Africa are working 14-hour days, seven days a week, wearing head-to-toe gear in the heat of muddy clinics. Agonizing death is the norm for their patients. The hellish conditions aren’t the only problem: health workers struggle to convince patients they’re trying to help them, not hurt them.Rumors are rife that Western aid workers are importing Ebola, stealing bodies or even deliberately infecting patients. Winning trust is made harder by a full suit of hood, goggles, mask and gown that hides their faces.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/ebola-health-workers-fight-heat-rumors

    Peers, Not Peer Pressure, Key to Drug Misuse

    Doctors and nurses fighting Ebola in West Africa are working 14-hour days, seven days a week, wearing head-to-toe gear in the heat of muddy clinics. Agonizing death is the norm for their patients. The hellish conditions aren’t the only problem: health workers struggle to convince patients they’re trying to help them, not hurt them.

    Rumors are rife that Western aid workers are importing Ebola, stealing bodies or even deliberately infecting patients. Winning trust is made harder by a full suit of hood, goggles, mask and gown that hides their faces.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/ebola-health-workers-fight-heat-rumors

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  11. Ebola Health Workers Fight Heat, RumorsDoctors and nurses fighting Ebola in West Africa are working 14-hour days, seven days a week, wearing head-to-toe gear in the heat of muddy clinics. Agonizing death is the norm for their patients. The hellish conditions aren’t the only problem: health workers struggle to convince patients they’re trying to help them, not hurt them.Rumors are rife that Western aid workers are importing Ebola, stealing bodies or even deliberately infecting patients. Winning trust is made harder by a full suit of hood, goggles, mask and gown that hides their faces.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/ebola-health-workers-fight-heat-rumors

    Ebola Health Workers Fight Heat, Rumors

    Doctors and nurses fighting Ebola in West Africa are working 14-hour days, seven days a week, wearing head-to-toe gear in the heat of muddy clinics. Agonizing death is the norm for their patients. The hellish conditions aren’t the only problem: health workers struggle to convince patients they’re trying to help them, not hurt them.

    Rumors are rife that Western aid workers are importing Ebola, stealing bodies or even deliberately infecting patients. Winning trust is made harder by a full suit of hood, goggles, mask and gown that hides their faces.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/ebola-health-workers-fight-heat-rumors

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  13. Study Blames Humans for Melting GlaciersMore than two-thirds of the recent rapid melting of the world’s glaciers can be blamed on humans, a new study finds.Scientists looking at glacier melt since 1851 didn’t see a human fingerprint until about the middle of the 20th century. Even then only one-quarter of the warming wasn’t from natural causes. But since 1991, about 69 percent of the rapidly increasing melt was man-made, said Ben Marzeion, a climate scientist at the Univ. of Innsbruck.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/study-blames-humans-melting-glaciers

    Study Blames Humans for Melting Glaciers

    More than two-thirds of the recent rapid melting of the world’s glaciers can be blamed on humans, a new study finds.

    Scientists looking at glacier melt since 1851 didn’t see a human fingerprint until about the middle of the 20th century. Even then only one-quarter of the warming wasn’t from natural causes. But since 1991, about 69 percent of the rapidly increasing melt was man-made, said Ben Marzeion, a climate scientist at the Univ. of Innsbruck.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/study-blames-humans-melting-glaciers

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  15. Controversial Study Says Salt’s OKA large international study questions the conventional wisdom that most people should cut back on salt, suggesting that the amount most folks consume is OK for heart health — and too little may be as bad as too much. The findings came under immediate attack by other scientists.Limiting salt is still important for people with high blood pressure — and in fact, a second study estimates that too much sodium contributes to up to 1.65 million deaths each year. The studies both have strengths and weaknesses, and come as the U.S. government is preparing to nudge industry to trim sodium in processed and restaurant foods.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/controversial-study-says-salt%E2%80%99s-ok

    Controversial Study Says Salt’s OK

    A large international study questions the conventional wisdom that most people should cut back on salt, suggesting that the amount most folks consume is OK for heart health — and too little may be as bad as too much. The findings came under immediate attack by other scientists.

    Limiting salt is still important for people with high blood pressure — and in fact, a second study estimates that too much sodium contributes to up to 1.65 million deaths each year. The studies both have strengths and weaknesses, and come as the U.S. government is preparing to nudge industry to trim sodium in processed and restaurant foods.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/controversial-study-says-salt%E2%80%99s-ok

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  17. Egyptians Mummified the Dead Earlier than ThoughtResearchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.The scientific findings of an 11-year study by a researcher in the Department of Archaeology at York, York’s BioArCh facility and an Egyptologist from the Department of Ancient History at Macquarie Univ., push back the origins of a central and vital facet of ancient Egyptian culture by over a millennium.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/egyptians-mummified-dead-earlier-thought

    Egyptians Mummified the Dead Earlier than Thought

    Researchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.

    The scientific findings of an 11-year study by a researcher in the Department of Archaeology at York, York’s BioArCh facility and an Egyptologist from the Department of Ancient History at Macquarie Univ., push back the origins of a central and vital facet of ancient Egyptian culture by over a millennium.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/egyptians-mummified-dead-earlier-thought

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  19. Music Rewires the BrainEven old jokes can have a scientific basis in fact.You know the one about the tourist who stops a native New Yorker on the street and asks, “Excuse me sir, but how do you get to Carnegie Hall?”"Practice, practice, practice."That New Yorker is absolutely correct. Scientists have found that the brains of professional musicians are physiologically different from the brains of other people, and they got that way mostly because of practice, practice, practice.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/music-rewires-brain

    Music Rewires the Brain

    Even old jokes can have a scientific basis in fact.

    You know the one about the tourist who stops a native New Yorker on the street and asks, “Excuse me sir, but how do you get to Carnegie Hall?”

    "Practice, practice, practice."

    That New Yorker is absolutely correct. Scientists have found that the brains of professional musicians are physiologically different from the brains of other people, and they got that way mostly because of practice, practice, practice.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/music-rewires-brain

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  21. Experts Consider Role of Robots in Future of Jobs

    The vast majority of respondents to the 2014 Future of the Internet canvassing anticipate that robotics and artificial intelligence will permeate wide segments of daily life by 2025, with huge implications for a range of industries such as health care, transport and logistics, customer service and home maintenance. But even as they are largely consistent in their predictions for the evolution of technology itself, they are deeply divided on how advances in AI and robotics will impact the economic and employment picture over the next decade.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/experts-consider-role-robots-future-jobs

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  23. More Exercise is Not Always BetterThere is strong epidemiological evidence of the importance of regular physical activity, such as brisk walking and jogging, in the management and rehabilitation of cardiovascular disease and in lowering the risk of death from other diseases such as hypertension, stroke and type 2 diabetes. The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends about 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity exercise or about 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise. But there is clear evidence of an increase in cardiovascular deaths in heart attack survivors who exercise to excess, according to a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings published by Elsevier Health Sciences.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/more-exercise-not-always-better

    More Exercise is Not Always Better

    There is strong epidemiological evidence of the importance of regular physical activity, such as brisk walking and jogging, in the management and rehabilitation of cardiovascular disease and in lowering the risk of death from other diseases such as hypertension, stroke and type 2 diabetes. The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends about 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity exercise or about 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise. But there is clear evidence of an increase in cardiovascular deaths in heart attack survivors who exercise to excess, according to a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings published by Elsevier Health Sciences.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/more-exercise-not-always-better

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  25. Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be OverweightA study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

    Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be Overweight

    A study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.

    The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

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  27. Supplements May Be Too Much for Some Older Women

    Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may actually send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 163 older (ages 57 to 90) white women whose vitamin D levels were too low. The women took calcium citrate tablets to meet their recommended intake of 1,200 mg/day, and they took various doses of vitamin D, ranging from 400 to 4,800 IU/day. The trial was limited by ethnicity because different ethnic groups metabolize calcium and vitamin D differently.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/supplements-may-be-too-much-some-older-women

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  29. No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer RiskResearchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

    No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer Risk

    Researchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

    Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

  30. 36 Notes