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  1. Images of the Week: Super Moon Lit World’s Sky

    People around the world this weekend looked up at the sky to view a lunar phenomenon: the super moon. Here are a few amazing pictures of the event.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/images-week-super-moon-lit-worlds-sky

  2. 21 Notes
  3. Computer Can ID Bio-parentsA Univ. of Central Florida research team has developed a facial recognition tool that promises to be useful in rapidly matching pictures of children with their biological parents and in potentially identifying photos of missing children as they age.The work verifies that a computer is capable of matching pictures of parents and their children. The study will be presented at the nation’s premier event for the science of computer vision – the IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference in Columbus, Ohio, which begins Monday, June 23.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/computer-can-id-bio-parents

    Computer Can ID Bio-parents

    A Univ. of Central Florida research team has developed a facial recognition tool that promises to be useful in rapidly matching pictures of children with their biological parents and in potentially identifying photos of missing children as they age.

    The work verifies that a computer is capable of matching pictures of parents and their children. The study will be presented at the nation’s premier event for the science of computer vision – the IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference in Columbus, Ohio, which begins Monday, June 23.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/computer-can-id-bio-parents

  4. 16 Notes
  5. Image of the Week: Science Yields Beautiful ImagesA fantastical umbrella, a flowing robe of snowflakes and a nanoworld from a galaxy far, far away were the top winners in the sixth annual CHANL Scientific Art Competition.The Chapel Hill Analytical and Nanofabrication Laboratory sponsors the competition. Departments from across campus submitted images, and a vote by attendees at the UNC Science Expo resulted in the selection of the top three as People’s Choice Award winners.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/image-week-science-yields-beautiful-images

    Image of the Week: Science Yields Beautiful Images

    A fantastical umbrella, a flowing robe of snowflakes and a nanoworld from a galaxy far, far away were the top winners in the sixth annual CHANL Scientific Art Competition.

    The Chapel Hill Analytical and Nanofabrication Laboratory sponsors the competition. Departments from across campus submitted images, and a vote by attendees at the UNC Science Expo resulted in the selection of the top three as People’s Choice Award winners.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/image-week-science-yields-beautiful-images

  6. 19 Notes
  7. Computer Aims to Picture Everything In today’s digitally driven world, access to information appears limitless. But, when you have something specific in mind that you don’t know, like the name of that niche kitchen tool you saw at a friend’s house, it can be surprisingly hard to sift through the volume of information online and know how to search for it. Or, the opposite problem can occur – we can look up anything on the Internet, but how can we be sure we are finding everything about the topic without spending hours in front of the computer?Computer scientists from the Univ. of Washington and the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle have created the first fully automated computer program that teaches everything there is to know about any visual concept. Called Learning Everything about Anything, or LEVAN, the program searches millions of books and images on the Web to learn all possible variations of a concept, then displays the results to users as a comprehensive, browsable list of images, helping them explore and understand topics quickly in great detail.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/computer-aims-picture-everything

    Computer Aims to Picture Everything

    In today’s digitally driven world, access to information appears limitless. But, when you have something specific in mind that you don’t know, like the name of that niche kitchen tool you saw at a friend’s house, it can be surprisingly hard to sift through the volume of information online and know how to search for it. Or, the opposite problem can occur – we can look up anything on the Internet, but how can we be sure we are finding everything about the topic without spending hours in front of the computer?

    Computer scientists from the Univ. of Washington and the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle have created the first fully automated computer program that teaches everything there is to know about any visual concept. Called Learning Everything about Anything, or LEVAN, the program searches millions of books and images on the Web to learn all possible variations of a concept, then displays the results to users as a comprehensive, browsable list of images, helping them explore and understand topics quickly in great detail.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/computer-aims-picture-everything

  8. 11 Notes
  9. Algorithm Brings Artistic Touch to Your Phone

    Celebrated portrait photographers like Richard Avedon, Diane Arbus and Martin Schoeller made their reputations with distinctive visual styles that sometimes required the careful control of lighting possible only in the studio.

    Now, MIT researchers, and their colleagues at Adobe Systems and the Univ. of Virginia, have developed an algorithm that could allow you to transfer those distinctive styles to your own cellphone photos. They’ll present their findings in August at Siggraph, the premier graphics conference.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/05/algorithm-brings-artistic-touch-your-phone

  10. 11 Notes
  11. Image of the Week: Researcher Captures Invisible Networks in PhotosInvisible wireless networks are transformed into beautiful beams of color in a series of photographs. The images, created by Newcastle Univ. researcher Luis Hernan, show the “specters” of wireless networks sweeping, swirling and swooping around a ghostly figure.They were produced as part of Luis’s Digital Ethereal project, which aims to bring the invisible world around us to life. Luis Hernan, who is studying for a PhD in Architecture and Interaction Design, became fascinated with the idea of being able to see the hidden wireless networks which surround us.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/image-week-researcher-captures-invisible-networks-photos

    Image of the Week: Researcher Captures Invisible Networks in Photos

    Invisible wireless networks are transformed into beautiful beams of color in a series of photographs. The images, created by Newcastle Univ. researcher Luis Hernan, show the “specters” of wireless networks sweeping, swirling and swooping around a ghostly figure.

    They were produced as part of Luis’s Digital Ethereal project, which aims to bring the invisible world around us to life. Luis Hernan, who is studying for a PhD in Architecture and Interaction Design, became fascinated with the idea of being able to see the hidden wireless networks which surround us.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/image-week-researcher-captures-invisible-networks-photos

  12. 20 Notes
  13. Glasses-free 3-D Projector Also Improves 2-D Video

    Over the past three years, researchers in the Camera Culture group at the MIT Media Lab have steadily refined a design for a glasses-free, multiperspective, 3-D video screen, which they hope could provide a cheaper, more practical alternative to holographic video in the short term.

    Now, they’ve designed a projector that exploits the same technology, which they’ll unveil at this year’s Siggraph, the major conference in computer graphics. The projector can also improve the resolution and contrast of conventional video, which could make it an attractive transitional technology as content producers gradually learn to harness the potential of multiperspective 3-D.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/05/glasses-free-3-d-projector-also-improves-2-d-video

  14. 16 Notes
  15. Camera Produces Best-ever Image of Distant PlanetThe hunt for planets in faraway solar systems has taken another step forward with the debut of a new planet-detecting instrument led by a Stanford physicist.The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) has set a high standard for itself: the first image snapped by its camera produced the best-ever direct photo of a planet outside our solar system.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/camera-produces-best-ever-image-distant-planet

    Camera Produces Best-ever Image of Distant Planet

    The hunt for planets in faraway solar systems has taken another step forward with the debut of a new planet-detecting instrument led by a Stanford physicist.

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) has set a high standard for itself: the first image snapped by its camera produced the best-ever direct photo of a planet outside our solar system.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/camera-produces-best-ever-image-distant-planet

  16. 59 Notes
  17. Algorithm Helps Computers ID Actions Efficiently

    With the commodification of digital cameras, digital video has become so easy to produce that human beings can have trouble keeping up with it. Among the tools that computer scientists are developing to make the profusion of video more useful are algorithms for activity recognition — or determining what the people on camera are doing.

    At the Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition in June, Hamed Pirsiavash, a postdoc at MIT, and his former thesis advisor, Deva Ramanan of UC Irvine, will present a new activity-recognition algorithm that has several advantages over its predecessors.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/algorithm-helps-computers-id-actions-efficiently

  18. 7 Notes
  19. Image of the Week: Jatobá RiverThis photo, taken by Elbiogoncalves, shows the crystal clear waters of the Jatobá River, located in Ceará, Brazil.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/image-week-jatob%C3%A1-river

    Image of the Week: Jatobá River

    This photo, taken by Elbiogoncalves, shows the crystal clear waters of the Jatobá River, located in Ceará, Brazil.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/image-week-jatob%C3%A1-river

  20. 21 Notes
  21. Research Bridges Smartphones, Digital Cameras DivideDespite an addiction to taking pictures everywhere they go, cellphone junkies have not been able to ditch their stand-alone cameras quite yet. Smartphones still don’t possess the sharp zoom capabilities of digital still cameras, so the resulting pictures can be messy and out-of-focus.That won’t be the case for long, however. Prof. David Mendlovic of Tel Aviv Univ.’s School of Electrical Engineering and his former doctoral student, Gal Shabtay, who together established the startup Corephotonics, have now successfully bridged the gap between the cellphone camera and the digital still camera, developing a smartphone camera with high-quality zoom capabilities. The solution is based on a cutting-edge lightweight cellular camera that uses a two-lens approach to produce sharper images.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/research-bridges-smartphones-digital-cameras-divide

    Research Bridges Smartphones, Digital Cameras Divide

    Despite an addiction to taking pictures everywhere they go, cellphone junkies have not been able to ditch their stand-alone cameras quite yet. Smartphones still don’t possess the sharp zoom capabilities of digital still cameras, so the resulting pictures can be messy and out-of-focus.

    That won’t be the case for long, however. Prof. David Mendlovic of Tel Aviv Univ.’s School of Electrical Engineering and his former doctoral student, Gal Shabtay, who together established the startup Corephotonics, have now successfully bridged the gap between the cellphone camera and the digital still camera, developing a smartphone camera with high-quality zoom capabilities. The solution is based on a cutting-edge lightweight cellular camera that uses a two-lens approach to produce sharper images.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/research-bridges-smartphones-digital-cameras-divide

  22. 8 Notes
  23. Paleontologists Present Online Showcase of 3-D Fossils

    More than two decades ago, Univ. of Michigan paleontologist Daniel Fisher and some of his students began the laborious task of digitally scanning the bones of mastodons, mammoths and other prehistoric creatures so the images could be displayed on computers.

    Fisher hoped to someday create a digital showcase where 3-D images of specimens from the U-M Museum of Paleontology’s vast collection could be shared with other researchers and with the general public. Sadly, the technology needed to make that dream a reality just didn’t exist at the time.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/05/paleontologists-present-online-showcase-3-d-fossils

  24. 9 Notes
  25. Image of the Week: Table MountainThis photo, taken by Julien Carnot, shows Table Mountain as seen from Cape Town harbor’s jetty. Table Mountain, or Tafelberg in Afrikaans, is a flat-topped mountain forming a prominent landmark overlooking the city of Cape Town in South Africa, and is featured in the Flag of Cape Town and other local government insignia.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-table-mountain

    Image of the Week: Table Mountain

    This photo, taken by Julien Carnot, shows Table Mountain as seen from Cape Town harbor’s jetty. Table Mountain, or Tafelberg in Afrikaans, is a flat-topped mountain forming a prominent landmark overlooking the city of Cape Town in South Africa, and is featured in the Flag of Cape Town and other local government insignia.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-table-mountain

  26. 10 Notes
  27. Image of the Week: There is No Biodiversity CrisisA Univ. of St Andrews study has found that — despite fears of a biodiversity crisis — there has, in fact, not been a consistent drop in numbers of species found locally around the world.Instead, in a study of 100 communities and a total of 35,000 species that span from trees to starfish, scientists found a consistent change in which species are found in any one place. The researchers, who were surprised by the findings, say that the study should not detract from the threat many of the world’s species are under, but that policy-makers should focus on changes in biodiversity composition as well as loss.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-there-no-biodiversity-crisis

    Image of the Week: There is No Biodiversity Crisis

    A Univ. of St Andrews study has found that — despite fears of a biodiversity crisis — there has, in fact, not been a consistent drop in numbers of species found locally around the world.

    Instead, in a study of 100 communities and a total of 35,000 species that span from trees to starfish, scientists found a consistent change in which species are found in any one place. The researchers, who were surprised by the findings, say that the study should not detract from the threat many of the world’s species are under, but that policy-makers should focus on changes in biodiversity composition as well as loss.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-there-no-biodiversity-crisis

  28. 44 Notes
  29. Image of the Week: How to Wash Eyes in SpaceWe all know what to do if something harmful splashes into our eyes: wash with lots of water. As with many things in space, however, a simple operation on Earth can become quite complicated when floating around in weightlessness.Imagine you are an astronaut on the International Space Station and a fleck of dust gets in your eye or you accidently splash chili sauce or something even worse in there. Where do you get the water from and how do you rinse your eyes? There are no flowing-water taps and even if there were cupping water in your hands is impossible in zero-gravity.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-how-wash-eyes-space

    Image of the Week: How to Wash Eyes in Space

    We all know what to do if something harmful splashes into our eyes: wash with lots of water. As with many things in space, however, a simple operation on Earth can become quite complicated when floating around in weightlessness.

    Imagine you are an astronaut on the International Space Station and a fleck of dust gets in your eye or you accidently splash chili sauce or something even worse in there. Where do you get the water from and how do you rinse your eyes? There are no flowing-water taps and even if there were cupping water in your hands is impossible in zero-gravity.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-how-wash-eyes-space

  30. 34 Notes