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  1. Preserved Blood is Didn’t Belong to Louis XVI The results of an international study, which included researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), indicate that the DNA recovered from the inside of a pumpkin, previously attributed to the French King Louis XVI, does not actually belong to the monarch, guillotined in 1793. Complete genome sequencing suggests that blood remains correspond to a short male with brown eyes, Louis XVI had blue eyes and was tall. The work has been published in the Scientific Reports journal.CSIC researcher Carles Lalueza-Fox, from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology, explains, “When the Y chromosome of three living Bourbons was decoded, and we saw that it did not match with the DNA recovered from the pumpkin in 2010, we decided to sequence the complete genome and to make a functional interpretationpola in order to see if the blood could actually belong to Louis XVI.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/preserved-blood-didnt-belong-louis-xvi

    Preserved Blood is Didn’t Belong to Louis XVI

    The results of an international study, which included researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), indicate that the DNA recovered from the inside of a pumpkin, previously attributed to the French King Louis XVI, does not actually belong to the monarch, guillotined in 1793. Complete genome sequencing suggests that blood remains correspond to a short male with brown eyes, Louis XVI had blue eyes and was tall. The work has been published in the Scientific Reports journal.

    CSIC researcher Carles Lalueza-Fox, from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology, explains, “When the Y chromosome of three living Bourbons was decoded, and we saw that it did not match with the DNA recovered from the pumpkin in 2010, we decided to sequence the complete genome and to make a functional interpretationpola in order to see if the blood could actually belong to Louis XVI.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/preserved-blood-didnt-belong-louis-xvi

  2. 11 Notes
  3. Archaeologists, Tribe Clash Over Remains

    Archaeologists and Native Americans are clashing over Indian remains and artifacts that were excavated during a construction project in the San Francisco Bay Area, but then reburied at an undisclosed location.

    Archaeologists say the burial ground and village site in Larkspur held a treasure trove of information about Coast Miwok life and should have been preserved for future study.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/archaeologists-tribe-clash-over-remains

  4. 5 Notes
  5. Shifting Sea Level Influenced Galapagos’ DiversityThe birds and reptiles that inhabit the Galapagos Islands famously provided Charles Darwin with key insights into evolution by natural selection, but there’s been little research into how the animals came to be distributed across the different islands.Now a new study suggests that rising and falling sea levels played a key role in the distribution of species across the Galapagos by repeatedly connecting and then isolating the 16 equatorial islands.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/shifting-sea-level-influenced-galapagos-diversity

    Shifting Sea Level Influenced Galapagos’ Diversity

    The birds and reptiles that inhabit the Galapagos Islands famously provided Charles Darwin with key insights into evolution by natural selection, but there’s been little research into how the animals came to be distributed across the different islands.

    Now a new study suggests that rising and falling sea levels played a key role in the distribution of species across the Galapagos by repeatedly connecting and then isolating the 16 equatorial islands.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/shifting-sea-level-influenced-galapagos-diversity

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  7. Iron Curtain Still Separates Europe for DeerThe Iron Curtain was traced by an electrified barbed-wire fence that isolated the communist world from the West.It was an impenetrable Cold War barrier — and for some inhabitants of the Czech Republic it still is. Deer still balk at crossing the border with Germany even though the physical fence came down a quarter century ago, new studies show.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/iron-curtain-still-separates-europe-deer

    Iron Curtain Still Separates Europe for Deer

    The Iron Curtain was traced by an electrified barbed-wire fence that isolated the communist world from the West.

    It was an impenetrable Cold War barrier — and for some inhabitants of the Czech Republic it still is. Deer still balk at crossing the border with Germany even though the physical fence came down a quarter century ago, new studies show.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/iron-curtain-still-separates-europe-deer

  8. 35 Notes
  9. Today in Lab History: April 23, 1981- Artificial SkinOn April 23, 1981, artificial skin was first transplanted in the U.S. on patients at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The combination of cowhide, shark cartilage and plastic was developed by Ioannis Yannas and a research team at MIT. This material makes possible the treatment of burn patients whose injuries might otherwise be fatal.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-artificial-skin

    Today in Lab History: April 23, 1981- Artificial Skin

    On April 23, 1981, artificial skin was first transplanted in the U.S. on patients at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The combination of cowhide, shark cartilage and plastic was developed by Ioannis Yannas and a research team at MIT. This material makes possible the treatment of burn patients whose injuries might otherwise be fatal.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-artificial-skin

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  11. Krypton Accurately Dates Antarctic IceA team of scientists has successfully identified the age of 120,000-year-old Antarctic ice using radiometric krypton dating – a new technique that may allow them to locate and date ice that is more than a million years old.The ability to discover ancient ice is critical, the researchers say, because it will allow them to reconstruct the climate much farther back into Earth’s history and potentially understand the mechanisms that have triggered the planet to shift into and out of ice ages.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/krypton-accurately-dates-antarctic-ice

    Krypton Accurately Dates Antarctic Ice

    A team of scientists has successfully identified the age of 120,000-year-old Antarctic ice using radiometric krypton dating – a new technique that may allow them to locate and date ice that is more than a million years old.

    The ability to discover ancient ice is critical, the researchers say, because it will allow them to reconstruct the climate much farther back into Earth’s history and potentially understand the mechanisms that have triggered the planet to shift into and out of ice ages.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/krypton-accurately-dates-antarctic-ice

  12. 16 Notes
  13. Wild, Domesticated Animals Interbred Until RecentlyMany of our ideas about domestication derive from Charles Darwin, whose ideas in turn were strongly influenced by British animal-breeding practices during the 19th century, a period when landowners vigorously pursued systematic livestock improvement. We inherit the idea that animal domestication involved isolation of captive animals from wild species and total human control over breeding and animal care from Darwin.But animal management in this industrial setting has been applied too broadly in time and space, says Fiona Marshall, professor of anthropology at Washington Univ. in St. Louis. It is not representative of the practices of the Neolithic herders who first domesticated animals nor — for that matter — of contemporary herders in nonindustrial societies.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/wild-domesticated-animals-interbred-until-recently

    Wild, Domesticated Animals Interbred Until Recently

    Many of our ideas about domestication derive from Charles Darwin, whose ideas in turn were strongly influenced by British animal-breeding practices during the 19th century, a period when landowners vigorously pursued systematic livestock improvement. We inherit the idea that animal domestication involved isolation of captive animals from wild species and total human control over breeding and animal care from Darwin.

    But animal management in this industrial setting has been applied too broadly in time and space, says Fiona Marshall, professor of anthropology at Washington Univ. in St. Louis. It is not representative of the practices of the Neolithic herders who first domesticated animals nor — for that matter — of contemporary herders in nonindustrial societies.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/wild-domesticated-animals-interbred-until-recently

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  15. Today in Lab History: Michael FreedmanMichael Freedman is an American mathematician, born on April 21, 1951, who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1986 for his proof of the conjecture in four dimensions in 1982.Read more: http://bit.ly/1kJU2Ou

    Today in Lab History: Michael Freedman

    Michael Freedman is an American mathematician, born on April 21, 1951, who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1986 for his proof of the conjecture in four dimensions in 1982.

    Read more: http://bit.ly/1kJU2Ou

  16. 2 Notes
  17. Impact Glass Stores Bio-data for MillenniaAsteroid and comet impacts can cause widespread ecological havoc, killing off plants and animals on regional or even global scales. But, new research from Brown Univ. shows that impacts can also preserve the signatures of ancient life at the time of an impact.A research team led by Brown geologist Pete Schultz has found fragments of leaves and preserved organic compounds lodged inside glass created by a several ancient impacts in Argentina. The material could provide a snapshot of environmental conditions at the time of those impacts. The find also suggests that impact glasses could be a good place to look for signs of ancient life on Mars.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/impact-glass-stores-bio-data-millennia

    Impact Glass Stores Bio-data for Millennia

    Asteroid and comet impacts can cause widespread ecological havoc, killing off plants and animals on regional or even global scales. But, new research from Brown Univ. shows that impacts can also preserve the signatures of ancient life at the time of an impact.

    A research team led by Brown geologist Pete Schultz has found fragments of leaves and preserved organic compounds lodged inside glass created by a several ancient impacts in Argentina. The material could provide a snapshot of environmental conditions at the time of those impacts. The find also suggests that impact glasses could be a good place to look for signs of ancient life on Mars.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/impact-glass-stores-bio-data-millennia

  18. 22 Notes
  19. Ancient Landscape Exists Beneath Greenland’s IceSome of the landscape underlying the massive Greenland ice sheet may have been undisturbed for 2.7 million years, ever since the island became completely ice-covered, according to researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).Basing their discovery on an analysis of the chemical composition of silts recovered from the bottom of an ice core more than 3,000 meters long, the researchers argue that the find suggests “pre-glacial landscapes can remain preserved for long periods under continental ice sheets.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/ancient-landscape-exists-beneath-greenlands-ice

    Ancient Landscape Exists Beneath Greenland’s Ice

    Some of the landscape underlying the massive Greenland ice sheet may have been undisturbed for 2.7 million years, ever since the island became completely ice-covered, according to researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Basing their discovery on an analysis of the chemical composition of silts recovered from the bottom of an ice core more than 3,000 meters long, the researchers argue that the find suggests “pre-glacial landscapes can remain preserved for long periods under continental ice sheets.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/ancient-landscape-exists-beneath-greenlands-ice

  20. 34 Notes
  21. Rome was Founded 100 Years Earlier than ThoughtIt has been reported that new archeological finds have pushed back the age of Rome. A team of archeologists discovered the remains of a wall built to channel water, which dates back to the ninth century BC.Media attention has focused on the fact that the dating is significantly earlier than the traditional idea that Rome was founded on April 21, 753 BC by the twins Romulus and Remus. With Rome due to celebrate its 2,767th birthday, the timing makes for a particularly good story.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/rome-was-founded-100-years-earlier-thought

    Rome was Founded 100 Years Earlier than Thought

    It has been reported that new archeological finds have pushed back the age of Rome. A team of archeologists discovered the remains of a wall built to channel water, which dates back to the ninth century BC.

    Media attention has focused on the fact that the dating is significantly earlier than the traditional idea that Rome was founded on April 21, 753 BC by the twins Romulus and Remus. With Rome due to celebrate its 2,767th birthday, the timing makes for a particularly good story.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/rome-was-founded-100-years-earlier-thought

  22. 106 Notes
  23. Today in Lab History: April 17, 1930- Synthetic RubberOn April 17, 1930, the discovery of a new rubber-like compound was recorded by Arnold Collins in his laboratory notebook. He had noticed that a mixture that had stood from some weeks before, had solidified, “to white, somewhat rubber-like masses,” from polymerization of monovinylacetylene mixed with concentrated HCl. He theorized the new compound was 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-synthetic-rubber

    Today in Lab History: April 17, 1930- Synthetic Rubber

    On April 17, 1930, the discovery of a new rubber-like compound was recorded by Arnold Collins in his laboratory notebook. He had noticed that a mixture that had stood from some weeks before, had solidified, “to white, somewhat rubber-like masses,” from polymerization of monovinylacetylene mixed with concentrated HCl. He theorized the new compound was 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-synthetic-rubber

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  25. Today in Lab History: April 14, 1932- Scientist Split the AtomOn April 14, 1932, the atom was split by a proton beam on a lithium target. Two physicists, Englishman Sir John Cockcroft and Irishman Ernest Walton had developed the first nuclear particle accelerator. With the accelerator, Walton succeeded in being the first to split the atom.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-percy-julian

    Today in Lab History: April 14, 1932- Scientist Split the Atom

    On April 14, 1932, the atom was split by a proton beam on a lithium target. Two physicists, Englishman Sir John Cockcroft and Irishman Ernest Walton had developed the first nuclear particle accelerator. With the accelerator, Walton succeeded in being the first to split the atom.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-percy-julian

  26. 16 Notes
  27. Archeologists Use Construction Machinery to Move MammothSerbian archaeologists have used heavy machinery to move a female mammoth skeleton — believed to be one million years old — from an open mine pit where it was unearthed nearly five years ago.Workers with cranes and bulldozers worked carefully for hours at the Kostolac coal mine in eastern Serbia to transfer the mammoth, known as Vika, to an exhibition area several kilometers away.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/archeologists-use-construction-machinery-move-mammoth

    Archeologists Use Construction Machinery to Move Mammoth

    Serbian archaeologists have used heavy machinery to move a female mammoth skeleton — believed to be one million years old — from an open mine pit where it was unearthed nearly five years ago.

    Workers with cranes and bulldozers worked carefully for hours at the Kostolac coal mine in eastern Serbia to transfer the mammoth, known as Vika, to an exhibition area several kilometers away.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/archeologists-use-construction-machinery-move-mammoth

  28. 10 Notes
  29. Greenland’s Ice Holds Record of U.S. Clean Air Act’s SuccessThe rise and fall of acid rain is a global experiment whose results are preserved in the geologic record.By analyzing samples from the Greenland ice sheet, Univ. of Washington atmospheric scientists found clear evidence of the U.S. Clean Air Act. They also discovered a link between air acidity and how nitrogen is preserved in layers of snow, according to a paper published in PNAS.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/greenlands-ice-holds-record-us-clean-air-act%E2%80%99s-success

    Greenland’s Ice Holds Record of U.S. Clean Air Act’s Success

    The rise and fall of acid rain is a global experiment whose results are preserved in the geologic record.

    By analyzing samples from the Greenland ice sheet, Univ. of Washington atmospheric scientists found clear evidence of the U.S. Clean Air Act. They also discovered a link between air acidity and how nitrogen is preserved in layers of snow, according to a paper published in PNAS.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/greenlands-ice-holds-record-us-clean-air-act%E2%80%99s-success

  30. 66 Notes