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  1. Rome was Founded 100 Years Earlier than ThoughtIt has been reported that new archeological finds have pushed back the age of Rome. A team of archeologists discovered the remains of a wall built to channel water, which dates back to the ninth century BC.Media attention has focused on the fact that the dating is significantly earlier than the traditional idea that Rome was founded on April 21, 753 BC by the twins Romulus and Remus. With Rome due to celebrate its 2,767th birthday, the timing makes for a particularly good story.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/rome-was-founded-100-years-earlier-thought

    Rome was Founded 100 Years Earlier than Thought

    It has been reported that new archeological finds have pushed back the age of Rome. A team of archeologists discovered the remains of a wall built to channel water, which dates back to the ninth century BC.

    Media attention has focused on the fact that the dating is significantly earlier than the traditional idea that Rome was founded on April 21, 753 BC by the twins Romulus and Remus. With Rome due to celebrate its 2,767th birthday, the timing makes for a particularly good story.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/rome-was-founded-100-years-earlier-thought

  2. 93 Notes
  3. Today in Lab History: April 17, 1930- Synthetic RubberOn April 17, 1930, the discovery of a new rubber-like compound was recorded by Arnold Collins in his laboratory notebook. He had noticed that a mixture that had stood from some weeks before, had solidified, “to white, somewhat rubber-like masses,” from polymerization of monovinylacetylene mixed with concentrated HCl. He theorized the new compound was 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-synthetic-rubber

    Today in Lab History: April 17, 1930- Synthetic Rubber

    On April 17, 1930, the discovery of a new rubber-like compound was recorded by Arnold Collins in his laboratory notebook. He had noticed that a mixture that had stood from some weeks before, had solidified, “to white, somewhat rubber-like masses,” from polymerization of monovinylacetylene mixed with concentrated HCl. He theorized the new compound was 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-synthetic-rubber

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  5. Today in Lab History: April 14, 1932- Scientist Split the AtomOn April 14, 1932, the atom was split by a proton beam on a lithium target. Two physicists, Englishman Sir John Cockcroft and Irishman Ernest Walton had developed the first nuclear particle accelerator. With the accelerator, Walton succeeded in being the first to split the atom.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-percy-julian

    Today in Lab History: April 14, 1932- Scientist Split the Atom

    On April 14, 1932, the atom was split by a proton beam on a lithium target. Two physicists, Englishman Sir John Cockcroft and Irishman Ernest Walton had developed the first nuclear particle accelerator. With the accelerator, Walton succeeded in being the first to split the atom.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-percy-julian

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  7. Archeologists Use Construction Machinery to Move MammothSerbian archaeologists have used heavy machinery to move a female mammoth skeleton — believed to be one million years old — from an open mine pit where it was unearthed nearly five years ago.Workers with cranes and bulldozers worked carefully for hours at the Kostolac coal mine in eastern Serbia to transfer the mammoth, known as Vika, to an exhibition area several kilometers away.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/archeologists-use-construction-machinery-move-mammoth

    Archeologists Use Construction Machinery to Move Mammoth

    Serbian archaeologists have used heavy machinery to move a female mammoth skeleton — believed to be one million years old — from an open mine pit where it was unearthed nearly five years ago.

    Workers with cranes and bulldozers worked carefully for hours at the Kostolac coal mine in eastern Serbia to transfer the mammoth, known as Vika, to an exhibition area several kilometers away.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/archeologists-use-construction-machinery-move-mammoth

  8. 10 Notes
  9. Greenland’s Ice Holds Record of U.S. Clean Air Act’s SuccessThe rise and fall of acid rain is a global experiment whose results are preserved in the geologic record.By analyzing samples from the Greenland ice sheet, Univ. of Washington atmospheric scientists found clear evidence of the U.S. Clean Air Act. They also discovered a link between air acidity and how nitrogen is preserved in layers of snow, according to a paper published in PNAS.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/greenlands-ice-holds-record-us-clean-air-act%E2%80%99s-success

    Greenland’s Ice Holds Record of U.S. Clean Air Act’s Success

    The rise and fall of acid rain is a global experiment whose results are preserved in the geologic record.

    By analyzing samples from the Greenland ice sheet, Univ. of Washington atmospheric scientists found clear evidence of the U.S. Clean Air Act. They also discovered a link between air acidity and how nitrogen is preserved in layers of snow, according to a paper published in PNAS.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/greenlands-ice-holds-record-us-clean-air-act%E2%80%99s-success

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  11. Today in Lab History: April 11, 1899- Percy JulianPercy Julian was an African American chemist, born April 11, 1899, whose 100 patents included the synthesis of cortisone, hormones and other products from soybeans. He isolated from plants simple compounds and investigated how they were naturally altered into chemicals essential to life, including vitamins and hormones; then he attempted to create the compounds artificially.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-percy-julian

    Today in Lab History: April 11, 1899- Percy Julian

    Percy Julian was an African American chemist, born April 11, 1899, whose 100 patents included the synthesis of cortisone, hormones and other products from soybeans. He isolated from plants simple compounds and investigated how they were naturally altered into chemicals essential to life, including vitamins and hormones; then he attempted to create the compounds artificially.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-percy-julian

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  13. Ancestral Grass May Save Modern WheatU.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have pinpointed the location of a gene in a little-known ancient grass that could help save one of the world’s most important cereal crops from an unrelenting fungus.Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Matt Rouse and Yue Jin, with the agency’s Cereal Disease Research Laboratory, found the gene while studying the DNA of ancient grasses. They were searching for genes that could make wheat more resistant to Ug99 (Puccinia graminis), a type of stem rust that is constantly evolving. ARS is USDA’s principal intramural scientific research agency, and this work supports the USDA priority of promoting international food security.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/ancestral-grass-may-save-modern-wheat

    Ancestral Grass May Save Modern Wheat

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have pinpointed the location of a gene in a little-known ancient grass that could help save one of the world’s most important cereal crops from an unrelenting fungus.

    Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Matt Rouse and Yue Jin, with the agency’s Cereal Disease Research Laboratory, found the gene while studying the DNA of ancient grasses. They were searching for genes that could make wheat more resistant to Ug99 (Puccinia graminis), a type of stem rust that is constantly evolving. ARS is USDA’s principal intramural scientific research agency, and this work supports the USDA priority of promoting international food security.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/ancestral-grass-may-save-modern-wheat

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  15. Climate Drove Evolution of Ice Age Predators

    Concerns about climate change and its impact on the world around us are growing daily. New scientific studies from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County working at the La Brea Tar Pits are probing the link between climate warming and the evolution of Ice Age predators, attempting to predict how animals will respond to climate change today. The La Brea Tar Pits are famous for the amazing array of Ice Age fossils found there, such as ground sloths, mammoths and predators like saber-toothed cats and powerful dire wolves. But the climate during the end of the Ice Age (50,000-11,000 years ago) was unstable, with rapid warming and cooling. The research has documented the impact of this climate change on La Brea predators for the first time.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/04/climate-drove-evolution-ice-age-predators

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  17. Farming Technology Yielded Couch Potatoes Research into lower limb bones shows that our early farming ancestors in Central Europe became less active as their tasks diversified and technology improved. Anthropologist Alison Macintosh has shown that this drop in mobility was particularly marked in men.Human bones are remarkably plastic and respond surprisingly quickly to change. Put under stress through physical exertion – such as long-distance walking or running – bones gain in strength as the fibers are added or redistributed according to where strains are highest. The ability of bone to adapt to loading is shown by analysis of the skeletons of modern athletes, whose bones show remarkably rapid adaptation to both the intensity and direction of strains.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/farming-technology-gave-birth-couch-potatoes

    Farming Technology Yielded Couch Potatoes

    Research into lower limb bones shows that our early farming ancestors in Central Europe became less active as their tasks diversified and technology improved. Anthropologist Alison Macintosh has shown that this drop in mobility was particularly marked in men.

    Human bones are remarkably plastic and respond surprisingly quickly to change. Put under stress through physical exertion – such as long-distance walking or running – bones gain in strength as the fibers are added or redistributed according to where strains are highest. The ability of bone to adapt to loading is shown by analysis of the skeletons of modern athletes, whose bones show remarkably rapid adaptation to both the intensity and direction of strains.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/farming-technology-gave-birth-couch-potatoes

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  19. Method Precisely Deduces Age of Stars, Pinpoints EventsReconstructing the history of our Galaxy has just become a whole lot easier, thanks to a team of international astronomers led by Luca Casagrande from the Australian National Univ.’s Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics.By examining both the light and sound waves from stars, the team has developed a more precise way to deduce the ages of stars and to pinpoint when our Galaxy’s big events happened.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/method-precisely-deduces-age-stars-pinpoints-events

    Method Precisely Deduces Age of Stars, Pinpoints Events

    Reconstructing the history of our Galaxy has just become a whole lot easier, thanks to a team of international astronomers led by Luca Casagrande from the Australian National Univ.’s Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

    By examining both the light and sound waves from stars, the team has developed a more precise way to deduce the ages of stars and to pinpoint when our Galaxy’s big events happened.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/method-precisely-deduces-age-stars-pinpoints-events

  20. 29 Notes
  21. Calm Down: Ancient Environmental Viruses Aren’t a ThreatYou may have seen recently that scientists recovered and “revived” a giant virus from Siberian permafrost (frozen soil) that dates back 30,000 years.The researchers raised concerns that drilling in the permafrost may expose us to many more pathogenic viruses. Should we be worried about being infected from the past? Can human viruses survive in this permafrost environment and come back to wreak havoc?Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/calm-down-ancient-environmental-viruses-arent-threat

    Calm Down: Ancient Environmental Viruses Aren’t a Threat

    You may have seen recently that scientists recovered and “revived” a giant virus from Siberian permafrost (frozen soil) that dates back 30,000 years.

    The researchers raised concerns that drilling in the permafrost may expose us to many more pathogenic viruses. Should we be worried about being infected from the past? Can human viruses survive in this permafrost environment and come back to wreak havoc?

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/calm-down-ancient-environmental-viruses-arent-threat

  22. 143 Notes
  23. Today in Lab History: April 7, 1809- James GlaisherJames Glaisher, born on April 7, 1809, was an English meteorologist and aeronaut who, between 1862-66 with Henry Coxwell, made balloon ascents, many of which were arranged by a committee of the British Association.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-velcro

    Today in Lab History: April 7, 1809- James Glaisher

    James Glaisher, born on April 7, 1809, was an English meteorologist and aeronaut who, between 1862-66 with Henry Coxwell, made balloon ascents, many of which were arranged by a committee of the British Association.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/today-lab-history-velcro

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  25. Space Auction Has ‘Dusty’ ItemEverything from American and Russian spacesuits to a moon dust-covered strap from the Apollo 12 mission will be available to space history buffs at auction in New York City this week.Among the highlights at Bonhams on Tuesday is a motion picture sight ring, a small polarizing filter put on a camera that was used by astronaut James Irwin on Apollo 15.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/space-auction-has-dusty-item

    Space Auction Has ‘Dusty’ Item

    Everything from American and Russian spacesuits to a moon dust-covered strap from the Apollo 12 mission will be available to space history buffs at auction in New York City this week.

    Among the highlights at Bonhams on Tuesday is a motion picture sight ring, a small polarizing filter put on a camera that was used by astronaut James Irwin on Apollo 15.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/space-auction-has-dusty-item

  26. 25 Notes
  27. Ancestral Genes Shed Light on EuropeansModern humans of European descent have a lot in common with their Neanderthal ancestors when it comes to genes related to fat breakdown in the brain. A team led by investigators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai has found that people of European descent have three times the number of Neanderthal-like sequences in such genes compared to other modern human populations examined. The results, published this week in Nature Communications, point to how studying ancestral sequences could help researchers better understand modern humans."This paper presents a sort of second-phase research using what we know about where genes have come from,” says John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist at the Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, who was not involved in the study. “For some that come from Neanderthals, we can use that information to learn something new about human genetics and human biology.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/ancestral-genes-shed-light-europeans

    Ancestral Genes Shed Light on Europeans

    Modern humans of European descent have a lot in common with their Neanderthal ancestors when it comes to genes related to fat breakdown in the brain. A team led by investigators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai has found that people of European descent have three times the number of Neanderthal-like sequences in such genes compared to other modern human populations examined. The results, published this week in Nature Communications, point to how studying ancestral sequences could help researchers better understand modern humans.

    "This paper presents a sort of second-phase research using what we know about where genes have come from,” says John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist at the Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, who was not involved in the study. “For some that come from Neanderthals, we can use that information to learn something new about human genetics and human biology.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/ancestral-genes-shed-light-europeans

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  29. Today in Lab History: April 2, 1978- VelcroOn April 2, 1978, Velcro, the hook-and-loop fastener, was released. It was developed by Swiss engineer Georges de Mestral, who noticed how thistle burrs clung to his clothing during a hike in the mountains.Read more: http://dld.bz/dmE8E

    Today in Lab History: April 2, 1978- Velcro

    On April 2, 1978, Velcro, the hook-and-loop fastener, was released. It was developed by Swiss engineer Georges de Mestral, who noticed how thistle burrs clung to his clothing during a hike in the mountains.

    Read more: http://dld.bz/dmE8E

  30. 23 Notes