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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Get Your Robots Hot from the Oven

    Printable robots — those that can be assembled from parts produced by 3-D printers — have long been a topic of research in the lab of Daniela Rus, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT.

    At this year’s IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Rus’ group and its collaborators introduce a new wrinkle on the idea: bakable robots. In two new papers, the researchers demonstrate the promise of printable robotic components that, when heated, automatically fold into prescribed three-dimensional configurations.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/05/get-your-robots-hot-oven

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  3. Method Harnesses Waste HeatVast amounts of excess heat are generated by industrial processes and by electric power plants; researchers around the world have spent decades seeking ways to harness some of this wasted energy. Most such efforts have focused on thermoelectric devices, solid-state materials that can produce electricity from a temperature gradient, but the efficiency of such devices is limited by the availability of materials.Now, researchers at MIT and Stanford Univ. have found a new alternative for low-temperature waste-heat conversion into electricity — that is, in cases where temperature differences are less than 100 C.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/method-harnesses-waste-heat

    Method Harnesses Waste Heat

    Vast amounts of excess heat are generated by industrial processes and by electric power plants; researchers around the world have spent decades seeking ways to harness some of this wasted energy. Most such efforts have focused on thermoelectric devices, solid-state materials that can produce electricity from a temperature gradient, but the efficiency of such devices is limited by the availability of materials.

    Now, researchers at MIT and Stanford Univ. have found a new alternative for low-temperature waste-heat conversion into electricity — that is, in cases where temperature differences are less than 100 C.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/method-harnesses-waste-heat

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  5. Studies Say Climate Change Worsens WildfiresThe devastating wildfires scorching Southern California offer a glimpse of a warmer and fierier future, according to scientists and federal and international reports.In the past three months, at least three different studies and reports have warned that wildfires are getting bigger, that man-made climate change is to blame, and it’s only going to get worse with more fires starting earlier in the year. While scientists are reluctant to blame global warming for any specific fire, they have been warning for years about how it will lead to more fires and earlier fire seasons.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/studies-say-climate-change-worsens-wildfires

    Studies Say Climate Change Worsens Wildfires

    The devastating wildfires scorching Southern California offer a glimpse of a warmer and fierier future, according to scientists and federal and international reports.

    In the past three months, at least three different studies and reports have warned that wildfires are getting bigger, that man-made climate change is to blame, and it’s only going to get worse with more fires starting earlier in the year. While scientists are reluctant to blame global warming for any specific fire, they have been warning for years about how it will lead to more fires and earlier fire seasons.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/studies-say-climate-change-worsens-wildfires

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  7. Lightweight Materials Can Be Produced in Harsh EnvironmentsThe earth’s crust works like a pressure cooker. Minerals typically do not form under standard conditions, but at high temperatures and pressures. However, an environment of extreme heat and pressure has been considered to be absolutely unsuitable for organic molecules. Scientists at Vienna Univ. of Technology found out that under such seemingly hostile conditions, organic materials with remarkable material properties can be synthesized – for instance Kevlar, an extremely versatile high-performance material.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/lightweight-materials-can-be-produced-harsh-environments

    Lightweight Materials Can Be Produced in Harsh Environments

    The earth’s crust works like a pressure cooker. Minerals typically do not form under standard conditions, but at high temperatures and pressures. However, an environment of extreme heat and pressure has been considered to be absolutely unsuitable for organic molecules. Scientists at Vienna Univ. of Technology found out that under such seemingly hostile conditions, organic materials with remarkable material properties can be synthesized – for instance Kevlar, an extremely versatile high-performance material.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/lightweight-materials-can-be-produced-harsh-environments

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  9. Analysis Solves a Mystery of ThermoelectricsMaterials that can be used for thermoelectric devices — those that turn a temperature difference into an electric voltage — have been known for decades. But until now there has been no good explanation for why just a few materials work well for these applications, while most others do not. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere say they have finally found a theoretical explanation for the differences, which could lead to the discovery of new, improved thermoelectric materials.The findings — by MIT graduate student Sangyeop Lee and Gang Chen, the Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering; and four others — are reported this week in the journal Nature Communications.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/analysis-solves-mystery-thermoelectrics

    Analysis Solves a Mystery of Thermoelectrics

    Materials that can be used for thermoelectric devices — those that turn a temperature difference into an electric voltage — have been known for decades. But until now there has been no good explanation for why just a few materials work well for these applications, while most others do not. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere say they have finally found a theoretical explanation for the differences, which could lead to the discovery of new, improved thermoelectric materials.

    The findings — by MIT graduate student Sangyeop Lee and Gang Chen, the Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering; and four others — are reported this week in the journal Nature Communications.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/analysis-solves-mystery-thermoelectrics

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  11. Material Stores Sun’s Heat for Power When It’s CloudyIt’s an obvious truism, but one that may soon be outdated: the problem with solar power is that sometimes the sun doesn’t shine.Now a team at MIT and Harvard Univ. has come up with an ingenious workaround — a material that can absorb the sun’s heat and store that energy in chemical form, ready to be released again on demand.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/material-stores-suns-heat-power-when-its-cloudy

    Material Stores Sun’s Heat for Power When It’s Cloudy

    It’s an obvious truism, but one that may soon be outdated: the problem with solar power is that sometimes the sun doesn’t shine.

    Now a team at MIT and Harvard Univ. has come up with an ingenious workaround — a material that can absorb the sun’s heat and store that energy in chemical form, ready to be released again on demand.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/material-stores-suns-heat-power-when-its-cloudy

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  13. Pasteurizing Raw Eggs Kills Salmonella, Doesn’t Harm EggsClassic Caesar salad, old-fashioned eggnog, some homemade ice cream — and many other popular foods — may contain raw eggs. Now, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-led research has produced a faster way to pasteurize raw, in-shell eggs without ruining their taste, texture, color or other important qualities.The pasteurization procedure targets Salmonella. That’s because an estimated one out of every 20,000 chicken eggs produced in the U.S. has a high risk of being contaminated with Salmonella, notably S. enteritidis. That pathogen has been associated with eating raw or undercooked eggs, and can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, fever and — in some instances — death.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/pasteurizing-raw-eggs-kills-salmonella-doesnt-harm-eggs

    Pasteurizing Raw Eggs Kills Salmonella, Doesn’t Harm Eggs

    Classic Caesar salad, old-fashioned eggnog, some homemade ice cream — and many other popular foods — may contain raw eggs. Now, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-led research has produced a faster way to pasteurize raw, in-shell eggs without ruining their taste, texture, color or other important qualities.

    The pasteurization procedure targets Salmonella. That’s because an estimated one out of every 20,000 chicken eggs produced in the U.S. has a high risk of being contaminated with Salmonella, notably S. enteritidis. That pathogen has been associated with eating raw or undercooked eggs, and can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, fever and — in some instances — death.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/pasteurizing-raw-eggs-kills-salmonella-doesnt-harm-eggs

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  15. Titanium Clubs Can Set the Green Ablaze

    Titanium alloy golf clubs can cause dangerous wildfires, UC Irvine scientists say. When a club coated with the lightweight metal is swung and strikes a rock, it creates sparks that can heat to more than 3,000 F for long enough to ignite dry foliage, according to findings published recently in the peer-reviewed journal Fire and Materials.

    Orange County, Calif., fire investigators asked UC Irvine to determine whether such clubs could have caused blazes at Shady Canyon Golf Course in Irvine and Arroyo Trabuco Golf Club in Mission Viejo a few years ago.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/03/titanium-clubs-can-set-green-ablaze

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  17. El Nino is Good News for U.S. Weather Woes

    Federal forecasters predict a warming of the central Pacific Ocean this year that will change weather worldwide. And that’s good news for a weather-weary U.S.

    The warming, called an El Nino, is expected to lead to fewer Atlantic hurricanes and more rain next winter for drought-stricken California and southern states, and even a milder winter for the nation’s frigid northern tier next year, meteorologists say.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/el-nino-good-news-us-weather-woes

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  19. Nanoscale Pillars May Aid Conversion of Heat to ElectricityUniv. of Colorado Boulder scientists have found a creative way to radically improve thermoelectric materials, a finding that could one day lead to the development of improved solar panels, more energy-efficient cooling equipment and even the creation of new devices that could turn the vast amounts of heat wasted at power plants into more electricity.The technique — building an array of tiny pillars on top of a sheet of thermoelectric material — represents an entirely new way of attacking a century-old problem, says Mahmoud Hussein, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering sciences who pioneered the discovery.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/nanoscale-pillars-may-aid-conversion-heat-electricity

    Nanoscale Pillars May Aid Conversion of Heat to Electricity

    Univ. of Colorado Boulder scientists have found a creative way to radically improve thermoelectric materials, a finding that could one day lead to the development of improved solar panels, more energy-efficient cooling equipment and even the creation of new devices that could turn the vast amounts of heat wasted at power plants into more electricity.

    The technique — building an array of tiny pillars on top of a sheet of thermoelectric material — represents an entirely new way of attacking a century-old problem, says Mahmoud Hussein, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering sciences who pioneered the discovery.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/nanoscale-pillars-may-aid-conversion-heat-electricity

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  21. Astrophysicists Solve 30-Year-Old ProblemAn international group of astrophysicists has found evidence strongly supporting a solution to a long-standing puzzle about the birth of some of the most massive stars in the universe. Young massive stars, which have more than 10 times the mass of the Sun, shine brightly in the ultraviolet, heating the gas around them, and it has long been a mystery why the hot gas doesn’t explode outwards. Now, observations made by a team of researchers using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), a radio astronomy observatory in New Mexico, have confirmed predications that as the gas cloud collapses, it forms dense filamentary structures that absorb the star’s ultraviolet radiation when it passes through them. As a result, the surrounding heated nebula flickers like a candle.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/astrophysicists-solve-30-year-old-problem

    Astrophysicists Solve 30-Year-Old Problem

    An international group of astrophysicists has found evidence strongly supporting a solution to a long-standing puzzle about the birth of some of the most massive stars in the universe. Young massive stars, which have more than 10 times the mass of the Sun, shine brightly in the ultraviolet, heating the gas around them, and it has long been a mystery why the hot gas doesn’t explode outwards. Now, observations made by a team of researchers using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), a radio astronomy observatory in New Mexico, have confirmed predications that as the gas cloud collapses, it forms dense filamentary structures that absorb the star’s ultraviolet radiation when it passes through them. As a result, the surrounding heated nebula flickers like a candle.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/astrophysicists-solve-30-year-old-problem

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  23. Technology May Control Heat FlowResearchers are proposing a new technology that might control the flow of heat the way electronic devices control electrical current, an advance that could have applications in a diverse range of fields from electronics to textiles.The concept uses tiny triangular structures to control “phonons,” quantum-mechanical phenomena that describe how vibrations travel through a material’s crystal structure.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/technology-may-control-heat-flow

    Technology May Control Heat Flow

    Researchers are proposing a new technology that might control the flow of heat the way electronic devices control electrical current, an advance that could have applications in a diverse range of fields from electronics to textiles.

    The concept uses tiny triangular structures to control “phonons,” quantum-mechanical phenomena that describe how vibrations travel through a material’s crystal structure.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/technology-may-control-heat-flow

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  25. Device Taps Sun’s Heat for Energy

    A new approach to harvesting solar energy, developed by MIT researchers, could improve efficiency by using sunlight to heat a high-temperature material whose infrared radiation would then be collected by a conventional photovoltaic cell. This technique could also make it easier to store the energy for later use, the researchers say.

    In this case, adding the extra step improves performance, because it makes it possible to take advantage of wavelengths of light that ordinarily go to waste. The process is described in a paper published this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, written by graduate student Andrej Lenert, associate professor of mechanical engineering Evelyn Wang, physics professor Marin Soljačić, principal research scientist Ivan Celanović and three others.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/01/device-taps-sun%E2%80%99s-heat-energy

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  27. Physicists Measure Temperature Changes in Nanowires

    Using the interaction between light and charge fluctuations in metal nanostuctures called plasmons, a Univ. of Arkansas physicist and his collaborators have demonstrated the ability to measure temperature changes in very small 3D regions of space.

    Plasmons can be thought of as waves of electrons in a metal surface, says Joseph Herzog, visiting assistant professor of physics, who co-authored a paper detailing the findings that was published in Nano Letters.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/physicists-measure-temperature-changes-nanowires

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  29. Warming Causes Changes in Soil Microbes’ DNAAs scientists forecast the impacts of climate change, one missing piece of the puzzle is what will happen to the carbon in the soil and the microbes that control the fate of this carbon as the planet warms.Scientists studying grasslands in Oklahoma have discovered that an increase of 2 C in the air temperature above the soil creates significant changes to the microbial ecosystem underground. Compared to a control group with no warming, plants in the warmer plots grew faster and higher, which put more carbon into the soil as the plants senesce. The microbial ecosystem responded by altering its DNA to enhance the ability to handle the excess carbon.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/warming-causes-changes-soil-microbes-dna

    Warming Causes Changes in Soil Microbes’ DNA

    As scientists forecast the impacts of climate change, one missing piece of the puzzle is what will happen to the carbon in the soil and the microbes that control the fate of this carbon as the planet warms.

    Scientists studying grasslands in Oklahoma have discovered that an increase of 2 C in the air temperature above the soil creates significant changes to the microbial ecosystem underground. Compared to a control group with no warming, plants in the warmer plots grew faster and higher, which put more carbon into the soil as the plants senesce. The microbial ecosystem responded by altering its DNA to enhance the ability to handle the excess carbon.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/warming-causes-changes-soil-microbes-dna

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