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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. ‘Natural’ Moisturizers Can Cause Food AllergiesA woman has experienced a life-threating allergic reaction after using a moisturiser with “natural” ingredients. The 55-year-old woman experienced the reaction after eating goat’s cheese, which researchers say was triggered by the repeated use several months earlier of a moisturizer that contained goat’s milk.Prof. Robyn O’Hehir, Director of Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, at Monash Univ. says many creams – even for the treatment of dry skin and eczema – are advertised as “natural” products.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98natural%E2%80%99-moisturizers-can-cause-food-allergies

    ‘Natural’ Moisturizers Can Cause Food Allergies

    A woman has experienced a life-threating allergic reaction after using a moisturiser with “natural” ingredients. The 55-year-old woman experienced the reaction after eating goat’s cheese, which researchers say was triggered by the repeated use several months earlier of a moisturizer that contained goat’s milk.

    Prof. Robyn O’Hehir, Director of Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, at Monash Univ. says many creams – even for the treatment of dry skin and eczema – are advertised as “natural” products.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98natural%E2%80%99-moisturizers-can-cause-food-allergies

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  3. Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be OverweightA study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

    Diet Makes Kids 15 Percent Less Likely to be Overweight

    A study of eight European countries presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO)in Sofia, Bulgaria, has shown that children consuming a diet more in line with the rules of the Mediterranean one are 15 percent less likely to be overweight or obese than those children who do not.

    The research is by Gianluca Tognon, Univ. of Gothenburg, and colleagues across the 8 countries: Sweden, Germany, Spain, Italy, Cyprus, Belgium, Estonia and Hungary.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diet-makes-kids-15-percent-less-likely-be-overweight

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  5. New Zealand Announces High-security Biocontainment LabPrimary Industries Minister Nathan Guy says a new $65 m high-security biocontainment laboratory announced in Wallaceville is another demonstration of the Government’s commitment to biosecurity.“The new facility will replace the existing high security laboratory and continue more than 100 years of animal disease diagnostics at the site,” says Guy. “The existing laboratories and skilled personnel have an essential role in responding to disease outbreaks, protecting public health and providing international trade assurances about New Zealand’s animal disease status. While these current labs have a good service record, they are now reaching the end of their design life. This new, fit-for-purpose laboratory facility will be equipped to current international standards, and have better capacity to deal with a large-scale emergency situation, in the unlikely event one should occur.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-zealand-announces-high-security-biocontainment-lab

    New Zealand Announces High-security Biocontainment Lab

    Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy says a new $65 m high-security biocontainment laboratory announced in Wallaceville is another demonstration of the Government’s commitment to biosecurity.

    “The new facility will replace the existing high security laboratory and continue more than 100 years of animal disease diagnostics at the site,” says Guy. “The existing laboratories and skilled personnel have an essential role in responding to disease outbreaks, protecting public health and providing international trade assurances about New Zealand’s animal disease status. While these current labs have a good service record, they are now reaching the end of their design life. This new, fit-for-purpose laboratory facility will be equipped to current international standards, and have better capacity to deal with a large-scale emergency situation, in the unlikely event one should occur.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-zealand-announces-high-security-biocontainment-lab

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  7. New Lab to Speed Michigan Water TestingA new laboratory at Lake St. Clair Metropark in Harrison Township aims to speed and improve the process of testing water at beaches in Michigan.The Macomb Daily of Mount Clemens and The Detroit News report the lab opened this week in Harrison Township following years of work to improve testing. The lab is part of a pilot project designed to help state officials plan for future water monitoring.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-lab-speed-michigan-water-testing

    New Lab to Speed Michigan Water Testing

    A new laboratory at Lake St. Clair Metropark in Harrison Township aims to speed and improve the process of testing water at beaches in Michigan.

    The Macomb Daily of Mount Clemens and The Detroit News report the lab opened this week in Harrison Township following years of work to improve testing. The lab is part of a pilot project designed to help state officials plan for future water monitoring.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-lab-speed-michigan-water-testing

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  9. Diabetes-linked Gene Regulates Cell’s PowerhouseA team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the Univ. of Pennsylvania found that a susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes regulates self-destruction of the cell’s energy factory. They report their findings this week in Cell.The pathway central to this gene could be targeted for prevention and control of type-1 diabetes and may extend to the treatment of other metabolic-associated diseases.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diabetes-linked-gene-regulates-cells-powerhouse

    Diabetes-linked Gene Regulates Cell’s Powerhouse

    A team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the Univ. of Pennsylvania found that a susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes regulates self-destruction of the cell’s energy factory. They report their findings this week in Cell.

    The pathway central to this gene could be targeted for prevention and control of type-1 diabetes and may extend to the treatment of other metabolic-associated diseases.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/diabetes-linked-gene-regulates-cells-powerhouse

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  11. New Lab Designed for High-altitude Medical ResearchAn international laboratory for high-altitude medical research has been established in Xining City, capital of northwest China’s Qinghai Province.The lab is a joint project by Qinghai Univ. and the Univ. of Utah. Scientists from the two universities have been partners in academic exchange, personnel training and research collaboration since a cooperative agreement in April 2010.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-lab-designed-high-altitude-medical-research

    New Lab Designed for High-altitude Medical Research

    An international laboratory for high-altitude medical research has been established in Xining City, capital of northwest China’s Qinghai Province.

    The lab is a joint project by Qinghai Univ. and the Univ. of Utah. Scientists from the two universities have been partners in academic exchange, personnel training and research collaboration since a cooperative agreement in April 2010.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/new-lab-designed-high-altitude-medical-research

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  13. Evidence Shows Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents CancerResearch conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.According to senior author John VandeBerg, the research was driven by the fact that, despite the increasing use of sunscreen in recent decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, continues to increase dramatically. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 75,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/evidence-shows-sunscreen-use-childhood-prevents-cancer

    Evidence Shows Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents Cancer

    Research conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.

    According to senior author John VandeBerg, the research was driven by the fact that, despite the increasing use of sunscreen in recent decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, continues to increase dramatically. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 75,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/evidence-shows-sunscreen-use-childhood-prevents-cancer

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  15. Breathalyzer May Detect Deadliest CancerLung cancer causes more deaths in the U.S. than the next three most common cancers combined — colon, breast and pancreatic. The reason for the striking mortality rate is simple: poor detection. Lung cancer attacks without leaving any fingerprints, quietly afflicting its victims and metastasizing uncontrollably — to the point of no return.Now a new device developed by a team of Israeli, American and British cancer researchers may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression. The breathalyzer test, embedded with a “NaNose” nanotech chip to literally “sniff out” cancer tumors, was developed by Prof. Nir Peled of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Prof. Hossam Haick of the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology and Prof. Fred Hirsch of the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/breathalyzer-may-detect-deadliest-cancer

    Breathalyzer May Detect Deadliest Cancer

    Lung cancer causes more deaths in the U.S. than the next three most common cancers combined — colon, breast and pancreatic. The reason for the striking mortality rate is simple: poor detection. Lung cancer attacks without leaving any fingerprints, quietly afflicting its victims and metastasizing uncontrollably — to the point of no return.

    Now a new device developed by a team of Israeli, American and British cancer researchers may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression. The breathalyzer test, embedded with a “NaNose” nanotech chip to literally “sniff out” cancer tumors, was developed by Prof. Nir Peled of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Prof. Hossam Haick of the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology and Prof. Fred Hirsch of the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/breathalyzer-may-detect-deadliest-cancer

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  17. ‘Genomic Dark Matter’ Controls Airway Development It’s a long way from DNA to RNA to protein, and only about two percent of a person’s genome is eventually converted into proteins. In contrast, a much higher percentage of the genome is transcribed into RNA. What these non-protein-coding RNAs do is still relatively unknown. However, given their vast numbers in the human genome, researchers believe that they likely play important roles in normal human development and response to disease.Large-scale sequencing has allowed investigators to identify thousands of non-coding RNAs. Small non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, are known to be important players in regulating gene expression in many contexts, including tissue development. On the other hand, the function of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is less well understood.Research led by Ed Morrisey, professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine, Univ. of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has identified hundreds of these lncRNAs, sometimes called the “genomic dark matter,” that are expressed in developing and adult lungs. Their findings, described in and featured on the cover of the current issue of Genes and Development, reveal that many of these lncRNAs in the lung regulate gene expression by opening and closing the DNA scaffolding on neighboring genes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98genomic-dark-matter%E2%80%99-controls-airway-development

    ‘Genomic Dark Matter’ Controls Airway Development

    It’s a long way from DNA to RNA to protein, and only about two percent of a person’s genome is eventually converted into proteins. In contrast, a much higher percentage of the genome is transcribed into RNA. What these non-protein-coding RNAs do is still relatively unknown. However, given their vast numbers in the human genome, researchers believe that they likely play important roles in normal human development and response to disease.

    Large-scale sequencing has allowed investigators to identify thousands of non-coding RNAs. Small non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, are known to be important players in regulating gene expression in many contexts, including tissue development. On the other hand, the function of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is less well understood.

    Research led by Ed Morrisey, professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine, Univ. of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has identified hundreds of these lncRNAs, sometimes called the “genomic dark matter,” that are expressed in developing and adult lungs. Their findings, described in and featured on the cover of the current issue of Genes and Development, reveal that many of these lncRNAs in the lung regulate gene expression by opening and closing the DNA scaffolding on neighboring genes.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/%E2%80%98genomic-dark-matter%E2%80%99-controls-airway-development

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  19. Supplements May Be Too Much for Some Older Women

    Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may actually send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 163 older (ages 57 to 90) white women whose vitamin D levels were too low. The women took calcium citrate tablets to meet their recommended intake of 1,200 mg/day, and they took various doses of vitamin D, ranging from 400 to 4,800 IU/day. The trial was limited by ethnicity because different ethnic groups metabolize calcium and vitamin D differently.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/supplements-may-be-too-much-some-older-women

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  21. Sweaty Hands Reduce Metal’s Bacteria-fight AbilitySweaty hands can reduce the effectiveness of bacteria-fighting brass objects in hospitals and schools after just an hour of coming into contact with them, according to scientists at the Univ. of Leicester.Copper found in everyday brass items such as door handles and water taps has an antimicrobial effect on bacteria and is widely used to prevent the spread of disease, John Bond from the Univ. of Leicester’s Department of Chemistry has discovered that peoples’ sweat can, within an hour of contact with the brass, produce sufficient corrosion to adversely affect its use to kill a range of microorganisms, such as those that might be encountered in a hospital and that can be easily transferred by touch or by a lack of hand hygiene.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/sweaty-hands-reduce-metal%E2%80%99s-bacteria-fight-ability

    Sweaty Hands Reduce Metal’s Bacteria-fight Ability

    Sweaty hands can reduce the effectiveness of bacteria-fighting brass objects in hospitals and schools after just an hour of coming into contact with them, according to scientists at the Univ. of Leicester.

    Copper found in everyday brass items such as door handles and water taps has an antimicrobial effect on bacteria and is widely used to prevent the spread of disease, John Bond from the Univ. of Leicester’s Department of Chemistry has discovered that peoples’ sweat can, within an hour of contact with the brass, produce sufficient corrosion to adversely affect its use to kill a range of microorganisms, such as those that might be encountered in a hospital and that can be easily transferred by touch or by a lack of hand hygiene.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/sweaty-hands-reduce-metal%E2%80%99s-bacteria-fight-ability

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  23. Dietary Nanoparticles are Likely to Reach EnvironmentNanoparticles are becoming ubiquitous in food packaging, personal care products and are even being added to food directly. But the health and environmental effects of these tiny additives have remained largely unknown. A new study now suggests that nanomaterials in food and drinks could interfere with digestive cells and lead to the release of the potentially harmful substances to the environment. The report on dietary supplement drinks containing nanoparticles was published in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.Robert Reed and colleagues at Arizona State Univ. note that food and drink manufacturers use nanoparticles in and on their products for many reasons. In packaging, they can provide strength, control how much air gets in and out, and keep unwanted microbes at bay. As additives to food and drinks, they can prevent caking, deliver nutrients and prevent bacterial growth. But as nanoparticles increase in use, so do concerns over their health and environmental effects.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/dietary-nanoparticles-are-likely-reach-environment

    Dietary Nanoparticles are Likely to Reach Environment

    Nanoparticles are becoming ubiquitous in food packaging, personal care products and are even being added to food directly. But the health and environmental effects of these tiny additives have remained largely unknown. A new study now suggests that nanomaterials in food and drinks could interfere with digestive cells and lead to the release of the potentially harmful substances to the environment. The report on dietary supplement drinks containing nanoparticles was published in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

    Robert Reed and colleagues at Arizona State Univ. note that food and drink manufacturers use nanoparticles in and on their products for many reasons. In packaging, they can provide strength, control how much air gets in and out, and keep unwanted microbes at bay. As additives to food and drinks, they can prevent caking, deliver nutrients and prevent bacterial growth. But as nanoparticles increase in use, so do concerns over their health and environmental effects.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/dietary-nanoparticles-are-likely-reach-environment

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  25. Researchers Find Weakness in Antibiotic-resistant BacteriaNew research from the Univ. Of East Anglia, published in the journal Nature, reveals an Achilles’ heel in the defensive barrier that surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells.The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-find-weakness-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

    Researchers Find Weakness in Antibiotic-resistant Bacteria

    New research from the Univ. Of East Anglia, published in the journal Nature, reveals an Achilles’ heel in the defensive barrier that surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells.

    The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-find-weakness-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

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  27. No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer RiskResearchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

    No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer Risk

    Researchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

    Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

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  29. Lifestyle Diseases Rising GloballyWe can all, in general, expect to live a little longer than our grandparents did – and, until recently, many of us have had expectations to live to an older age than our own parents. In addition to living longer, our risks of disease and causes of death are changing.Data from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease survey shows that all around the world populations are shifting away from infectious diseases towards non-communicable diseases (NCDs). NCDs represent a wide range of conditions, among which the most common are heart disease, strokes and lung diseases.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/lifestyle-diseases-rising-globally

    Lifestyle Diseases Rising Globally

    We can all, in general, expect to live a little longer than our grandparents did – and, until recently, many of us have had expectations to live to an older age than our own parents. In addition to living longer, our risks of disease and causes of death are changing.

    Data from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease survey shows that all around the world populations are shifting away from infectious diseases towards non-communicable diseases (NCDs). NCDs represent a wide range of conditions, among which the most common are heart disease, strokes and lung diseases.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/lifestyle-diseases-rising-globally

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