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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Spring Rains Help Granaries but Cause Gulf ‘Dead Zone’The most serious ongoing water pollution problem in the Gulf of Mexico originates not from oil rigs, as many people believe, but rainstorms and fields of corn and soybeans a thousand miles away in the Midwest. An expert on that problem — the infamous Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone” — today called for greater awareness of the connections between rainfall and agriculture in the Midwest and the increasingly severe water quality problems in the gulf.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/04/spring-rains-help-granaries-cause-gulf-%E2%80%98dead-zone%E2%80%99

    Spring Rains Help Granaries but Cause Gulf ‘Dead Zone’

    The most serious ongoing water pollution problem in the Gulf of Mexico originates not from oil rigs, as many people believe, but rainstorms and fields of corn and soybeans a thousand miles away in the Midwest. An expert on that problem — the infamous Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone” — today called for greater awareness of the connections between rainfall and agriculture in the Midwest and the increasingly severe water quality problems in the gulf.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/04/spring-rains-help-granaries-cause-gulf-%E2%80%98dead-zone%E2%80%99

  2. 17 Notes
  3. Trial to Begin for Gulf Oil Spill LitigationNearly three years after a deadly rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico triggered the nation’s worst offshore oil spill, a federal judge in New Orleans is set to preside over a high-stakes trial for the raft of litigation spawned by the disaster.Barring an 11th-hour settlement, U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier will hear several hours of opening statements today by lawyers for the companies involved in the 2010 spill and the plaintiffs who sued them. And the judge, not a jury, ultimately could decide how much more money BP PLC and its partners on the ill-fated drilling project owe for their roles in the environmental catastrophe.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/trial-begin-gulf-oil-spill-litigation

    Trial to Begin for Gulf Oil Spill Litigation

    Nearly three years after a deadly rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico triggered the nation’s worst offshore oil spill, a federal judge in New Orleans is set to preside over a high-stakes trial for the raft of litigation spawned by the disaster.

    Barring an 11th-hour settlement, U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier will hear several hours of opening statements today by lawyers for the companies involved in the 2010 spill and the plaintiffs who sued them. And the judge, not a jury, ultimately could decide how much more money BP PLC and its partners on the ill-fated drilling project owe for their roles in the environmental catastrophe.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/trial-begin-gulf-oil-spill-litigation

  4. 21 Notes
  5. BP Pleads Guilty to Manslaughter, Pays $4 B in Penalties

    A federal judge approved an agreement for BP to plead guilty to manslaughter and other charges and pay a record $4 billion in criminal penalties for the company’s role in the 2010 rig explosion and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

    U.S. District Judge Sarah Vance says the plea deal was “just punishment” considering the alternatives to the settlement, including the risk that a trial could result in a lower fine for BP. Before she ruled, Vance heard emotional testimony from relatives of 11 workers who died when BP’s blown-out Macondo well triggered an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and started the spill. “I’ve heard and I truly understand your feelings and the losses you suffered,” she said.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/bp-pleads-guilty-manslaughter-pays-4-b-penalties

  6. 9 Notes
  7. U.N. Talks Boost Climate Awareness in Gulf RegionHolding a high-profile U.N. climate change conference in Qatar, smack in the middle of the region that produces so much of the fossil fuel blamed for global warming, was a gamble. In the end, it displayed the hosts’ drive for a leading place on the world stage and evoked a surprising new regional awareness of the environmental crisis.In an unexpected bonus, the very presence of the U.N. climate talks in energy-rich Qatar introduced the big-spending Gulf public to the issue of climate change close up for the first time. Dozens of young Arab activists from across the region — most of whom never attended climate talks before — headed home inspired to pressure their governments to do more for the environment.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/un-talks-boost-climate-awareness-gulf-region

    U.N. Talks Boost Climate Awareness in Gulf Region

    Holding a high-profile U.N. climate change conference in Qatar, smack in the middle of the region that produces so much of the fossil fuel blamed for global warming, was a gamble. In the end, it displayed the hosts’ drive for a leading place on the world stage and evoked a surprising new regional awareness of the environmental crisis.

    In an unexpected bonus, the very presence of the U.N. climate talks in energy-rich Qatar introduced the big-spending Gulf public to the issue of climate change close up for the first time. Dozens of young Arab activists from across the region — most of whom never attended climate talks before — headed home inspired to pressure their governments to do more for the environment.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/un-talks-boost-climate-awareness-gulf-region

  8. 15 Notes
  9. Cleanup Efforts Made Gulf 52 Times More ToxicIf the 4.9 million barrels of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 Deep Water Horizon spill was a ecological disaster, the two million gallons of dispersant used to clean it up apparently made it even worse – 52-times more toxic. That’s according to new research from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes (UAA), Mexico.The study found that mixing the dispersant with oil increased toxicity of the mixture up to 52-fold over the oil alone. In toxicity tests in the lab, the mixture’s effects increased mortality of rotifers, a microscopic grazing animal at the base of the Gulf’s food web. The findings are published online by the journal Environmental Pollution and will appear in the February 2013 print edition.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/cleanup-efforts-made-gulf-52-times-more-toxic

    Cleanup Efforts Made Gulf 52 Times More Toxic

    If the 4.9 million barrels of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 Deep Water Horizon spill was a ecological disaster, the two million gallons of dispersant used to clean it up apparently made it even worse – 52-times more toxic. That’s according to new research from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes (UAA), Mexico.

    The study found that mixing the dispersant with oil increased toxicity of the mixture up to 52-fold over the oil alone. In toxicity tests in the lab, the mixture’s effects increased mortality of rotifers, a microscopic grazing animal at the base of the Gulf’s food web. The findings are published online by the journal Environmental Pollution and will appear in the February 2013 print edition.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/cleanup-efforts-made-gulf-52-times-more-toxic

  10. 50 Notes
  11. Two Still Missing From Gulf Oil Rig Explosion This Morning

    An explosion and fire ripped through a Gulf oil platform this morning as workers used a cutting torch, sending four people to a hospital with burns and leaving two missing in waters off Louisiana.

    Coast Guard Capt. Ed Cubanski told a news conference in New Orleans the well was not producing at the time and no oil was leaking. A small amount of oil spilled from the rig when workers using a torch cut into a 75-foot-long, 3-inch-wide line on the platform. Cubanski said a sheen one-half mile long and 200 yards wide was reported in the area. “It’s not going to be an uncontrolled discharge from everything we’re getting right now,” Cubanski said.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/11/two-still-missing-gulf-oil-rig-explosion-morning

  12. 5 Notes
  13. SEARCHING FOR COUSTEAU



    By Tim Studt, Editor in Chief

    I often wonder what Jacques Cousteau would say about the state of affairs of the world’s oceans. What would he think about the floating islands of plastic garbage in the Pacific twice the size of Texas, or about rapid ocean acidification linked to increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, or about changing ocean currents because of melting icecaps and glaciers, or about BP’s Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico? These are all concerns that either didn’t exist to any major degree or weren’t even considered more than 13 years ago when Cousteau died at the age of 87.

    Cousteau was the preeminent ecologist, scientist, innovator and researcher of the world’s oceans in the 20th century. Other than his sons, there was no one who even came close to capturing the attention and minds of the world about the sea, its beauty, its breadth and its fragility. And there has been no one since him to pick up that standard.

    My very first job following graduation from Illinois Institute of Technology was to work on ocean research for Westinghouse Electric Corp. in its Chesapeake Bay facility near Annapolis, Md. My job involved the design of electronic control systems for U.S. Navy submersibles and as such I followed with interest the state of affairs of ocean research.

    Over the past 20 years, I’ve watched with dismay as ocean research has been mostly neglected by the U.S. Federal Government. We now find ourselves surrounded by environmental problems that we don’t know how to solve or what their effects will even bring. If nothing else, the Deepwater Horizon situation has been a call to arms that we have problems in the ocean that we need to know more about—we need more ocean research!

    Click to read more