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  1. Global Soundscapes Day to Record Sounds of EarthA Purdue Univ. researcher is collaborating with partners around the globe for a special Earth Day experience on Tuesday, April 22, designed to capture up to 1 million natural sound recordings and upload them for preservation.Global Soundscapes Day, led by Purdue ecologist Bryan Pijanowski, will shine the spotlight on the importance of natural soundscapes and the potential for growing research and encouraging middle school and high school students about the career potentials in this field.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/global-soundscapes-day-record-sounds-earth

    Global Soundscapes Day to Record Sounds of Earth

    A Purdue Univ. researcher is collaborating with partners around the globe for a special Earth Day experience on Tuesday, April 22, designed to capture up to 1 million natural sound recordings and upload them for preservation.

    Global Soundscapes Day, led by Purdue ecologist Bryan Pijanowski, will shine the spotlight on the importance of natural soundscapes and the potential for growing research and encouraging middle school and high school students about the career potentials in this field.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/global-soundscapes-day-record-sounds-earth

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  3. Forensic Genomics Solves Case of the Red Abalone Die-offIn August 2011, thousands of dead red abalone washed up on the beaches of Sonoma County in Northern California. At the time, the cause was unknown. Now, scientists, including a biologist from UC Davis, have learned that a harmful algal bloom was to blame: the causative agent Yessotoxin.While discovery of the cause itself is noteworthy, the method by which it was determined could have a profound effect on how wildlife mortality events are investigated in the future. Described in a study published in Nature Communications, the researchers call this new approach “forensic genomics.” It involves a combination of field surveys, toxin testing and genomic scans.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/forensic-genomics-solves-case-red-abalone-die

    Forensic Genomics Solves Case of the Red Abalone Die-off

    In August 2011, thousands of dead red abalone washed up on the beaches of Sonoma County in Northern California. At the time, the cause was unknown. Now, scientists, including a biologist from UC Davis, have learned that a harmful algal bloom was to blame: the causative agent Yessotoxin.

    While discovery of the cause itself is noteworthy, the method by which it was determined could have a profound effect on how wildlife mortality events are investigated in the future. Described in a study published in Nature Communications, the researchers call this new approach “forensic genomics.” It involves a combination of field surveys, toxin testing and genomic scans.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/forensic-genomics-solves-case-red-abalone-die

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  5. Coffee is Getting Less GreenThe proportion of land used to cultivate shade grown coffee, relative to the total land area of coffee cultivation, has fallen by nearly 20 percent globally since 1996, according to a new study by scientists from Univ. of Texas at Austin and five other institutions.The study’s authors say the global shift toward a more intensive style of coffee farming is probably having a negative effect on the environment, communities and individual farmers.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/coffee-getting-less-green

    Coffee is Getting Less Green

    The proportion of land used to cultivate shade grown coffee, relative to the total land area of coffee cultivation, has fallen by nearly 20 percent globally since 1996, according to a new study by scientists from Univ. of Texas at Austin and five other institutions.

    The study’s authors say the global shift toward a more intensive style of coffee farming is probably having a negative effect on the environment, communities and individual farmers.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/coffee-getting-less-green

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  7. Puget Sound’s Waters Come from Deep CanyonThe headwaters for Puget Sound’s famously rich waters lie far below the surface, in a submarine canyon that draws nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean. New measurements may explain how the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters are able to support so many shellfish, salmon runs and even the occasional pod of whales.Univ. of Washington oceanographers made the first detailed measurements at the headwater’s source, a submarine canyon offshore from the strait that separates the U.S. and Canada. Observations show water surging up through the canyon and mixing at surprisingly high rates, according to a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/puget-sound%E2%80%99s-waters-come-deep-canyon

    Puget Sound’s Waters Come from Deep Canyon

    The headwaters for Puget Sound’s famously rich waters lie far below the surface, in a submarine canyon that draws nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean. New measurements may explain how the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters are able to support so many shellfish, salmon runs and even the occasional pod of whales.

    Univ. of Washington oceanographers made the first detailed measurements at the headwater’s source, a submarine canyon offshore from the strait that separates the U.S. and Canada. Observations show water surging up through the canyon and mixing at surprisingly high rates, according to a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/puget-sound%E2%80%99s-waters-come-deep-canyon

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  9. Nutrient-rich Forests Store More CarbonThe ability of forests to sequester carbon from the atmosphere depends on nutrients available in the forest soils, shows new research from an international team of researchers, including the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.The study showed that forests growing in fertile soils, with ample nutrients, are able to sequester about 30 percent of the carbon that they take up during photosynthesis. In contrast, forests growing in nutrient-poor soils may retain only 6 percent of that carbon. The rest is returned to the atmosphere as respiration.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nutrient-rich-forests-store-more-carbon

    Nutrient-rich Forests Store More Carbon

    The ability of forests to sequester carbon from the atmosphere depends on nutrients available in the forest soils, shows new research from an international team of researchers, including the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

    The study showed that forests growing in fertile soils, with ample nutrients, are able to sequester about 30 percent of the carbon that they take up during photosynthesis. In contrast, forests growing in nutrient-poor soils may retain only 6 percent of that carbon. The rest is returned to the atmosphere as respiration.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nutrient-rich-forests-store-more-carbon

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  11. Arctic Ozone Hole is Comparatively TameSince the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, scientists, policymakers, and the public have wondered whether we might someday see a similarly extreme depletion of ozone over the Arctic.But a new MIT study finds some cause for optimism: ozone levels in the Arctic haven’t yet sunk to the extreme lows seen in Antarctica, in part because international efforts to limit ozone-depleting chemicals have been successful.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/arctic-ozone-hole-comparatively-tame

    Arctic Ozone Hole is Comparatively Tame

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, scientists, policymakers, and the public have wondered whether we might someday see a similarly extreme depletion of ozone over the Arctic.

    But a new MIT study finds some cause for optimism: ozone levels in the Arctic haven’t yet sunk to the extreme lows seen in Antarctica, in part because international efforts to limit ozone-depleting chemicals have been successful.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/arctic-ozone-hole-comparatively-tame

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  13. Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to SmellFish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fish-acidic-waters-less-able-smell

    Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to Smell

    Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.

    The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fish-acidic-waters-less-able-smell

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  15. Statistics Rule out Natural-warming HypothesisAn analysis of temperature data since 1500 all but rules out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the earth’s climate, according to a new study by McGill Univ. physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.The study, published in Climate Dynamics, represents a new approach to the question of whether global warming in the industrial era has been caused largely by man-made emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Rather than using complex computer models to estimate the effects of greenhouse-gas emissions, Lovejoy examines historical data to assess the competing hypothesis: that warming over the past century is due to natural long-term variations in temperature.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/statistics-rule-out-natural-warming-hypothesis

    Statistics Rule out Natural-warming Hypothesis

    An analysis of temperature data since 1500 all but rules out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the earth’s climate, according to a new study by McGill Univ. physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

    The study, published in Climate Dynamics, represents a new approach to the question of whether global warming in the industrial era has been caused largely by man-made emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Rather than using complex computer models to estimate the effects of greenhouse-gas emissions, Lovejoy examines historical data to assess the competing hypothesis: that warming over the past century is due to natural long-term variations in temperature.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/statistics-rule-out-natural-warming-hypothesis

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  17. U.N. to Consider GeoengineeringIt’s Plan B in the fight against climate change: cooling the planet by sucking heat-trapping CO2 from the air or reflecting sunlight back into space.Called geoengineering, it’s considered mad science by opponents. Supporters say it would be foolish to ignore it, since plan A — slashing carbon emissions from fossil fuels — is moving so slowly.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/un-consider-geoengineering

    U.N. to Consider Geoengineering

    It’s Plan B in the fight against climate change: cooling the planet by sucking heat-trapping CO2 from the air or reflecting sunlight back into space.

    Called geoengineering, it’s considered mad science by opponents. Supporters say it would be foolish to ignore it, since plan A — slashing carbon emissions from fossil fuels — is moving so slowly.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/un-consider-geoengineering

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  19. Climate Change Slowdown Linked to Sea Surface TempThe recent slowdown in the warming rate of the Northern Hemisphere may be a result of internal variability of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation — a natural phenomenon related to sea surface temperatures, according to Penn State researchers."Some researchers have in the past attributed a portion of Northern Hemispheric warming to a warm phase of the AMO," says Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology. "The true AMO signal, instead, appears likely to have been in a cooling phase in recent decades, offsetting some of the anthropogenic warming temporarily."Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/climate-change-slow-down-linked-sea-surface-temp

    Climate Change Slowdown Linked to Sea Surface Temp

    The recent slowdown in the warming rate of the Northern Hemisphere may be a result of internal variability of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation — a natural phenomenon related to sea surface temperatures, according to Penn State researchers.

    "Some researchers have in the past attributed a portion of Northern Hemispheric warming to a warm phase of the AMO," says Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology. "The true AMO signal, instead, appears likely to have been in a cooling phase in recent decades, offsetting some of the anthropogenic warming temporarily."

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/climate-change-slow-down-linked-sea-surface-temp

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  21. Disaster-monitoring Satellite Launched SuccessfullyThe European Space Agency says Friday it has successfully launched the first in a series of satellites that will form the nucleus of its new Copernicus monitoring system, which is aimed at providing better and quicker information about natural disasters and other catastrophes.The Sentinel-1A satellite, which lifted off on a Russian Soyuz rocket launched from French Guiana late Thursday night, unfolded its antennae and locked them into place early Friday morning and has been accurately placed into orbit, the agency says.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/disaster-monitoring-satellite-launched-successfully

    Disaster-monitoring Satellite Launched Successfully

    The European Space Agency says Friday it has successfully launched the first in a series of satellites that will form the nucleus of its new Copernicus monitoring system, which is aimed at providing better and quicker information about natural disasters and other catastrophes.

    The Sentinel-1A satellite, which lifted off on a Russian Soyuz rocket launched from French Guiana late Thursday night, unfolded its antennae and locked them into place early Friday morning and has been accurately placed into orbit, the agency says.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/disaster-monitoring-satellite-launched-successfully

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  23. Researchers ‘Design’ Greener TreesResearchers have genetically engineered trees that will break down to produce paper and biofuel more easily. This breakthrough will mean using fewer chemicals, less energy and creating fewer environmental pollutants.“One of the largest impediments for the pulp and paper industry as well as the emerging biofuel industry is a polymer found in wood known as lignin,” says Shawn Mansfield, a professor of Wood Science at the Univ. of British Columbia.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/researchers-design-greener-trees

    Researchers ‘Design’ Greener Trees

    Researchers have genetically engineered trees that will break down to produce paper and biofuel more easily. This breakthrough will mean using fewer chemicals, less energy and creating fewer environmental pollutants.

    “One of the largest impediments for the pulp and paper industry as well as the emerging biofuel industry is a polymer found in wood known as lignin,” says Shawn Mansfield, a professor of Wood Science at the Univ. of British Columbia.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/researchers-design-greener-trees

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  25. Sandy Soil Deforestation is Greater Climate ThreatDeforestation may have far greater consequences for climate change in some soils than in others, according to new research led by Yale Univ. scientists. This find could provide critical insights into which ecosystems must be managed with extra care because they are vulnerable to biodiversity loss and which ecosystems are more resilient to widespread tree removal.In a comprehensive analysis of soil collected from 11 distinct U.S. regions, from Hawaii to northern Alaska, researchers found that the extent to which deforestation disturbs underground microbial communities that regulate the loss of carbon into the atmosphere depends almost exclusively on the texture of the soil. The results were published in the journal Global Change Biology.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/sandy-soil-deforestation-greater-climate-threat

    Sandy Soil Deforestation is Greater Climate Threat

    Deforestation may have far greater consequences for climate change in some soils than in others, according to new research led by Yale Univ. scientists. This find could provide critical insights into which ecosystems must be managed with extra care because they are vulnerable to biodiversity loss and which ecosystems are more resilient to widespread tree removal.

    In a comprehensive analysis of soil collected from 11 distinct U.S. regions, from Hawaii to northern Alaska, researchers found that the extent to which deforestation disturbs underground microbial communities that regulate the loss of carbon into the atmosphere depends almost exclusively on the texture of the soil. The results were published in the journal Global Change Biology.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/sandy-soil-deforestation-greater-climate-threat

  26. 22 Notes
  27. Invading Shrubs Shift Soil MicrobesPerched high on the bluffs of the big river valleys in the Midwest are some of the last remnants of never-farmed prairie grasslands. These patches, edged by forest, are slowly being taken over by shrubs. A recent Univ. of Illinois study examined the soil microbes on nine patches, also called “balds,” which had varying degrees of shrub invasion, and found an interesting shift in the composition of the microbial community.“When we looked at the soil samples from a lightly encroached hill prairie remnant, it was very clear that there was a set of fungi that look like grassland fungi, a set of fungi that look like tree fungi, and the shrubs between the two have some features of both,” says U of I microbial ecologist Tony Yannarell. “As the degree of shrub encroachment increased, the amount of change in the fungal communities also increased, and as the degree of shrub encroachment increased, that shrub fungi joined the forest group to become one big woody community.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/invading-shrubs-shift-soil-microbes

    Invading Shrubs Shift Soil Microbes

    Perched high on the bluffs of the big river valleys in the Midwest are some of the last remnants of never-farmed prairie grasslands. These patches, edged by forest, are slowly being taken over by shrubs. A recent Univ. of Illinois study examined the soil microbes on nine patches, also called “balds,” which had varying degrees of shrub invasion, and found an interesting shift in the composition of the microbial community.

    “When we looked at the soil samples from a lightly encroached hill prairie remnant, it was very clear that there was a set of fungi that look like grassland fungi, a set of fungi that look like tree fungi, and the shrubs between the two have some features of both,” says U of I microbial ecologist Tony Yannarell. “As the degree of shrub encroachment increased, the amount of change in the fungal communities also increased, and as the degree of shrub encroachment increased, that shrub fungi joined the forest group to become one big woody community.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/invading-shrubs-shift-soil-microbes

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  29. Tropical Ecosystems Are Under ThreatScientists at the Univ. of Liverpool have found that tropical grassy areas, which play a critical role in the world’s ecology, are under threat as a result of ineffective management.According to research, published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, they are often misclassified and this leads to degradation of the land which has a detrimental effect on the plants and animals that are indigenous to these areas.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/tropical-ecosystems-are-under-threat

    Tropical Ecosystems Are Under Threat

    Scientists at the Univ. of Liverpool have found that tropical grassy areas, which play a critical role in the world’s ecology, are under threat as a result of ineffective management.

    According to research, published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, they are often misclassified and this leads to degradation of the land which has a detrimental effect on the plants and animals that are indigenous to these areas.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/tropical-ecosystems-are-under-threat

  30. 9 Notes