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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Better Engine Design is on Road to Meeting StandardsAn engine design appearing under the hoods of many new cars and light trucks today is close to meeting the latest pollution standards that will require vehicles to emit fewer harmful particles over their lifetimes, scientists are reporting. The new study on emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) technology appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/better-engine-design-road-meeting-standards

    Better Engine Design is on Road to Meeting Standards

    An engine design appearing under the hoods of many new cars and light trucks today is close to meeting the latest pollution standards that will require vehicles to emit fewer harmful particles over their lifetimes, scientists are reporting. The new study on emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) technology appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/better-engine-design-road-meeting-standards

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  3. Sensor Will Extend Life of High-Temperature EnginesA temperature sensor developed by researchers at the Univ. of Cambridge could improve the efficiency, control and safety of high-temperature engines. The sensor minimizes drift –degradation of the sensor which results in faulty temperature readings and reduces the longevity of engine components.The new sensor, or thermocouple, has been shown to reduce drift by 80 percent at temperatures of 1,200 C, and by 90 percent at 1,300 C, potentially doubling the lifespan of engine components. The results are published in the September issue of the Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/sensor-will-extend-life-high-temperature-engines

    Sensor Will Extend Life of High-Temperature Engines

    A temperature sensor developed by researchers at the Univ. of Cambridge could improve the efficiency, control and safety of high-temperature engines. The sensor minimizes drift –degradation of the sensor which results in faulty temperature readings and reduces the longevity of engine components.

    The new sensor, or thermocouple, has been shown to reduce drift by 80 percent at temperatures of 1,200 C, and by 90 percent at 1,300 C, potentially doubling the lifespan of engine components. The results are published in the September issue of the Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/sensor-will-extend-life-high-temperature-engines

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  5. Low-Temp Combustion Enables Better EnginesAs demand climbs for more fuel-efficient vehicles, knowledge compiled over several years about diesel engines and a new strategy known as low-temperature combustion (LTC) might soon lead auto manufacturers and consumers to broader use of cleaner diesel engines in the U.S.The journal Progress in Energy and Combustion Science published a summary of recent research on diesel LTC in a review article. The article, prepared by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, provides what the authors say is a necessary science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more fuel-efficient engines using LTC.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/low-temp-combustion-enables-better-engines

    Low-Temp Combustion Enables Better Engines

    As demand climbs for more fuel-efficient vehicles, knowledge compiled over several years about diesel engines and a new strategy known as low-temperature combustion (LTC) might soon lead auto manufacturers and consumers to broader use of cleaner diesel engines in the U.S.

    The journal Progress in Energy and Combustion Science published a summary of recent research on diesel LTC in a review article. The article, prepared by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, provides what the authors say is a necessary science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more fuel-efficient engines using LTC.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/low-temp-combustion-enables-better-engines

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  7. NASA Tests 3D-Printed Rocket Engine Injector

    NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne recently finished testing a rocket engine injector made through additive manufacturing, or 3D printing.

    This space technology demonstration may lead to more efficient manufacturing of rocket engines, saving American companies time and money. NASA’s Glenn Research Center conducted the successful tests for Aerojet Rocketdyne through a non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/nasa-tests-3d-printed-rocket-engine-injector

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  9. Ethanol May Cause Engine DamageIt’s a dilemma for drivers: do they choose a gasoline that’s cheaper and cleaner even if, as opponents say, it could damage older cars and motorcycles?That’s the peril and promise of a high-ethanol blend of gasoline known as E15. The fuel contains 15 percent ethanol, well above the current 10 percent norm sold at most U.S. gas stations.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/ethanol-may-cause-engine-damage

    Ethanol May Cause Engine Damage

    It’s a dilemma for drivers: do they choose a gasoline that’s cheaper and cleaner even if, as opponents say, it could damage older cars and motorcycles?

    That’s the peril and promise of a high-ethanol blend of gasoline known as E15. The fuel contains 15 percent ethanol, well above the current 10 percent norm sold at most U.S. gas stations.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/ethanol-may-cause-engine-damage

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  11. Amazon CEO Recovers Apollo Engines from AtlanticRusted pieces of two Apollo-era rocket engines that helped boost astronauts to the moon have been fished out of the murky depths of the Atlantic, Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos and NASA say.A privately funded expedition led by Bezos raised the main engine parts during three weeks at sea and was headed back to Cape Canaveral, Florida, the launch pad for the manned lunar missions. “We’ve seen an underwater wonderland — an incredible sculpture garden of twisted F-1 engines that tells the story of a fiery and violent end,” Bezos writes in an online posting.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/amazon-ceo-recovers-apollo-engines-atlantic

    Amazon CEO Recovers Apollo Engines from Atlantic

    Rusted pieces of two Apollo-era rocket engines that helped boost astronauts to the moon have been fished out of the murky depths of the Atlantic, Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos and NASA say.

    A privately funded expedition led by Bezos raised the main engine parts during three weeks at sea and was headed back to Cape Canaveral, Florida, the launch pad for the manned lunar missions. “We’ve seen an underwater wonderland — an incredible sculpture garden of twisted F-1 engines that tells the story of a fiery and violent end,” Bezos writes in an online posting.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/amazon-ceo-recovers-apollo-engines-atlantic

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  13. Jet Engine Manufacturer Discloses Fraudulent Tests

    Jet engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney says it’s uncovered fraudulent testing of engine parts in Israel, but that no recalls or other problems resulted.

    The subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. says that an investigation was initiated in June 2011 when an employee anonymously alleged that test data had been altered over 15 years at Carmel Forge, another United Technologies unit, in Israel.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/03/jet-engine-manufacturer-discloses-fraudulent-tests

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  15. NASA Tests Old Apollo 11 Engine for Future IdeasLike vinyl records and skinny ties, things eventually come back around. At NASA, that means looking to the Apollo program for ideas on how to develop the next generation of rockets for future missions to the moon and beyond. Young engineers who weren’t even born when the last Saturn V rocket took off for the moon are testing a vintage engine from the program.The engine, known to NASA engineers as No. F-6049, was supposed to help propel Apollo 11 into orbit in 1969, when NASA sent Neil Armstrong and two other astronauts to the moon for the first time. The flight went off without a hitch, but no thanks to the engine — it was grounded because of a glitch during a test in Mississippi and later sent to the Smithsonian Institution, where it sat for years.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/nasa-tests-old-apollo-11-engine-future-ideas

    NASA Tests Old Apollo 11 Engine for Future Ideas

    Like vinyl records and skinny ties, things eventually come back around. At NASA, that means looking to the Apollo program for ideas on how to develop the next generation of rockets for future missions to the moon and beyond. Young engineers who weren’t even born when the last Saturn V rocket took off for the moon are testing a vintage engine from the program.

    The engine, known to NASA engineers as No. F-6049, was supposed to help propel Apollo 11 into orbit in 1969, when NASA sent Neil Armstrong and two other astronauts to the moon for the first time. The flight went off without a hitch, but no thanks to the engine — it was grounded because of a glitch during a test in Mississippi and later sent to the Smithsonian Institution, where it sat for years.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/nasa-tests-old-apollo-11-engine-future-ideas

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  17. Ultrasound Key to More Efficient EnginesA system that uses ultrasound technology to look inside car engines could lead to more efficient engines – and huge fuel savings for motorists.Ultrasound scans have long been a fundamental tool in healthcare for looking inside the human body, but they have never before been put to use in testing the health of a modern combustion engine. In the Univ. of Sheffield’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rob Dwyer-Joyce, professor of lubrication engineering, has devised a method of using ultrasound to measure how efficiently an engine’s pistons are moving up and down inside their cylinders.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/ultrasound-key-more-efficient-engines

    Ultrasound Key to More Efficient Engines

    A system that uses ultrasound technology to look inside car engines could lead to more efficient engines – and huge fuel savings for motorists.

    Ultrasound scans have long been a fundamental tool in healthcare for looking inside the human body, but they have never before been put to use in testing the health of a modern combustion engine. In the Univ. of Sheffield’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rob Dwyer-Joyce, professor of lubrication engineering, has devised a method of using ultrasound to measure how efficiently an engine’s pistons are moving up and down inside their cylinders.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/ultrasound-key-more-efficient-engines

  18. 8 Notes