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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. High-priced Pill Shocks U.S. Healthcare SystemYour money or your life? Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000.Leading medical societies recommend the drug as a first-line treatment, and patients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, officials propose to limit how many low-income patients can get Sovaldi.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/high-priced-pill-shocks-us-healthcare-system

    High-priced Pill Shocks U.S. Healthcare System

    Your money or your life? Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000.

    Leading medical societies recommend the drug as a first-line treatment, and patients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, officials propose to limit how many low-income patients can get Sovaldi.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/high-priced-pill-shocks-us-healthcare-system

  2. 94 Notes
  3. Fungus May Drive Up Coffee PricesThe U.S. government is stepping up efforts to help Central American farmers fight a devastating coffee disease — and hold down the price of your morning cup.At issue is a fungus called coffee rust that has caused more than $1 billion in damage across Latin American region. The fungus is especially deadly to Arabica coffee, the bean that makes up most high-end, specialty coffees. Already, it is affecting the price of some of those coffees in the U.S.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/fungus-may-drive-coffee-prices

    Fungus May Drive Up Coffee Prices

    The U.S. government is stepping up efforts to help Central American farmers fight a devastating coffee disease — and hold down the price of your morning cup.

    At issue is a fungus called coffee rust that has caused more than $1 billion in damage across Latin American region. The fungus is especially deadly to Arabica coffee, the bean that makes up most high-end, specialty coffees. Already, it is affecting the price of some of those coffees in the U.S.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/fungus-may-drive-coffee-prices

  4. 24 Notes
  5. Free Gym-based Exercise Programs are Underutilized
 Eliminating financial barriers to a fitness center as well as providing physician support, a pleasant environment and trained fitness staff did not result in widespread membership activation or consistent attendance among low income, multi-ethnic women with chronic disease risk factors or diagnoses according to a new study from Boston Univ. Medical Center. The findings, published in Journal of Community Health, is believed to be the first study of its kind to examine patient characteristics associated with utilization of community health center- based exercise referral program.Currently, fewer than half (47.3 percent) of Americans meet expert recommendations of 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity exercise. Women are less likely than men to meet guidelines for physical activity. Certain subpopulations are at elevated risk for both inactivity and CMD, including Hispanics, African Americans and those below the poverty level.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/free-gym-based-exercise-program-underutilized

    Free Gym-based Exercise Programs are Underutilized


    Eliminating financial barriers to a fitness center as well as providing physician support, a pleasant environment and trained fitness staff did not result in widespread membership activation or consistent attendance among low income, multi-ethnic women with chronic disease risk factors or diagnoses according to a new study from Boston Univ. Medical Center. The findings, published in Journal of Community Health, is believed to be the first study of its kind to examine patient characteristics associated with utilization of community health center- based exercise referral program.

    Currently, fewer than half (47.3 percent) of Americans meet expert recommendations of 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity exercise. Women are less likely than men to meet guidelines for physical activity. Certain subpopulations are at elevated risk for both inactivity and CMD, including Hispanics, African Americans and those below the poverty level.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/free-gym-based-exercise-program-underutilized

  6. 12 Notes
  7. Health Law Gives Pregnant Women New OptionsThe health care law has opened up an unusual opportunity for some mothers-to-be to save on medical bills for childbirth.Lower-income women who signed up for a private policy in the new insurance exchanges will have access to additional coverage from their state’s Medicaid program if they get pregnant. Some women could save hundreds of dollars on their share of hospital and doctor bills.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/health-law-gives-pregnant-women-new-options

    Health Law Gives Pregnant Women New Options

    The health care law has opened up an unusual opportunity for some mothers-to-be to save on medical bills for childbirth.

    Lower-income women who signed up for a private policy in the new insurance exchanges will have access to additional coverage from their state’s Medicaid program if they get pregnant. Some women could save hundreds of dollars on their share of hospital and doctor bills.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/health-law-gives-pregnant-women-new-options

  8. 10 Notes
  9. Piglet-killing Virus to Drive Up Bacon PriceA virus never before seen in the U.S. has killed millions of piglets in less than a year and, with little known about how it spreads or how to stop it, it’s threatening pork production and pushing up prices by 10 percent or more.Scientists think porcine epidemic diarrhea, which does not infect humans or other animals, came from China, but they don’t know how it got into the country or spread to 27 states since last May. The federal government is looking into how such viruses might spread, while the pork industry, wary of future outbreaks, has committed $1.7 million to research the disease.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/piglet-killing-virus-drive-bacon-price

    Piglet-killing Virus to Drive Up Bacon Price

    A virus never before seen in the U.S. has killed millions of piglets in less than a year and, with little known about how it spreads or how to stop it, it’s threatening pork production and pushing up prices by 10 percent or more.

    Scientists think porcine epidemic diarrhea, which does not infect humans or other animals, came from China, but they don’t know how it got into the country or spread to 27 states since last May. The federal government is looking into how such viruses might spread, while the pork industry, wary of future outbreaks, has committed $1.7 million to research the disease.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/piglet-killing-virus-drive-bacon-price

  10. 30 Notes
  11. Experts Question Price of New Hep C Drug

    An innovative hepatitis C drug that was only recently hailed as a breakthrough treatment is facing skepticism from some health care providers, as they consider whether it is worth the $1,000-a-pill price set by manufacturer Gilead Sciences Inc.

    A panel of California medical experts voted that Gilead’s Sovaldi represents a “low value” treatment, considering its cost compared with older drugs for the blood-borne virus.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/experts-question-price-new-hep-c-drug

  12. 12 Notes
  13. Cost of Fruits, Vegetables Linked to Kids’ BMIHigh prices for fresh fruits and vegetables are associated with higher Body Mass Index (BMI) in young children in low- and middle-income households, according to American Univ. researchers in the journal Pediatrics.“There is a small, but significant, association between the prices of fruit and vegetables and higher child BMI,” says Taryn Morrissey, the study’s lead author and assistant professor of public administration and policy at AU’s School of Public Affairs.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/cost-fruits-vegetables-linked-kids-bmi

    Cost of Fruits, Vegetables Linked to Kids’ BMI

    High prices for fresh fruits and vegetables are associated with higher Body Mass Index (BMI) in young children in low- and middle-income households, according to American Univ. researchers in the journal Pediatrics.

    “There is a small, but significant, association between the prices of fruit and vegetables and higher child BMI,” says Taryn Morrissey, the study’s lead author and assistant professor of public administration and policy at AU’s School of Public Affairs.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/cost-fruits-vegetables-linked-kids-bmi

  14. 28 Notes
  15. As Ores Get Poorer, Mines Must Cut CostsDealing with mineral ores is rapidly becoming more complex: as ore grade is decreasing, mines are getting deeper and the cost of energy and labor increases.The minerals industry has seen an increase in production costs of 70 percent since the mid-1980s and ore quality has, on average, declined by 50 percent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/ores-get-poorer-mines-must-cut-costs

    As Ores Get Poorer, Mines Must Cut Costs

    Dealing with mineral ores is rapidly becoming more complex: as ore grade is decreasing, mines are getting deeper and the cost of energy and labor increases.

    The minerals industry has seen an increase in production costs of 70 percent since the mid-1980s and ore quality has, on average, declined by 50 percent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/ores-get-poorer-mines-must-cut-costs

  16. 12 Notes
  17. Sensor Stops Use of Excess Salt on RoadsEngineers at Carlos III Univ. have designed an optical sensor that detects how much salt is on road surfaces in real time. This avoids the need to spread the substance excessively, because although this prevents ice from forming on roads, it can also harm vehicles, infrastructure and the environment.It is common to spread salt on roads to prevent ice and the hazards it can entail for traffic. This preventive treatment is based on weather forecasts, but does not take into account that the road can already have enough salt, scattered during previous frost and snowfall.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/sensor-stops-use-excess-salt-roads

    Sensor Stops Use of Excess Salt on Roads

    Engineers at Carlos III Univ. have designed an optical sensor that detects how much salt is on road surfaces in real time. This avoids the need to spread the substance excessively, because although this prevents ice from forming on roads, it can also harm vehicles, infrastructure and the environment.

    It is common to spread salt on roads to prevent ice and the hazards it can entail for traffic. This preventive treatment is based on weather forecasts, but does not take into account that the road can already have enough salt, scattered during previous frost and snowfall.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/sensor-stops-use-excess-salt-roads

  18. 16 Notes
  19. Even Believers Don’t Put High Value on Climate ProtectionPeople are bad at getting a grip on collective risks. Climate change is a good example of this: the annual climate summits have so far not led to specific measures. The reason for this is that people attach greater value to an immediate material reward than to investing in future quality of life. Therefore, cooperative behavior in climate protection must be more strongly associated with short-term incentives such as rewards or being held in high esteem.Would you rather have €40 or save the climate? When the question is put in such stark terms, the common sense answer is obviously: “stop climate change!” After all, we are well-informed individuals who act for the common good and, more particularly, for the good of future generations. Or at least that’s how we like to think of ourselves.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/even-believers-dont-put-high-value-climate-protection

    Even Believers Don’t Put High Value on Climate Protection

    People are bad at getting a grip on collective risks. Climate change is a good example of this: the annual climate summits have so far not led to specific measures. The reason for this is that people attach greater value to an immediate material reward than to investing in future quality of life. Therefore, cooperative behavior in climate protection must be more strongly associated with short-term incentives such as rewards or being held in high esteem.

    Would you rather have €40 or save the climate? When the question is put in such stark terms, the common sense answer is obviously: “stop climate change!” After all, we are well-informed individuals who act for the common good and, more particularly, for the good of future generations. Or at least that’s how we like to think of ourselves.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/even-believers-dont-put-high-value-climate-protection

  20. 26 Notes
  21. Ethanol Doesn’t Meaningfully Reduce Gas PricesIf you have stopped at a gas station recently, there is a good chance your auto has consumed fuel with ethanol blended into it. Yet the price of gasoline is not substantially affected by the volume of its ethanol content, according to a paper co-authored by an MIT economist. The study seeks to rebut the claim, broadly aired over the past couple of years, that widespread use of ethanol has reduced the wholesale cost of gasoline by $0.89 to $1.09 per gallon.Whatever the benefits or drawbacks of ethanol, MIT’s Christopher Knittel says, price issues are not among them right now.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/ethanol-doesnt-meaningfully-reduce-gas-prices

    Ethanol Doesn’t Meaningfully Reduce Gas Prices

    If you have stopped at a gas station recently, there is a good chance your auto has consumed fuel with ethanol blended into it. Yet the price of gasoline is not substantially affected by the volume of its ethanol content, according to a paper co-authored by an MIT economist. The study seeks to rebut the claim, broadly aired over the past couple of years, that widespread use of ethanol has reduced the wholesale cost of gasoline by $0.89 to $1.09 per gallon.

    Whatever the benefits or drawbacks of ethanol, MIT’s Christopher Knittel says, price issues are not among them right now.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/ethanol-doesnt-meaningfully-reduce-gas-prices

  22. 11 Notes
  23. Scientists Rig Blood Flow Imager on the CheapTracking blood flow in the laboratory is an important tool for studying ailments like migraines or strokes and designing new ways to address them. Blood flow is also routinely measured in the clinic, and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is one way of measuring these changes; however, this technique requires professional-grade imaging equipment, which limits its use.Now, using $90 worth of off-the-shelf commercial parts including a webcam and a laser pointer, researchers at the Univ. of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) have duplicated the performance of expensive, scientific-grade LSCI instruments at a fraction of the cost. The work is the first to show that it is possible to make a reliable blood flow imaging system solely with inexpensive parts, the authors say.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/scientists-rig-blood-flow-imager-cheap

    Scientists Rig Blood Flow Imager on the Cheap

    Tracking blood flow in the laboratory is an important tool for studying ailments like migraines or strokes and designing new ways to address them. Blood flow is also routinely measured in the clinic, and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is one way of measuring these changes; however, this technique requires professional-grade imaging equipment, which limits its use.

    Now, using $90 worth of off-the-shelf commercial parts including a webcam and a laser pointer, researchers at the Univ. of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) have duplicated the performance of expensive, scientific-grade LSCI instruments at a fraction of the cost. The work is the first to show that it is possible to make a reliable blood flow imaging system solely with inexpensive parts, the authors say.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/scientists-rig-blood-flow-imager-cheap

  24. 33 Notes
  25. Wetlands are Cheaper than Treatment Plants But May Have Social CostsRemoving nitrogen from the environment “the natural way” by creating a wetland is a long-term, nutrient-removal solution, more cost effective than upgrading a wastewater treatment plant, but it isn’t necessarily socially beneficial to offer landowners multiple payments for the environmental services that flow from such wetlands, according to a study conducted at the Univ. of Illinois."In the areas we studied in Bureau County with small wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), it was much cheaper to do pollution control by installing just a few wetlands than it was to have the WWTPs do the upgrades that would be necessary to achieve the same thing," says U of I environmental economist Amy Ando.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/wetlands-are-cheaper-treatment-plants-may-have-social-costs

    Wetlands are Cheaper than Treatment Plants But May Have Social Costs

    Removing nitrogen from the environment “the natural way” by creating a wetland is a long-term, nutrient-removal solution, more cost effective than upgrading a wastewater treatment plant, but it isn’t necessarily socially beneficial to offer landowners multiple payments for the environmental services that flow from such wetlands, according to a study conducted at the Univ. of Illinois.

    "In the areas we studied in Bureau County with small wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), it was much cheaper to do pollution control by installing just a few wetlands than it was to have the WWTPs do the upgrades that would be necessary to achieve the same thing," says U of I environmental economist Amy Ando.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/wetlands-are-cheaper-treatment-plants-may-have-social-costs

  26. 13 Notes
  27. Clean Energy is Cheaper When All Factors are Considered

    It’s less costly to get electricity from wind turbines and solar panels than coal-fired power plants when climate change costs and other health impacts are factored considered, according to a new study published in Springer’s Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences.

    In fact — using the official U.S. government estimates of health and environmental costs from burning fossil fuels — the study shows it’s cheaper to replace a typical existing coal-fired power plant with a wind turbine than to keep the old plant running. And new electricity generation from wind could be more economically efficient than natural gas. The findings show the nation can cut carbon pollution from power plants in a cost-effective way, by replacing coal-fired generation with cleaner options like wind, solar and natural gas.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/clean-energy-cheaper-when-all-factors-are-considered

  28. 189 Notes
  29. U.S. Faces Cancer Care CrisisThe U.S. is facing a crisis in how to deliver cancer care, as the baby boomers reach their tumor-prone years and doctors have a hard time keeping up with complex new treatments, government advisers report.The caution comes even as scientists are learning more than ever about better ways to battle cancer, and developing innovative therapies to target tumors.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/us-faces-cancer-care-crisis

    U.S. Faces Cancer Care Crisis

    The U.S. is facing a crisis in how to deliver cancer care, as the baby boomers reach their tumor-prone years and doctors have a hard time keeping up with complex new treatments, government advisers report.

    The caution comes even as scientists are learning more than ever about better ways to battle cancer, and developing innovative therapies to target tumors.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/us-faces-cancer-care-crisis

  30. 12 Notes