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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Evidence Shows Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents CancerResearch conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.According to senior author John VandeBerg, the research was driven by the fact that, despite the increasing use of sunscreen in recent decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, continues to increase dramatically. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 75,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/evidence-shows-sunscreen-use-childhood-prevents-cancer

    Evidence Shows Sunscreen Use in Childhood Prevents Cancer

    Research conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood.

    According to senior author John VandeBerg, the research was driven by the fact that, despite the increasing use of sunscreen in recent decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, continues to increase dramatically. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 75,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/evidence-shows-sunscreen-use-childhood-prevents-cancer

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  3. Breathalyzer May Detect Deadliest CancerLung cancer causes more deaths in the U.S. than the next three most common cancers combined — colon, breast and pancreatic. The reason for the striking mortality rate is simple: poor detection. Lung cancer attacks without leaving any fingerprints, quietly afflicting its victims and metastasizing uncontrollably — to the point of no return.Now a new device developed by a team of Israeli, American and British cancer researchers may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression. The breathalyzer test, embedded with a “NaNose” nanotech chip to literally “sniff out” cancer tumors, was developed by Prof. Nir Peled of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Prof. Hossam Haick of the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology and Prof. Fred Hirsch of the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/breathalyzer-may-detect-deadliest-cancer

    Breathalyzer May Detect Deadliest Cancer

    Lung cancer causes more deaths in the U.S. than the next three most common cancers combined — colon, breast and pancreatic. The reason for the striking mortality rate is simple: poor detection. Lung cancer attacks without leaving any fingerprints, quietly afflicting its victims and metastasizing uncontrollably — to the point of no return.

    Now a new device developed by a team of Israeli, American and British cancer researchers may turn the tide by both accurately detecting lung cancer and identifying its stage of progression. The breathalyzer test, embedded with a “NaNose” nanotech chip to literally “sniff out” cancer tumors, was developed by Prof. Nir Peled of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Prof. Hossam Haick of the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology and Prof. Fred Hirsch of the Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/breathalyzer-may-detect-deadliest-cancer

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  5. No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer RiskResearchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

    No Link Found Between Soy, Endometrial Cancer Risk

    Researchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published inWiley’s BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

    Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/no-link-found-between-soy-endometrial-cancer-risk

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  7. Vaccine ‘Reprograms’ Cancers to Respond to Treatment

    Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and tested a vaccine that triggered the growth of immune cell nodules within pancreatic tumors, essentially reprogramming these intractable cancers and potentially making them vulnerable to immune-based therapies.

    In their study described in today’s issue of Cancer Immunology Research, the Johns Hopkins team tested the vaccine in 39 people with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer. The disease becomes resistant to standard chemotherapies and is particularly lethal, with fewer than 5 percent of patients surviving five years after their diagnosis.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/vaccine-reprograms-cancers-respond-treatment

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  9. Ban on Pavement Sealant Significantly Impacted LakeIn 2006, Austin, Texas, became the first city in the country to ban a commonly used pavement sealant over concerns that it was a major source of cancer-causing compounds in the environment. Eight years later, the city’s action seems to have made a big dent in the targeted compounds’ levels — researchers now report that the concentrations have dropped significantly. They published their study, which could have broad implications for other jurisdictions and public health, in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.Peter Van Metre and Barbara Mahler from the U.S. Geological Survey point out that in 2005, researchers figured out that pavement sealants made from coal tar were contributing high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment. This is a serious public concern because studies have shown that PAHs cause cancer in animals, and they likely impact human health as well.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/ban-pavement-sealant-significantly-impacted-lake

    Ban on Pavement Sealant Significantly Impacted Lake

    In 2006, Austin, Texas, became the first city in the country to ban a commonly used pavement sealant over concerns that it was a major source of cancer-causing compounds in the environment. Eight years later, the city’s action seems to have made a big dent in the targeted compounds’ levels — researchers now report that the concentrations have dropped significantly. They published their study, which could have broad implications for other jurisdictions and public health, in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

    Peter Van Metre and Barbara Mahler from the U.S. Geological Survey point out that in 2005, researchers figured out that pavement sealants made from coal tar were contributing high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment. This is a serious public concern because studies have shown that PAHs cause cancer in animals, and they likely impact human health as well.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/ban-pavement-sealant-significantly-impacted-lake

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  11. Red Meat May Be Linked to Breast CancerWomen who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.Doctors have long warned that a diet loaded with red meat is linked to cancers including those of the colon and pancreas, but there has been less evidence for its role in breast cancer.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/red-meat-may-be-linked-breast-cancer

    Red Meat May Be Linked to Breast Cancer

    Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.

    Doctors have long warned that a diet loaded with red meat is linked to cancers including those of the colon and pancreas, but there has been less evidence for its role in breast cancer.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/red-meat-may-be-linked-breast-cancer

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  13. Most Breast Cancer Patients Don’t Get Enough Exercise

    Physical activity after breast cancer diagnosis has been linked with prolonged survival and improved quality of life, but most participants in a large breast cancer study did not meet national physical activity guidelines after they were diagnosed.

    Moreover, African-American women were less likely to meet the guidelines than white women. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that efforts to promote physical activity in breast cancer patients may need to be significantly enhanced.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/most-breast-cancer-patients-dont-get-enough-exercise

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  15. Mice Can Mimic Human Breast Cancer at Gene LevelScientists have routinely used mice to replicate aspects of human breast cancer in an effort to find a cure to the most common type of cancer among women. But how effective are these preclinical models in actually mimicking the disease and giving scientists the ability to develop real comparisons?Eran Andrechek, a physiology professor in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State Univ., has discovered that many of the various models used in breast cancer research can replicate several characteristics of the human disease, especially at the gene level.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/mice-can-mimic-human-breast-cancer-gene-level

    Mice Can Mimic Human Breast Cancer at Gene Level

    Scientists have routinely used mice to replicate aspects of human breast cancer in an effort to find a cure to the most common type of cancer among women. But how effective are these preclinical models in actually mimicking the disease and giving scientists the ability to develop real comparisons?

    Eran Andrechek, a physiology professor in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State Univ., has discovered that many of the various models used in breast cancer research can replicate several characteristics of the human disease, especially at the gene level.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/mice-can-mimic-human-breast-cancer-gene-level

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  17. Researchers Study Obesity’s Link to Diabetes, Cancer

    New findings about the biological links between obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes may also shed light on the connection between obesity and cancer, says a scientist at The Univ. of Texas at Dallas. In a study published in Cell, UT Dallas’ Jung-whan (Jay) Kim and colleagues at UC San Diego found that a protein called HIF-1 alpha plays a key role in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in obese mice.

    The researchers genetically engineered mice to lack the HIF-1 alpha protein within the animals’ fat cells, or adipocytes. The animals still made HIF-1 alpha in other types of cells and tissues in their bodies. Although the mice became obese when fed a high-fat diet, they did not develop insulin resistance and diabetes to near the extent that genetically normal, obese mice did.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/researchers-study-obesitys-link-diabetes-cancer

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  19. 'Liquid Biopsy' Tracks CancerScientists have shown how a lung cancer patient’s blood sample could be used to monitor and predict their response to treatment – paving the way for personalized medicine for the disease.The recent study, published in the journal Nature Medicine, also offers a method to test new therapies in the lab and to better understand how tumors become resistant to drugs.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/liquid-biopsy-tracks-cancer

    'Liquid Biopsy' Tracks Cancer

    Scientists have shown how a lung cancer patient’s blood sample could be used to monitor and predict their response to treatment – paving the way for personalized medicine for the disease.

    The recent study, published in the journal Nature Medicine, also offers a method to test new therapies in the lab and to better understand how tumors become resistant to drugs.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/liquid-biopsy-tracks-cancer

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  21. Immune Therapy Fights Cervical Cancer

    Doctors are reporting their first success using immune therapy against cervical cancer, a disease caused by the virus HPV.

    In a pilot study at the National Cancer Institute, the tumors of two out of nine women completely disappeared and those women have stayed cancer-free for more than a year so far.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/immune-therapy-fights-cervical-cancer

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  23. Drug Protects Cancer Patients’ FertilityDoctors may have found a way to help young breast cancer patients avoid infertility caused by chemotherapy. Being given a drug to shut down the ovaries temporarily seems to boost the odds they will work after treatment ends, and it might even improve survival, a study found."They’re really exciting findings" that could help thousands of women each year in the U.S. alone, says the study’s leader, Halle Moore of the Cleveland Clinic.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/drug-protects-cancer-patients-fertility

    Drug Protects Cancer Patients’ Fertility

    Doctors may have found a way to help young breast cancer patients avoid infertility caused by chemotherapy. Being given a drug to shut down the ovaries temporarily seems to boost the odds they will work after treatment ends, and it might even improve survival, a study found.

    "They’re really exciting findings" that could help thousands of women each year in the U.S. alone, says the study’s leader, Halle Moore of the Cleveland Clinic.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/drug-protects-cancer-patients-fertility

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  25. Five Blistering Sunburns May Up Melanoma Risk by 80 PercentThe risk of developing the most deadly form of skin cancer, melanoma, is more closely related to sun exposure in early life than in adulthood in young Caucasian women, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.“Our results suggest that sun exposures in both early life and adulthood were predictive of non-melanoma skin cancers, whereas melanoma risk was predominantly associated with sun exposure in early life in a cohort of young women,” says Abrar Qureshi, professor and chair of the Department of Dermatology at Warren Alpert Medical School of the Brown Univ. and Rhode Island Hospital in Providence.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/five-blistering-sunburns-may-melanoma-risk-80-percent

    Five Blistering Sunburns May Up Melanoma Risk by 80 Percent

    The risk of developing the most deadly form of skin cancer, melanoma, is more closely related to sun exposure in early life than in adulthood in young Caucasian women, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

    “Our results suggest that sun exposures in both early life and adulthood were predictive of non-melanoma skin cancers, whereas melanoma risk was predominantly associated with sun exposure in early life in a cohort of young women,” says Abrar Qureshi, professor and chair of the Department of Dermatology at Warren Alpert Medical School of the Brown Univ. and Rhode Island Hospital in Providence.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/five-blistering-sunburns-may-melanoma-risk-80-percent

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  27. Pine Bark Substance May Treat MelanomaA substance that comes from pine bark is a potential source for a new treatment of melanoma, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.Current melanoma drugs targeting single proteins can initially be effective, but resistance develops relatively quickly and the disease recurs. In those instances, resistance usually develops when the cancer cell’s circuitry bypasses the protein that the drug acts on, or when the cell uses other pathways to avoid the point on which the drug acts.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/pine-bark-substance-may-treat-melanoma

    Pine Bark Substance May Treat Melanoma

    A substance that comes from pine bark is a potential source for a new treatment of melanoma, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

    Current melanoma drugs targeting single proteins can initially be effective, but resistance develops relatively quickly and the disease recurs. In those instances, resistance usually develops when the cancer cell’s circuitry bypasses the protein that the drug acts on, or when the cell uses other pathways to avoid the point on which the drug acts.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/pine-bark-substance-may-treat-melanoma

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  29. Strep Bacteria Can Fight Colon CancerResearchers at Univ. of Western Ontario have shown how the bacteria primarily responsible for causing strep throat can be used to fight colon cancer. By engineering a streptococcal bacterial toxin to attach itself to tumor cells, they are forcing the immune system to recognize and attack the cancer.Kelcey Patterson, a PhD Candidate at Western and the lead author on the study, showed that the engineered bacterial toxin could significantly reduce the size of human colon cancer tumors in mice, with a drastic reduction in the instances of metastasis. By using mouse models that are stripped of their immune system, they were able to create a “humanized mouse” – one that would not only grow human colon cancer cells, but would also support a human immune system, to test the anti-cancer immunotherapy.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/strep-bacteria-can-fight-colon-cancer

    Strep Bacteria Can Fight Colon Cancer

    Researchers at Univ. of Western Ontario have shown how the bacteria primarily responsible for causing strep throat can be used to fight colon cancer. By engineering a streptococcal bacterial toxin to attach itself to tumor cells, they are forcing the immune system to recognize and attack the cancer.

    Kelcey Patterson, a PhD Candidate at Western and the lead author on the study, showed that the engineered bacterial toxin could significantly reduce the size of human colon cancer tumors in mice, with a drastic reduction in the instances of metastasis. By using mouse models that are stripped of their immune system, they were able to create a “humanized mouse” – one that would not only grow human colon cancer cells, but would also support a human immune system, to test the anti-cancer immunotherapy.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/strep-bacteria-can-fight-colon-cancer

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