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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Drug Fights Cancer Reservoirs in Bone MarrowCancer drugs that recruit antibodies from the body’s own immune system to help kill tumors have shown much promise in treating several types of cancer. However, after initial success, the tumors often return.A new study from MIT reveals a way to combat these recurrent tumors with a drug that makes them more vulnerable to the antibody treatment. This drug, known as cyclophosphamide, is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat some cancers.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/drug-fights-cancer-reservoirs-bone-marrow

    Drug Fights Cancer Reservoirs in Bone Marrow

    Cancer drugs that recruit antibodies from the body’s own immune system to help kill tumors have shown much promise in treating several types of cancer. However, after initial success, the tumors often return.

    A new study from MIT reveals a way to combat these recurrent tumors with a drug that makes them more vulnerable to the antibody treatment. This drug, known as cyclophosphamide, is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat some cancers.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/01/drug-fights-cancer-reservoirs-bone-marrow

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  3. Bone Marrow Recipient Cured of Peanut AllergyNot only can bone marrow transplants be life-saving for children with acute lymphocytic leukemia, they may also cure peanut allergies. According to research presented during the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology’s (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting, a 10-year-old boy no longer had a peanut allergy after undergoing a bone marrow transplant."It has been reported that bone marrow and liver transplants can transfer peanut allergy from donor to recipient," says allergist Yong Luo, ACAAI member and lead study author. "But our research found a rare case in which a transplant seems to have cured the recipient of their allergy."Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/bone-marrow-recipient-cured-peanut-allergy

    Bone Marrow Recipient Cured of Peanut Allergy

    Not only can bone marrow transplants be life-saving for children with acute lymphocytic leukemia, they may also cure peanut allergies. According to research presented during the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology’s (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting, a 10-year-old boy no longer had a peanut allergy after undergoing a bone marrow transplant.

    "It has been reported that bone marrow and liver transplants can transfer peanut allergy from donor to recipient," says allergist Yong Luo, ACAAI member and lead study author. "But our research found a rare case in which a transplant seems to have cured the recipient of their allergy."

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/bone-marrow-recipient-cured-peanut-allergy

  4. 29 Notes
  5. Men Show No Sign of HIV After Marrow TransplantTwo HIV-positive patients in the U.S. who underwent bone marrow transplants for cancer have stopped anti-retroviral therapy and still show no detectable sign of the HIV virus, researchers said today.The Harvard Univ. researchers stressed it was too early to say the men have been cured, but said it was an encouraging sign that the virus hasn’t rebounded in their blood months after drug treatment ended.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/men-show-no-sign-hiv-after-marrow-transplant

    Men Show No Sign of HIV After Marrow Transplant

    Two HIV-positive patients in the U.S. who underwent bone marrow transplants for cancer have stopped anti-retroviral therapy and still show no detectable sign of the HIV virus, researchers said today.

    The Harvard Univ. researchers stressed it was too early to say the men have been cured, but said it was an encouraging sign that the virus hasn’t rebounded in their blood months after drug treatment ended.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/men-show-no-sign-hiv-after-marrow-transplant

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  7. Drug Cuts Deadly Transplant Risk in Half

    A new class of drugs reduced the risk of patients contracting a serious and often deadly side effect of lifesaving bone marrow transplant treatments, according to a study from researchers at the Univ. of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    The study, the first to test this treatment in people, combined the drug vorinostat with standard medications given after transplant, resulting in 21 percent of patients developing graft-vs.-host disease compared to 42 percent of patients who typically develop this condition with standard medications alone.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/12/drug-cuts-deadly-transplant-risk-half

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  9. Bone Marrow to Fight Lou Gehrig’s DiseaseThe ability to produce neuroprotectors, proteins that protect the human brain against neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and ALS, is the holy grail of brain research. A technology developed at Tel Aviv Univ. does just that, and it’s now out of the lab and in hospitals to begin clinical trials with patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Bone-Marrow-to-Fight-Lou-Gehrigs-Disease-092111.aspx

    Bone Marrow to Fight Lou Gehrig’s Disease

    The ability to produce neuroprotectors, proteins that protect the human brain against neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and ALS, is the holy grail of brain research. A technology developed at Tel Aviv Univ. does just that, and it’s now out of the lab and in hospitals to begin clinical trials with patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Bone-Marrow-to-Fight-Lou-Gehrigs-Disease-092111.aspx

  10. 7 Notes