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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Crib Mattresses Emit Potentially Harmful ChemicalsIn a first-of-its-kind study, a team of environmental engineers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The Univ. of Texas at Austin found that infants are exposed to high levels of chemical emissions from crib mattresses while they sleep.Analyzing the foam padding in crib mattresses, the team found that the mattresses release significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), potentially harmful chemicals also found in household items such as cleaners and scented sprays.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/crib-mattresses-emit-potentially-harmful-chemicals

    Crib Mattresses Emit Potentially Harmful Chemicals

    In a first-of-its-kind study, a team of environmental engineers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The Univ. of Texas at Austin found that infants are exposed to high levels of chemical emissions from crib mattresses while they sleep.

    Analyzing the foam padding in crib mattresses, the team found that the mattresses release significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), potentially harmful chemicals also found in household items such as cleaners and scented sprays.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/crib-mattresses-emit-potentially-harmful-chemicals

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  3. Second HIV-positive Baby May Be CuredA second baby born with the AIDS virus may have had her infection put into remission and possibly cured by very early treatment — in this instance, four hours after birth.Doctors revealed the case at an AIDS conference in Boston. The girl was born in suburban Los Angeles last April, a month after researchers announced the first case from Mississippi. That was a medical first that led doctors worldwide to rethink how fast and hard to treat infants born with HIV, and the California doctors followed that example.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/second-hiv-positive-baby-may-be-cured

    Second HIV-positive Baby May Be Cured

    A second baby born with the AIDS virus may have had her infection put into remission and possibly cured by very early treatment — in this instance, four hours after birth.

    Doctors revealed the case at an AIDS conference in Boston. The girl was born in suburban Los Angeles last April, a month after researchers announced the first case from Mississippi. That was a medical first that led doctors worldwide to rethink how fast and hard to treat infants born with HIV, and the California doctors followed that example.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/second-hiv-positive-baby-may-be-cured

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  5. Large Study Shows Smoking Harms FetusesTobacco smoke contains thousands of compounds, many of them toxic and capable of causing injury throughout the body. Because of this high toxicity of tobacco smoke, many diseases have long been causally linked to tobacco smoking – both to active smoking and to passive exposure of non-smokers who inhale the mixture of exhaled smoke and smoke given off by the smoldering cigarette, generally referred to as secondhand smoke or SHS.The journal Tobacco Control recently published findings on smoking and pregnancy outcomes from a very large U.S. study, the Women’s Health Initiative. The authors assessed whether active smoking by the mother while pregnant and exposure of non-smoking mothers to SHS led to an increased risk of spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and tubal ectopic pregnancy (that is, implantation of the fertilized egg into the fallopian tube, rather than the uterus). Overall, the study found that both active smoking and SHS exposure increased all of these risks for pregnancy.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/large-study-shows-smoking-harms-fetuses

    Large Study Shows Smoking Harms Fetuses

    Tobacco smoke contains thousands of compounds, many of them toxic and capable of causing injury throughout the body. Because of this high toxicity of tobacco smoke, many diseases have long been causally linked to tobacco smoking – both to active smoking and to passive exposure of non-smokers who inhale the mixture of exhaled smoke and smoke given off by the smoldering cigarette, generally referred to as secondhand smoke or SHS.

    The journal Tobacco Control recently published findings on smoking and pregnancy outcomes from a very large U.S. study, the Women’s Health Initiative. The authors assessed whether active smoking by the mother while pregnant and exposure of non-smoking mothers to SHS led to an increased risk of spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and tubal ectopic pregnancy (that is, implantation of the fertilized egg into the fallopian tube, rather than the uterus). Overall, the study found that both active smoking and SHS exposure increased all of these risks for pregnancy.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/large-study-shows-smoking-harms-fetuses

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  7. Ancient Baby DNA Sheds Light on Native AmericansThe DNA of a baby boy who was buried in Montana more than 12,000 years ago has been recovered, and it provides new indications of the ancient roots of today’s Native American and other native peoples of the Americas.The boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America from about 13,000 years ago to about 12,600 years ago.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/ancient-baby-dna-sheds-light-native-americans

    Ancient Baby DNA Sheds Light on Native Americans

    The DNA of a baby boy who was buried in Montana more than 12,000 years ago has been recovered, and it provides new indications of the ancient roots of today’s Native American and other native peoples of the Americas.

    The boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America from about 13,000 years ago to about 12,600 years ago.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/ancient-baby-dna-sheds-light-native-americans

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  9. Exercise During Pregnancy May Aid Newborn Brain DevelopmentAs little as 20 minutes of moderate exercise three times per week during pregnancy enhances the newborn child’s brain development, according to researchers at the Univ. of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children’s hospital. This head-start could have an impact on the child’s entire life.“Our research indicates that exercise during pregnancy enhances the newborn child’s brain development,” explains Prof. Dave Ellemberg, who led the study. “While animal studies have shown similar results, this is the first randomized controlled trial in humans to objectively measure the impact of exercise during pregnancy directly on the newborn’s brain. We hope these results will guide public health interventions and research on brain plasticity. Most of all, we are optimistic that this will encourage women to change their health habits, given that the simple act of exercising during pregnancy could make a difference for their child’s future.” Ellemberg and his colleagues Prof. Daniel Curnier and PhD candidate Élise Labonté-LeMoyne presented their findings at Neuroscience 2013 in San Diego.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/exercise-during-pregnancy-may-aid-newborn-brain-development

    Exercise During Pregnancy May Aid Newborn Brain Development

    As little as 20 minutes of moderate exercise three times per week during pregnancy enhances the newborn child’s brain development, according to researchers at the Univ. of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children’s hospital. This head-start could have an impact on the child’s entire life.

    “Our research indicates that exercise during pregnancy enhances the newborn child’s brain development,” explains Prof. Dave Ellemberg, who led the study. “While animal studies have shown similar results, this is the first randomized controlled trial in humans to objectively measure the impact of exercise during pregnancy directly on the newborn’s brain. We hope these results will guide public health interventions and research on brain plasticity. Most of all, we are optimistic that this will encourage women to change their health habits, given that the simple act of exercising during pregnancy could make a difference for their child’s future.” Ellemberg and his colleagues Prof. Daniel Curnier and PhD candidate Élise Labonté-LeMoyne presented their findings at Neuroscience 2013 in San Diego.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/exercise-during-pregnancy-may-aid-newborn-brain-development

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  11. Docs Redefine Full-Term PregnancyMom-to-be closing in on her due date? The nation’s obstetricians are getting more precise about exactly how close makes for a full-term pregnancy.On average, a pregnancy lasts 40 weeks, counting from the first day of the woman’s last menstrual period. That’s how a due date is estimated. A baby is considered preterm if he or she is born before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Until now, a “term” baby was defined as one born anytime from 37 weeks to 42 weeks, a few weeks before or after the calculated due date.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/docs-redefine-full-term-pregnancy

    Docs Redefine Full-Term Pregnancy

    Mom-to-be closing in on her due date? The nation’s obstetricians are getting more precise about exactly how close makes for a full-term pregnancy.

    On average, a pregnancy lasts 40 weeks, counting from the first day of the woman’s last menstrual period. That’s how a due date is estimated. A baby is considered preterm if he or she is born before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Until now, a “term” baby was defined as one born anytime from 37 weeks to 42 weeks, a few weeks before or after the calculated due date.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/docs-redefine-full-term-pregnancy

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  13. Bacteria Found in Sold Breast MilkHuman breast milk is sold for babies on several online sites for a few dollars an ounce, but a new study says buyer beware: testing showed it can contain potentially dangerous bacteria including salmonella.The warning comes from researchers who bought and tested 101 breast milk samples sold by women on one popular site. Three-fourths of the samples contained high amounts of bacteria that could potentially sicken babies, the researchers found. They did not identify the website.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/bacteria-found-sold-breast-milk

    Bacteria Found in Sold Breast Milk

    Human breast milk is sold for babies on several online sites for a few dollars an ounce, but a new study says buyer beware: testing showed it can contain potentially dangerous bacteria including salmonella.

    The warning comes from researchers who bought and tested 101 breast milk samples sold by women on one popular site. Three-fourths of the samples contained high amounts of bacteria that could potentially sicken babies, the researchers found. They did not identify the website.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/10/bacteria-found-sold-breast-milk

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  15. Mother’s Fish Consumption Not Linked to AutismThe potential impact of exposure to low levels of mercury on the developing brain – specifically by women consuming fish during pregnancy – has long been the source of concern and some have argued that the chemical may be responsible for behavioral disorders such as autism. However, a new study that draws upon more than 30 years of research in the Republic of Seychelles reports that there is no association between pre-natal mercury exposure and autism-like behaviors.“This study shows no evidence of a correlation between low level mercury exposure and autism spectrum-like behaviors among children whose mothers ate, on average, up to 12 meals of fish each week during pregnancy,” said Edwin van Wijngaarden, an associate professor in the Univ. of Rochester Medical Center’s (URMC) Department of Public Health Sciences and lead author of the study which appears online in the journal Epidemiology. “These findings contribute to the growing body of literature that suggest that exposure to the chemical does not play an important role in the onset of these behaviors.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/mother%E2%80%99s-fish-consumption-not-linked-autism

    Mother’s Fish Consumption Not Linked to Autism

    The potential impact of exposure to low levels of mercury on the developing brain – specifically by women consuming fish during pregnancy – has long been the source of concern and some have argued that the chemical may be responsible for behavioral disorders such as autism. However, a new study that draws upon more than 30 years of research in the Republic of Seychelles reports that there is no association between pre-natal mercury exposure and autism-like behaviors.

    “This study shows no evidence of a correlation between low level mercury exposure and autism spectrum-like behaviors among children whose mothers ate, on average, up to 12 meals of fish each week during pregnancy,” said Edwin van Wijngaarden, an associate professor in the Univ. of Rochester Medical Center’s (URMC) Department of Public Health Sciences and lead author of the study which appears online in the journal Epidemiology. “These findings contribute to the growing body of literature that suggest that exposure to the chemical does not play an important role in the onset of these behaviors.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/mother%E2%80%99s-fish-consumption-not-linked-autism

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  17. Infants’ First Food Linked to Diabetes RiskInfants who get their first solid food before four months of age and after six months may have a higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes, Univ. of Colorado Denver researchers have found.The researchers, from the Colorado School of Public Health and the CU School of Medicine’s Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, also found that the risk goes down if the mother is still breast-feeding the baby when solid foods, particularly those containing wheat or barley, are introduced into the diet.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/infants%E2%80%99-first-food-linked-diabetes-risk

    Infants’ First Food Linked to Diabetes Risk

    Infants who get their first solid food before four months of age and after six months may have a higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes, Univ. of Colorado Denver researchers have found.

    The researchers, from the Colorado School of Public Health and the CU School of Medicine’s Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, also found that the risk goes down if the mother is still breast-feeding the baby when solid foods, particularly those containing wheat or barley, are introduced into the diet.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/infants%E2%80%99-first-food-linked-diabetes-risk

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  19. IVF Linked to Small Increased Risk of Mental Retardation

    In a study that included more than 2.5 million children born in Sweden, in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment was not associated with a higher risk of autistic disorder when compared to spontaneous conception, but was associated with a small but statistically significant increased risk of mental retardation, according to a study in today’s issue of the American Medical Association’s JAMA. The authors note that the prevalence of these disorders was low, and the increase in absolute risk associated with IVF was small.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/07/ivf-linked-small-increased-risk-mental-retardation

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  21. Exposure to Pollution During Pregnancy May Increase Child’s Autism RiskWomen in the U.S. exposed to high levels of air pollution while pregnant were up to twice as likely to have a child with autism as women who lived in areas with low pollution, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the first large national study to examine links between autism and air pollution across the U.S.“Our findings raise concerns since, depending on the pollutant, 20 percent to 60 percent of the women in our study lived in areas where risk of autism was elevated,” says lead author Andrea Roberts, research associate in the HSPH Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/exposure-pollution-during-pregnancy-may-increase-childs-autism-risk

    Exposure to Pollution During Pregnancy May Increase Child’s Autism Risk

    Women in the U.S. exposed to high levels of air pollution while pregnant were up to twice as likely to have a child with autism as women who lived in areas with low pollution, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the first large national study to examine links between autism and air pollution across the U.S.

    “Our findings raise concerns since, depending on the pollutant, 20 percent to 60 percent of the women in our study lived in areas where risk of autism was elevated,” says lead author Andrea Roberts, research associate in the HSPH Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/exposure-pollution-during-pregnancy-may-increase-childs-autism-risk

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  23. Formula-Feeding Linked to Higher Risk of DiseaseNew evidence from research suggests that infants fed formula, rather than breast milk, experience metabolic stress that could play a part in the long-recognized link between formula-feeding and an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes and other conditions in adult life. The study appears in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/formula-feeding-linked-higher-risk-disease

    Formula-Feeding Linked to Higher Risk of Disease

    New evidence from research suggests that infants fed formula, rather than breast milk, experience metabolic stress that could play a part in the long-recognized link between formula-feeding and an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes and other conditions in adult life. The study appears in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/formula-feeding-linked-higher-risk-disease

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  25. Losing Weight Between Babies is BestThe time between pregnancies is a golden window for obese women to lose weight, a Saint Louis Univ. study finds.The research, led by Arun Jain, visiting scholar in SLU’s department of obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health, also found that obese women should be counseled not to gain excessive weight during pregnancy.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/losing-weight-between-babies-best

    Losing Weight Between Babies is Best

    The time between pregnancies is a golden window for obese women to lose weight, a Saint Louis Univ. study finds.

    The research, led by Arun Jain, visiting scholar in SLU’s department of obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health, also found that obese women should be counseled not to gain excessive weight during pregnancy.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/06/losing-weight-between-babies-best

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  27. Babies Born After Weight Loss Surgery Are Healthier

    Obese mothers tend to have kids who become obese. Now provocative research suggests weight-loss surgery may help break that unhealthy cycle in an unexpected way — by affecting how their children’s genes behave.

    In a first-of-a-kind study, Canadian researchers tested children born to obese women, plus their brothers and sisters who were conceived after the mother had obesity surgery. Youngsters born after mom lost lots of weight were slimmer than their siblings. They also had fewer risk factors for diabetes or heart disease later in life.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/babies-born-after-weight-loss-surgery-are-healthier

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  29. First Printed Airway Saves Little Boy’s LifeIn a medical first, doctors used plastic particles and a 3D laser printer to create an airway splint to save the life of a baby boy who used to stop breathing nearly every day. It’s the latest advance from the booming field of regenerative medicine, making body parts in the lab.In the case of Kaiba Gionfriddo, doctors didn’t have a moment to spare. Because of a birth defect, the little Ohio boy’s airway kept collapsing, causing his breathing to stop and often his heart, too. Doctors in Michigan had been researching artificial airway splints but had not implanted one in a patient yet.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/first-printed-airway-saves-little-boys-life

    First Printed Airway Saves Little Boy’s Life

    In a medical first, doctors used plastic particles and a 3D laser printer to create an airway splint to save the life of a baby boy who used to stop breathing nearly every day. It’s the latest advance from the booming field of regenerative medicine, making body parts in the lab.

    In the case of Kaiba Gionfriddo, doctors didn’t have a moment to spare. Because of a birth defect, the little Ohio boy’s airway kept collapsing, causing his breathing to stop and often his heart, too. Doctors in Michigan had been researching artificial airway splints but had not implanted one in a patient yet.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/05/first-printed-airway-saves-little-boys-life

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