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  1. Breastfeeding May Lower Risk of Postnatal DepressionA new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.The study, by researchers in the UK and Spain, and published in the journal Maternal and Child Health, shows that mothers who planned to breastfeed and who actually went on to breastfeed were around 50 percent less likely to become depressed than mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed. Mothers who planned to breastfeed, but who did not go on to breastfeed, were over twice as likely to become depressed as mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/breastfeeding-may-lower-risk-postnatal-depression

    Breastfeeding May Lower Risk of Postnatal Depression

    A new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.

    The study, by researchers in the UK and Spain, and published in the journal Maternal and Child Health, shows that mothers who planned to breastfeed and who actually went on to breastfeed were around 50 percent less likely to become depressed than mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed. Mothers who planned to breastfeed, but who did not go on to breastfeed, were over twice as likely to become depressed as mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/breastfeeding-may-lower-risk-postnatal-depression

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  3. Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Reduced IVF Success

    Women with a vitamin D deficiency were nearly half as likely to conceive through in vitro fertilization (IVF) as women who had sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

    Long known for its role in bone health, vitamin D is a steroid hormone that is emerging as a factor in fertility. Animal studies have shown that the hormone, which is produced in the skin as a result of sun exposure as well as absorbed from some fortified foods, affects fertility in many mammals.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/vitamin-d-deficiency-linked-reduced-ivf-success

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  5. Cars Detoured to Protect Toads from CroakingIt’s rush hour in Philadelphia for thousands of baby toads as they hop across a busy residential street on a rainy summer night.Why do toadlets cross the road? To get to the woods on the other side — where they will live, eat mosquitoes and grow up to be full-sized American toads, bufo Americanus. After a couple of years, they’ll make the reverse trek as adults — unless they get squashed by a car.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/cars-detoured-protect-toads-croaking

    Cars Detoured to Protect Toads from Croaking

    It’s rush hour in Philadelphia for thousands of baby toads as they hop across a busy residential street on a rainy summer night.

    Why do toadlets cross the road? To get to the woods on the other side — where they will live, eat mosquitoes and grow up to be full-sized American toads, bufo Americanus. After a couple of years, they’ll make the reverse trek as adults — unless they get squashed by a car.


    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/cars-detoured-protect-toads-croaking

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  7. Dirty Houses Linked to Lower Allergy, Asthma Risks

    Infants exposed to rodent and pet dander, roach allergens and a wide variety of household bacteria in the first year of life appear less likely to suffer from allergies, wheezing and asthma, according to results of a study conducted by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and other institutions.

    Previous research has shown that children who grow up on farms have lower allergy and asthma rates, a phenomenon attributed to their regular exposure to microorganisms present in farm soil. Other studies, however, have found increased asthma risk among inner-city dwellers exposed to high levels of roach and mouse allergens and pollutants. The new study confirms that children who live in such homes do have higher overall allergy and asthma rates but adds a surprising twist: those who encounter such substances before their first birthdays seem to benefit rather than suffer from them. Importantly, the protective effects of both allergen and bacterial exposure were not seen if a child’s first encounter with these substances occurred after age one, the research found.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/dirty-houses-linked-lower-allergy-asthma-risks

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  9. Wireless Radiation Linked to Risks to Brain Development

    An international group of doctors and scientific experts is joining with non-profit organizations today to urge pregnant women to limit their exposure to wireless radiation from cellphones and other devices by taking simple steps to protect themselves and their unborn children. The national public awareness campaign, called the BabySafe Project, is being coordinated by Grassroots Environmental Education and Environmental Health Trust, and is based on independent scientific research linking exposure to wireless radiation from cellphones during pregnancy to neurological and behavioral problems in offspring that resemble Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/06/wireless-radiation-linked-risks-brain-development

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  11.  Placenta is Key to Why Female Babies Survive More Often Sexual inequality between boys and girls starts as early as in the mother’s womb – but how and why this occurs could be a key to preventing higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal death among boys.A team from the Univ. of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute has been studying the underlying genetic and developmental reasons why male babies generally have worse outcomes than females, with significantly increased rates of pregnancy complications and poor health outcomes for males.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/placenta-key-why-girls-babies-survive-more-often

    Placenta is Key to Why Female Babies Survive More Often

    Sexual inequality between boys and girls starts as early as in the mother’s womb – but how and why this occurs could be a key to preventing higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal death among boys.

    A team from the Univ. of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute has been studying the underlying genetic and developmental reasons why male babies generally have worse outcomes than females, with significantly increased rates of pregnancy complications and poor health outcomes for males.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/placenta-key-why-girls-babies-survive-more-often

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  13. Even Healthy Placentas Gave BacteriaSurprising new research shows a small but diverse community of bacteria lives in the placentas of healthy pregnant women, overturning the belief that fetuses grow in a pretty sterile environment.These are mostly varieties of “good germs” that live in everybody. But this week’s study also hints that the make-up of this microbial colony plays a role in premature birth.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/even-healthy-placentas-gave-bacteria

    Even Healthy Placentas Gave Bacteria

    Surprising new research shows a small but diverse community of bacteria lives in the placentas of healthy pregnant women, overturning the belief that fetuses grow in a pretty sterile environment.

    These are mostly varieties of “good germs” that live in everybody. But this week’s study also hints that the make-up of this microbial colony plays a role in premature birth.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/even-healthy-placentas-gave-bacteria

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  15. Pregnant Women Have Greater Response to MusicMusic can be soothing or stirring, it can make us dance or make us sad. Blood pressure, heartbeat, respiration and even body temperature – music affects the body in a variety of ways. It triggers especially powerful physical reactions in pregnant women. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have discovered that pregnant women compared to their non-pregnant counterparts rate music as more intensely pleasant and unpleasant, and found that listening to music while pregnant was associated with greater changes in blood pressure. Music appears to have an especially strong influence on pregnant women, a fact that may relate to a prenatal conditioning of the fetus to music.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/pregnant-women-have-greater-response-music

    Pregnant Women Have Greater Response to Music

    Music can be soothing or stirring, it can make us dance or make us sad. Blood pressure, heartbeat, respiration and even body temperature – music affects the body in a variety of ways. It triggers especially powerful physical reactions in pregnant women. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have discovered that pregnant women compared to their non-pregnant counterparts rate music as more intensely pleasant and unpleasant, and found that listening to music while pregnant was associated with greater changes in blood pressure. Music appears to have an especially strong influence on pregnant women, a fact that may relate to a prenatal conditioning of the fetus to music.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/pregnant-women-have-greater-response-music

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  17. Neurons Regulate Mom and Dad’s Behavior in Mice

    In a study in mice, Harvard Univ.’s Catherine Dulac has pinpointed galanin neurons in the brain’s medial preoptic area (MPOA), that appear to regulate parental behavior. If similar neurons are at work in humans, it could offer clues to the treatment of conditions like post-partum depression. The study is described in Nature.

    "If you look across different animal species, there are some species in which the father contributes to caring for the young – sometimes the work is divided equally, sometimes the father does most of the work – and there are species in which the father does nothing," Dulac says. "The essential question is where is that variability coming from? We may be tempted to say that the mom has the neurons required to engage in parental behavior, and dads don’t – this paper shows that’s wrong."

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/neurons-regulate-mom-and-dads-behavior-mice

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  19. Longer Caffeine Exposure is Even More Helpful to PreemiesThe caffeine in coffee that might help get you going in the morning can be lifesaving for premature babies. For more than a decade, neonatologists have routinely given premature newborns caffeine as a respiratory stimulant, helping their immature lungs and brains remember to breathe and reducing episodes of intermittent hypoxia (IH) — short, repetitive drops in blood oxygen levels.Typically, babies are weaned off caffeine once they’re developmentally mature enough to breathe normally without help, usually around 34 weeks’ gestational age.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/longer-caffeine-exposure-even-more-helpful-preemies

    Longer Caffeine Exposure is Even More Helpful to Preemies

    The caffeine in coffee that might help get you going in the morning can be lifesaving for premature babies. For more than a decade, neonatologists have routinely given premature newborns caffeine as a respiratory stimulant, helping their immature lungs and brains remember to breathe and reducing episodes of intermittent hypoxia (IH) — short, repetitive drops in blood oxygen levels.

    Typically, babies are weaned off caffeine once they’re developmentally mature enough to breathe normally without help, usually around 34 weeks’ gestational age.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/longer-caffeine-exposure-even-more-helpful-preemies

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  21. Hospital Access Quickly Lowers Infant Mortality RateFew problems in developing countries are as gut-wrenching as high infant mortality — and yet it is a problem that has solutions. A policy change in Thailand’s health care system has quickly led to significantly lower infant mortality rates among less-wealthy citizens, as a study co-authored by MIT economists shows.“It’s a very dramatic shift,” says Robert Townsend, the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at MIT, and a co-author of a new paper outlining the findings. The study was conducted along with Jon Gruber, an MIT professor of economics and health care expert, and Nathaniel Hendren, an economist at Harvard Univ.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/hospital-access-quickly-lowers-infant-mortality-rate

    Hospital Access Quickly Lowers Infant Mortality Rate

    Few problems in developing countries are as gut-wrenching as high infant mortality — and yet it is a problem that has solutions. A policy change in Thailand’s health care system has quickly led to significantly lower infant mortality rates among less-wealthy citizens, as a study co-authored by MIT economists shows.

    “It’s a very dramatic shift,” says Robert Townsend, the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at MIT, and a co-author of a new paper outlining the findings. The study was conducted along with Jon Gruber, an MIT professor of economics and health care expert, and Nathaniel Hendren, an economist at Harvard Univ.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/hospital-access-quickly-lowers-infant-mortality-rate

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  23. Mom’s Diet Impacts Child’s DNAA mother’s diet before conception can permanently affect how her child’s genes function, according to a study published in Nature Communications. The first such evidence of the effect in humans opens up the possibility that a mother’s diet before pregnancy could permanently affect many aspects of her children’s lifelong health.Researchers from the MRC International Nutrition Group, based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and MRC Unit, The Gambia, utilized a unique, “experiment of nature,” in rural Gambia, where the population’s dependence on own grown foods and a markedly seasonal climate impose a large difference in people’s dietary patterns between rainy and dry seasons.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/moms-diet-impacts-childs-dna

    Mom’s Diet Impacts Child’s DNA

    A mother’s diet before conception can permanently affect how her child’s genes function, according to a study published in Nature Communications. The first such evidence of the effect in humans opens up the possibility that a mother’s diet before pregnancy could permanently affect many aspects of her children’s lifelong health.

    Researchers from the MRC International Nutrition Group, based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and MRC Unit, The Gambia, utilized a unique, “experiment of nature,” in rural Gambia, where the population’s dependence on own grown foods and a markedly seasonal climate impose a large difference in people’s dietary patterns between rainy and dry seasons.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/moms-diet-impacts-childs-dna

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  25. Animal Study Improves Immunity in Preemies
 Mothers give a newborn baby a gift of germs — germs that help to kick-start the infant’s immune system. But antibiotics, used to fend off infection, may paradoxically interrupt a newborn’s own immune responses, leaving already-vulnerable premature babies more susceptible to dangerous pathogens.A new animal study, by neonatology researchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), sheds light on immunology in newborns by revealing how gut microbes play a crucial role in fostering the rapid production of infection-fighting white blood cells, called granulocytes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/animal-study-sheds-light-improving-immunity-preemies

    Animal Study Improves Immunity in Preemies


    Mothers give a newborn baby a gift of germs — germs that help to kick-start the infant’s immune system. But antibiotics, used to fend off infection, may paradoxically interrupt a newborn’s own immune responses, leaving already-vulnerable premature babies more susceptible to dangerous pathogens.

    A new animal study, by neonatology researchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), sheds light on immunology in newborns by revealing how gut microbes play a crucial role in fostering the rapid production of infection-fighting white blood cells, called granulocytes.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/animal-study-sheds-light-improving-immunity-preemies

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  27. Crib Mattresses Emit Potentially Harmful ChemicalsIn a first-of-its-kind study, a team of environmental engineers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The Univ. of Texas at Austin found that infants are exposed to high levels of chemical emissions from crib mattresses while they sleep.Analyzing the foam padding in crib mattresses, the team found that the mattresses release significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), potentially harmful chemicals also found in household items such as cleaners and scented sprays.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/crib-mattresses-emit-potentially-harmful-chemicals

    Crib Mattresses Emit Potentially Harmful Chemicals

    In a first-of-its-kind study, a team of environmental engineers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The Univ. of Texas at Austin found that infants are exposed to high levels of chemical emissions from crib mattresses while they sleep.

    Analyzing the foam padding in crib mattresses, the team found that the mattresses release significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), potentially harmful chemicals also found in household items such as cleaners and scented sprays.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/crib-mattresses-emit-potentially-harmful-chemicals

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  29. Second HIV-positive Baby May Be CuredA second baby born with the AIDS virus may have had her infection put into remission and possibly cured by very early treatment — in this instance, four hours after birth.Doctors revealed the case at an AIDS conference in Boston. The girl was born in suburban Los Angeles last April, a month after researchers announced the first case from Mississippi. That was a medical first that led doctors worldwide to rethink how fast and hard to treat infants born with HIV, and the California doctors followed that example.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/second-hiv-positive-baby-may-be-cured

    Second HIV-positive Baby May Be Cured

    A second baby born with the AIDS virus may have had her infection put into remission and possibly cured by very early treatment — in this instance, four hours after birth.

    Doctors revealed the case at an AIDS conference in Boston. The girl was born in suburban Los Angeles last April, a month after researchers announced the first case from Mississippi. That was a medical first that led doctors worldwide to rethink how fast and hard to treat infants born with HIV, and the California doctors followed that example.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/second-hiv-positive-baby-may-be-cured

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