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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Innovative, Automated and Simpler Sample PrepResearchers want more of everything in the multitude of lab systems they employ for sample prep—throughput, ease-of-use, accuracy and speed are just a few.Sample preparation continues to be the largest bottleneck in the modern research lab. Most sample prep operations are still non-automated and require a substantial number of personnel for labor-intensive and time-consuming operations leading up to analytical measurements. As a result, equipment and instrumentation developers are dedicating a large portion of their new product development work to improving the systems used in these processes. This is important because sample prep is used by more researchers than any other process, as well as being the process with the widest range of utilized equipment.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/06/innovative-automated-and-simpler-sample-prep

    Innovative, Automated and Simpler Sample Prep

    Researchers want more of everything in the multitude of lab systems they employ for sample prep—throughput, ease-of-use, accuracy and speed are just a few.

    Sample preparation continues to be the largest bottleneck in the modern research lab. Most sample prep operations are still non-automated and require a substantial number of personnel for labor-intensive and time-consuming operations leading up to analytical measurements. As a result, equipment and instrumentation developers are dedicating a large portion of their new product development work to improving the systems used in these processes. This is important because sample prep is used by more researchers than any other process, as well as being the process with the widest range of utilized equipment.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/06/innovative-automated-and-simpler-sample-prep

  2. 35 Notes
  3. A Plastic WorldA quote that has stuck with me for a long time is the one where a business partner (Mr. McGuire) of Benjamin Braddock’s father in the movie “The Graduate” advises Ben (played by Dustin Hoffman) at his graduation party that he, “just wants to say one word to you…..[and that word is] plastics.” Plastics in 1967, when this movie was made, was at the beginning of a substantial growth curve, and Mr. McGuire thought it had a great future.Read more:

    A Plastic World

    A quote that has stuck with me for a long time is the one where a business partner (Mr. McGuire) of Benjamin Braddock’s father in the movie “The Graduate” advises Ben (played by Dustin Hoffman) at his graduation party that he, “just wants to say one word to you…..[and that word is] plastics.” Plastics in 1967, when this movie was made, was at the beginning of a substantial growth curve, and Mr. McGuire thought it had a great future.

    Read more:

  4. 5 Notes
  5. Scientist of the Week: Daniele LantagneEvery Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Daniele Lantagne, from Tufts Univ. With a team, she found that the EPA’s recommendations for treating water after a natural disaster or other emergencies call for more chlorine bleach than is necessary to kill disease-causing pathogens, and are often impractical to carry out.The original article is here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/epa-recommends-too-much-bleach-water-purificationShe speaks about her work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/scientist-week-daniele-lantagneHave a question for Daniele Lantagne? Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

    Scientist of the Week: Daniele Lantagne

    Every Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Daniele Lantagne, from Tufts Univ. With a team, she found that the EPA’s recommendations for treating water after a natural disaster or other emergencies call for more chlorine bleach than is necessary to kill disease-causing pathogens, and are often impractical to carry out.

    The original article is here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/epa-recommends-too-much-bleach-water-purification

    She speaks about her work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/06/scientist-week-daniele-lantagne

    Have a question for Daniele Lantagne? Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

  6. 15 Notes
  7. Guest Blog: Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Food Won’t Kill YouRecently Mother Jones published an article on the dangers of food laced with tiny metal oxide particles. The article, however, is laced with errors and misinformation.The source material for the article came from a report by the environmental organization Friends of the Earth, an online database of nanotechnology-based consumer products and a peer-reviewed paper published in 2012. But, the analysis of the information is flawed.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2014/06/guest-blog-metal-oxide-nanoparticles-food-wont-kill-you

    Guest Blog: Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Food Won’t Kill You

    Recently Mother Jones published an article on the dangers of food laced with tiny metal oxide particles. The article, however, is laced with errors and misinformation.

    The source material for the article came from a report by the environmental organization Friends of the Earth, an online database of nanotechnology-based consumer products and a peer-reviewed paper published in 2012. But, the analysis of the information is flawed.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2014/06/guest-blog-metal-oxide-nanoparticles-food-wont-kill-you

  8. 27 Notes
  9. BeginningsResearch is all about new beginnings. Over the past century, relatively small groups of scientists who were in the right place at the right time and with particular knowledge sets and business acumen have advanced the state of science and technology (S&T). In the early 1900s, the Edisons, Fords and Wrights created the foundations for modern transport and production technologies. Fifty years ago, it was the Watsons, Hewletts and Packards who created similar foundations for modern computing machines. Twenty-five years ago, the Mullis’, Hoods and Venters created the foundations for modern biological processes. And today, the Pages, Bezos’ and Zuckerbergs are creating a ubiquitous knowledge and communications environment.Read complete blog: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2014/05/beginnings

    Beginnings

    Research is all about new beginnings. Over the past century, relatively small groups of scientists who were in the right place at the right time and with particular knowledge sets and business acumen have advanced the state of science and technology (S&T). In the early 1900s, the Edisons, Fords and Wrights created the foundations for modern transport and production technologies. Fifty years ago, it was the Watsons, Hewletts and Packards who created similar foundations for modern computing machines. Twenty-five years ago, the Mullis’, Hoods and Venters created the foundations for modern biological processes. And today, the Pages, Bezos’ and Zuckerbergs are creating a ubiquitous knowledge and communications environment.

    Read complete blog: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/blogs/2014/05/beginnings

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  11. Scientist of the Week: Kees Jan van GroenigenEvery Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Kees Jan van Groenigen from Northern Arizona Univ. He and Bruce Hungate found that increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere cause soil microbes to produce more carbon dioxide, accelerating climate change.The article is here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/co2-begets-co2-speeds-climate-changeHe speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/scientist-week-kees-jan-van-groenigenHave a question for Kees Jan van Groenigen? Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

    Scientist of the Week: Kees Jan van Groenigen

    Every Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Kees Jan van Groenigen from Northern Arizona Univ. He and Bruce Hungate found that increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere cause soil microbes to produce more carbon dioxide, accelerating climate change.

    The article is here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/co2-begets-co2-speeds-climate-change

    He speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/scientist-week-kees-jan-van-groenigen

    Have a question for Kees Jan van Groenigen? Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

  12. 13 Notes
  13. Translational Facilities Blend Research with Clinical CareBasic research labs are being closely integrated with medical-based clinical facilities to accelerate the overall bench-to-bedside process.Translational research is a “new” science concept intended to translate research findings in basic research to practical applications in the health, environmental and agricultural sciences, among others. The popular meaning in its most notable application—health science—is translating basic knowledge into the development of new medical treatments or meaningful health outcomes—or put more simply “bench-to-bedside.”

    Translational Facilities Blend Research with Clinical Care

    Basic research labs are being closely integrated with medical-based clinical facilities to accelerate the overall bench-to-bedside process.

    Translational research is a “new” science concept intended to translate research findings in basic research to practical applications in the health, environmental and agricultural sciences, among others. The popular meaning in its most notable application—health science—is translating basic knowledge into the development of new medical treatments or meaningful health outcomes—or put more simply “bench-to-bedside.”

  14. 10 Notes
  15. Scientist of the Week: Donita BradyEvery Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Donita Brady from Duke Univ. She and a team found that drugs used to block copper absorption may find an additional use as a treatment for certain types of cancer.The first article may be found here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/scientists-target-cancers-thirst-copperShe speaks about her work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/scientist-week-donita-brady

    Scientist of the Week: Donita Brady

    Every Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Donita Brady from Duke Univ. She and a team found that drugs used to block copper absorption may find an additional use as a treatment for certain types of cancer.

    The first article may be found here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/scientists-target-cancers-thirst-copper

    She speaks about her work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/scientist-week-donita-brady

  16. 80 Notes
  17. Many “Acid Bath” Stem Cell Investigators Are InvestigatedIt seems as if everyone is being investigated. On April 1, a Riken Institute investigative committee charged Harvard University/Riken stem cell researcher Haruko Obokata with falsification and fabrication of images in a January Nature paper. In that paper, she had reported reprogramming ordinary cells into stem cells just by stressing them with coffee-mild acid.The alleged falsification—first discovered by anonymous Japanese scientist/bloggers—involved cutting and pasting gel images supposed to prove her starting cells were mature. The alleged fabrication involved false differentiation images supposed to prove her final cells were stem cells. (The latter images were outright taken from a completely different experiment, said the committee.)Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/05/many-%E2%80%9Cacid-bath%E2%80%9D-stem-cell-investigators-are-investigated

    Many “Acid Bath” Stem Cell Investigators Are Investigated

    It seems as if everyone is being investigated. On April 1, a Riken Institute investigative committee charged Harvard University/Riken stem cell researcher Haruko Obokata with falsification and fabrication of images in a January Nature paper. In that paper, she had reported reprogramming ordinary cells into stem cells just by stressing them with coffee-mild acid.

    The alleged falsification—first discovered by anonymous Japanese scientist/bloggers—involved cutting and pasting gel images supposed to prove her starting cells were mature. The alleged fabrication involved false differentiation images supposed to prove her final cells were stem cells. (The latter images were outright taken from a completely different experiment, said the committee.)

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/05/many-%E2%80%9Cacid-bath%E2%80%9D-stem-cell-investigators-are-investigated

  18. 14 Notes
  19. The Proving GroundWhat are the qualities that go into a top life science research university?Universities are primarily thought of as training grounds—a place for students to learn the concepts they need to succeed in their careers. But for many universities, they’re also proving grounds, places where conducting research, testing theories and making new discoveries are just as important as graduation rates. Not only does research fulfill the goal of advancing knowledge, but those schools with the best research departments attract the brightest minds and, in many cases, provide additional revenue to the school.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/proving-ground

    The Proving Ground

    What are the qualities that go into a top life science research university?

    Universities are primarily thought of as training grounds—a place for students to learn the concepts they need to succeed in their careers. But for many universities, they’re also proving grounds, places where conducting research, testing theories and making new discoveries are just as important as graduation rates. Not only does research fulfill the goal of advancing knowledge, but those schools with the best research departments attract the brightest minds and, in many cases, provide additional revenue to the school.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/proving-ground

  20. 8 Notes
  21. Federal Cuts Slow, But Don’t Stop GrowthSlowing federal investments in academia first surfaced in 2012, and likely will remain as federal spending cuts continue.For the first time in more than 50 years, the federal government reduced the absolute amount of support it supplied for higher education in 2012 from the amount it supplied in 2011 ($40.1 billion in 2012 versus $40.8 billion in 2011). In some previous years, such as 2007, the amount the federal government increased its academic support was less than the inflation rate for that year and so real dollar increases were not seen, but at least there was the perception that an increase was being made. The 1.6% decline in support seen in 2012, when added to the 1.7% inflation rate for that year means that the actual impact on academic support was more than 3%.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/federal-cuts-slow-dont-stop-growth

    Federal Cuts Slow, But Don’t Stop Growth

    Slowing federal investments in academia first surfaced in 2012, and likely will remain as federal spending cuts continue.

    For the first time in more than 50 years, the federal government reduced the absolute amount of support it supplied for higher education in 2012 from the amount it supplied in 2011 ($40.1 billion in 2012 versus $40.8 billion in 2011). In some previous years, such as 2007, the amount the federal government increased its academic support was less than the inflation rate for that year and so real dollar increases were not seen, but at least there was the perception that an increase was being made. The 1.6% decline in support seen in 2012, when added to the 1.7% inflation rate for that year means that the actual impact on academic support was more than 3%.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/federal-cuts-slow-dont-stop-growth

  22. 10 Notes
  23. Collaborative SustainabilityUniversities are teaming with various departments, industry and non-profits in the fight against energy-hogging campus laboratories.Academic researchers collaborate with one another on a regular basis—papers are published with multiple authors from multiple departments, spin-off technologies are often the brainchild of numerous scientists and new laboratories are built/renovated to physically and mentally encourage partnership. In this day and age, it’s only natural for one buzzword to meet the next—collaboration meet sustainability; you could learn something from each other.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/collaborative-sustainability

    Collaborative Sustainability

    Universities are teaming with various departments, industry and non-profits in the fight against energy-hogging campus laboratories.

    Academic researchers collaborate with one another on a regular basis—papers are published with multiple authors from multiple departments, spin-off technologies are often the brainchild of numerous scientists and new laboratories are built/renovated to physically and mentally encourage partnership. In this day and age, it’s only natural for one buzzword to meet the next—collaboration meet sustainability; you could learn something from each other.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/collaborative-sustainability

  24. 24 Notes
  25. Scientist of the Week: Shaun LovejoyEvery Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Shaun Lovejoy from McGill Univ. By analyzing temperature data all the way back to 1500, Lovejoy all but ruled out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the Earth’s climate.The original article is here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/statistics-rule-out-natural-warming-hypothesisHe speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/scientist-week-shaun-lovejoyHave s question for Shaun Lovejoy?Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

    Scientist of the Week: Shaun Lovejoy

    Every Thursday, Laboratory Equipment features a Scientist of the Week, chosen from the science industry’s latest headlines. This week’s scientist is Shaun Lovejoy from McGill Univ. By analyzing temperature data all the way back to 1500, Lovejoy all but ruled out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the Earth’s climate.

    The original article is here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/statistics-rule-out-natural-warming-hypothesis

    He speaks about his work here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/scientist-week-shaun-lovejoy

    Have s question for Shaun Lovejoy?Let us know and we’ll pass it on!

  26. 5 Notes
  27. The Good & Not-So-Good of Academic RankingsA plethora of academic ranking systems reveal “old school” traditions and new school limitations.The ranking of academic institutions is an active endeavor with numerous methodologies created by numerous organizations, often for various end purposes. The table on the right illustrates just four of the more popular ranking systems, with specific categorizations shown for two of them (USNWR and THE). The data shown in the table represent a range of rankings for various criteria.Read complete article here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/good-not-so-good-academic-rankings

    The Good & Not-So-Good of Academic Rankings

    A plethora of academic ranking systems reveal “old school” traditions and new school limitations.

    The ranking of academic institutions is an active endeavor with numerous methodologies created by numerous organizations, often for various end purposes. The table on the right illustrates just four of the more popular ranking systems, with specific categorizations shown for two of them (USNWR and THE). The data shown in the table represent a range of rankings for various criteria.

    Read complete article here: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/good-not-so-good-academic-rankings

  28. 15 Notes
  29. Are You Using the Right Viscometer?Just answer a few simple questions about your lab’s viscometer use and data management to avoid a 21 CFR compliance headache.The work horse in the viscosity measurement world for QC testing on pharmaceutical liquids and semi-solids is the rotational viscometer. The operator attaches the spindle specified in the test method, conditions the sample to the recommended temperature, turns on the motor at the defined speed and records the viscosity result in centipoises. What are the caveats?Find out now: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/are-you-using-right-viscometer

    Are You Using the Right Viscometer?

    Just answer a few simple questions about your lab’s viscometer use and data management to avoid a 21 CFR compliance headache.

    The work horse in the viscosity measurement world for QC testing on pharmaceutical liquids and semi-solids is the rotational viscometer. The operator attaches the spindle specified in the test method, conditions the sample to the recommended temperature, turns on the motor at the defined speed and records the viscosity result in centipoises. What are the caveats?

    Find out now: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/are-you-using-right-viscometer

  30. 4 Notes