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  1. Method Offers Fast Analysis of Steel Fiber-Reinforced ConcreteSteel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) is a practical construction material that is quick and easy to use. But monitoring SFRC quality is difficult, and this has kept industry acceptance low. A new method offers a quick way to examine its composition.Concrete is the world’s most popular building material: we use it to bridge rivers and valleys, build walls and line tunnels. The most common form of concrete is steel reinforced – a principle that will be familiar to anyone who has ever taken a closer look at a building site. Long steel rods, also called rebars, are bent into a dense framework, known as the reinforcement, which is then filled with concrete. But building with steel reinforced concrete is time consuming. It can take days or even weeks before the reinforcement for large buildings is fully assembled, the rebars bound together, and everything ready for the concrete pour.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/method-offers-fast-analysis-steel-fiber-reinforced-concrete

    Method Offers Fast Analysis of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) is a practical construction material that is quick and easy to use. But monitoring SFRC quality is difficult, and this has kept industry acceptance low. A new method offers a quick way to examine its composition.

    Concrete is the world’s most popular building material: we use it to bridge rivers and valleys, build walls and line tunnels. The most common form of concrete is steel reinforced – a principle that will be familiar to anyone who has ever taken a closer look at a building site. Long steel rods, also called rebars, are bent into a dense framework, known as the reinforcement, which is then filled with concrete. But building with steel reinforced concrete is time consuming. It can take days or even weeks before the reinforcement for large buildings is fully assembled, the rebars bound together, and everything ready for the concrete pour.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/11/method-offers-fast-analysis-steel-fiber-reinforced-concrete

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      Hmm
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