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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. 865 Notes
  2. mothernaturenetwork:

18 things you didn’t know about dog pawsWe all swoon for puppy-dog eyes, cocked ears and a wagging tail, but it would be a mistake to give your pup’s paws short shrift.

    mothernaturenetwork:

    18 things you didn’t know about dog paws
    We all swoon for puppy-dog eyes, cocked ears and a wagging tail, but it would be a mistake to give your pup’s paws short shrift.

  3. 175 Notes
    Reblogged: mothernaturenetwork
  4. pumml:

Gallery 1988 is celebrating its 10 year anniversary with a group show “The Subtle Art of Pop-Culture”. Subtle has never really been my style, but here is my ode to the great Breaking Bad. 14” x 24” very limited print will be available at the show this Friday night!

    pumml:

    Gallery 1988 is celebrating its 10 year anniversary with a group show “The Subtle Art of Pop-Culture”. Subtle has never really been my style, but here is my ode to the great Breaking Bad. 14” x 24” very limited print will be available at the show this Friday night!

  5. 2757 Notes
    Reblogged: pumml
  6. asapscience:

via Science Fever
  7. 966 Notes
    Reblogged: asapscience
  8. cracked:

Wanna feel like you’re in Young Frankenstein? Ask the wrong person the wrong thing one time.
5 Horrific Things You Learn Preserving Brains for a Living

#5. You are One Bad Question Away from Accidentally Owning a Room Full of Brains
One day, whilst doing all sorts of sinister science on some brain sections someone had given me for our research project, I foolishly asked, “Where does this tissue come from?” I should have known better. How many horror films start with a casual enquiry and someone digging around in stuff that should be left alone? Casually, my boss mentioned we had a whole bank of brain tissues at a different hospital. Years ago it had been an old gym used for physical therapy on injured patients. But it was built over solid concrete without a sprung floor so anyone who used it hobbled their knees. The gym fell into disrepair, and thrifty government employees piled the thing high with brain samples.

Read More

    cracked:

    Wanna feel like you’re in Young Frankenstein? Ask the wrong person the wrong thing one time.

    5 Horrific Things You Learn Preserving Brains for a Living

    #5. You are One Bad Question Away from Accidentally Owning a Room Full of Brains

    One day, whilst doing all sorts of sinister science on some brain sections someone had given me for our research project, I foolishly asked, “Where does this tissue come from?” I should have known better. How many horror films start with a casual enquiry and someone digging around in stuff that should be left alone? Casually, my boss mentioned we had a whole bank of brain tissues at a different hospital. Years ago it had been an old gym used for physical therapy on injured patients. But it was built over solid concrete without a sprung floor so anyone who used it hobbled their knees. The gym fell into disrepair, and thrifty government employees piled the thing high with brain samples.

    Read More

  9. 267 Notes
    Reblogged: cracked
  10. spaceplasma:

    The Doppler Shift

    The Doppler effect explains why objects moving towards us or away from us at high speed appear to have their colors shifted either towards blue or red respectively.

    When an object moves towards us, the crests of the light waves we see from it are compressed together, making the wavelength of the light shorter (and hence bluer), while for an object moving away the separation between crests is stretched, making the light’s wavelength longer (and hence redder). In the simulation above, the monochromatic source of light, as it moves right, would appear blue to an observer on the right-hand side, and red to an observer on the left.

    Scientists use spectroscopy — a technique that breaks light up into its component wavelengths — to study the vicinity of supermassive black holes. As matter spins around the black hole, the Doppler effect kicks in, this means that one side appears slightly redder, and the other slightly bluer than it really is. Note that the effect is exaggerated in this computer simulation, which depicts the vicinity of the black hole in the galaxy Messier 87 — one of the first to be studied by Hubble.

    Credit: ESA/Hubble (L. Calçada)

  11. 930 Notes
    Reblogged: spaceplasma
  12. asapscience:

Our fingers are crossed! 
via Science Dump

    asapscience:

    Our fingers are crossed! 

    via Science Dump

  13. 771 Notes
    Reblogged: asapscience
  14. bpod-mrc:

15 June 2014
Cuddling Kidneys
To some people horseshoes are lucky. Not so to those with fused or horseshoe kidneys. Aptly named, they’re not as rare as you might think; in fact they‘re the most common renal [kidney] anomaly in humans, affecting 1 in 500 of us. And for these unlucky people, the most common type of complication that arises is urinary tract infections and renal stones, which can be painful and cause serious health problems. The defect is caused during development; the normal rotation of the kidneys doesn’t fully complete, leaving the kidneys stuck together and facing a different way. Here doctors have used a multidetector CT scanner to take a closer look at the urinary tract and diagnose the malformation. Multiple renal stones can be seen – as white masses – within the patient’s fused kidneys.
Written by Yalda Javadi
—
Image by Malai Muttarak Chiang Mai University, ThailandOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal, January 2012
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

    bpod-mrc:

    15 June 2014

    Cuddling Kidneys

    To some people horseshoes are lucky. Not so to those with fused or horseshoe kidneys. Aptly named, they’re not as rare as you might think; in fact they‘re the most common renal [kidney] anomaly in humans, affecting 1 in 500 of us. And for these unlucky people, the most common type of complication that arises is urinary tract infections and renal stones, which can be painful and cause serious health problems. The defect is caused during development; the normal rotation of the kidneys doesn’t fully complete, leaving the kidneys stuck together and facing a different way. Here doctors have used a multidetector CT scanner to take a closer look at the urinary tract and diagnose the malformation. Multiple renal stones can be seen – as white masses – within the patient’s fused kidneys.

    Written by Yalda Javadi

    Image by Malai Muttarak
    Chiang Mai University, Thailand
    Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
    Research published in Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal, January 2012

    You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

  15. 167 Notes
    Reblogged: bpod-mrc
  16. currentsinbiology:

Proliferation cues ‘natural killer’ cells for job change
PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] —The immune system maintains a rich abundance of “natural killer” cells to confront microbial invaders, but as the body gains the upper hand in various infections it sometimes starts to produce even more of the cells. For three decades, scientists haven’t understood what purpose that serves. In a new paper, Brown University researchers show one: proliferation helps change the NK cells’ function from stimulating the immune response to calming it down, lest it get out of hand.
In a series of experiments now published online in the Journal of Immunology, the researchers show that the process of proliferation unlocks expression of the gene in NK cells for producing Interleukin-10(IL-10), a protein that moderates other immune system cells.

"It’s really important for regulating potentially dangerous CD8 T cell responses," said Margarite Tarrio, co-lead author of the paper and a graduate student in the lab of Brown immunology Professor Christine Biron. "If you get CD8 T cells that are hyperactivated they can cause a tremendous amount of damage."

Human Lymphocyte, 2011, by David Scharf, Los Angeles. A human “Natural Killer” lymphocyte, a type of cell that mediates the immune system. This image is from a scanning electron micrograph, with the colours taken from multiple secondary detectors in a technique invented by the photographer.

    currentsinbiology:

    Proliferation cues ‘natural killer’ cells for job change

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] —The immune system maintains a rich abundance of “natural killer” cells to confront microbial invaders, but as the body gains the upper hand in various infections it sometimes starts to produce even more of the cells. For three decades, scientists haven’t understood what purpose that serves. In a new paper, Brown University researchers show one: proliferation helps change the NK cells’ function from stimulating the immune response to calming it down, lest it get out of hand.

    In a series of experiments now published online in the Journal of Immunology, the researchers show that the process of proliferation unlocks expression of the gene in NK cells for producing Interleukin-10(IL-10), a protein that moderates other immune system cells.

    "It’s really important for regulating potentially dangerous CD8 T cell responses," said Margarite Tarrio, co-lead author of the paper and a graduate student in the lab of Brown immunology Professor Christine Biron. "If you get CD8 T cells that are hyperactivated they can cause a tremendous amount of damage."

    Human Lymphocyte, 2011, by David Scharf, Los Angeles. A human “Natural Killer” lymphocyte, a type of cell that mediates the immune system. This image is from a scanning electron micrograph, with the colours taken from multiple secondary detectors in a technique invented by the photographer.

  17. 148 Notes
    Reblogged: currentsinbiology
  18. spaceexp:

Curiosity’s Left Front and Center Wheels - Sol 658

    spaceexp:

    Curiosity’s Left Front and Center Wheels - Sol 658

  19. 183 Notes
    Reblogged: spaceexp
  20. nubbsgalore:

    burchell’s zebras photographed by michel denis-huot in masai mara. dyk: the best supported hypothesis to date suggests that zebras evolved to have stripes in order to repel biting flies, which can carry deadly diseases and collectively draw significant blood loss. no one has yet to figure out why the flies don’t like landing on stripped surfaces, but we know that they don’t. (see also: previous posts of kenya)

  21. 339 Notes
    Reblogged: nubbsgalore
  22. "If humans are the most intelligent beings on earth, why is it that we are destroying our only home?"

    - Dr. Jane Goodall (via thedragoninmygarage)
  23. 4047 Notes
    Reblogged: thedragoninmygarage
  24. thankstextbooks:

Geochemistry as taught by Dr. Phil.
— Submitted by Jenn

    thankstextbooks:

    Geochemistry as taught by Dr. Phil.


    Submitted by Jenn

  25. 912 Notes
    Reblogged: freshphotons
  26. mudwerks:

(via 11 Images from the American Museum of Natural History’s Archives | Mental Floss)
I will call him Squirmy…
  27. 550 Notes
  28. skunkbear:

    Scientists at MIT have developed a new simulation that traces 13 billion years of cosmic evolution. They start the simulation shortly after the big bang with a region of space much smaller than the universe (a mere 350 million light years across).  Still, it’s big enough to follow the forces that helped create the galaxies we see today, and correctly predict the gas and metal content of those galaxies.

    At first, we see dark matter clustering due to the force of gravity (first two GIFs). Then we see visible matter — blue for cool clouds of gas where galaxies form, red for more violent explosive galaxies (second two GIFs).

    Super massive blackholes form, superheating the material around them, causing bright white explosions that enrich the space between galaxies with warm but sparse gas (fifth GIF).

    Different elements (represented by different colors in the sixth GIF) are spread through the universe.

    We arrive at a distribution of dark matter that looks similar to the one we see in our universe today (seventh GIF).

    The simulation is so complex it would take two thousand years to render on a single desktop. And it’s kinda beautiful.

    Image Credit: MIT and Nature Video

  29. 11793 Notes
    Reblogged: freshphotons