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An excellent international resource for the laboratory equipment industry.

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  1. Alternative to Pap Smear Sparks Concerns

    A high-tech screening tool for cervical cancer is facing pushback from more than a dozen patient groups, who warn that the genetic test could displace a simpler, cheaper and more established mainstay of women’s health: the Pap smear.

    The new test comes from Roche and uses DNA to detect the human papillomavirus, or HPV, which that causes nearly all cases of cervical cancer. While such technology has been available for years, Roche now wants the FDA to approve its test as a first-choice option for cervical cancer screening, bypassing the decades-old Pap smear.

    http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/alternative-pap-smear-sparks-concerns

  2. 16 Notes
  3. Lasers Enable Observation of Frantic Electrons

    A research team at the Univ. of Kansas has used high-powered lasers to track the speed and movement of electrons inside an innovative material that is just one atom thick. Their findings are published in the current issue of ACS Nano.

    The work at KU’s Ultrafast Laser Lab could help point the way to next-generation transistors and solar panels made of solid, atomically thin materials.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/lasers-enable-observation-frantic-electrons

  4. 9 Notes
  5. Stadium Acoustics Can Damage HearingThe roar of the crowd is a major part of the excitement of attending a sporting event. A noisy, engaged crowd makes for a better experience for fans, and is often credited with helping the players on the field, too. “The players love it,” said Carl Francis, director of communications for the NFL Players Association. “Fan support definitely has an impact on the players.”Stadium designers know this, and the new generation of stadiums now incorporate design features that help boost fan support by trapping and amplifying crowd noise. The most important aspects are to keep the size of the stadium as small as possible, and to provide reflecting surfaces that can turn the noise back to the crowd, said Jack Wrightson, a Dallas-based acoustical consultant who has worked on the design of dozens of athletic venues in North America.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/stadium-acoustics-can-damage-hearing

    Stadium Acoustics Can Damage Hearing

    The roar of the crowd is a major part of the excitement of attending a sporting event. A noisy, engaged crowd makes for a better experience for fans, and is often credited with helping the players on the field, too. “The players love it,” said Carl Francis, director of communications for the NFL Players Association. “Fan support definitely has an impact on the players.”

    Stadium designers know this, and the new generation of stadiums now incorporate design features that help boost fan support by trapping and amplifying crowd noise. The most important aspects are to keep the size of the stadium as small as possible, and to provide reflecting surfaces that can turn the noise back to the crowd, said Jack Wrightson, a Dallas-based acoustical consultant who has worked on the design of dozens of athletic venues in North America.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/stadium-acoustics-can-damage-hearing

  6. 13 Notes
  7. No Debate: Cutting Salt Lowers Strokes, Heart AttacksThe salt debate has filled the pages of health magazines and newspapers for years. From John Swales’ original skepticism in 1988 to the Godlee’s sharp call to reality in 1996, the debate has transcended the scientific arena into public opinion and media campaigns with increasingly passionate tones. Now a new study, published in BMJ Open, suggests that a 15 percent drop in daily salt intake in England between 2003 and 2011 led to 42 percent less stroke deaths and a 40 percent drop in deaths from coronary heart disease. So where does this leave the salt debate?The salt controversy has been particularly heated since the translation of the results of scientific studies into public health and policy actions and the “salt debate” has become for some a “salt war.” The progression of this debate into a war resembles past and present debates (let us think about John Snow and the cholera epidemic in the 19th century, the long-lasting denial of the harm of tobacco smoking in the 20th century, global warming and climate change in the 21st century), when the translation of science into practice clashes with vested interests.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/no-debate-cutting-salt-lowers-strokes-heart-attacks

    No Debate: Cutting Salt Lowers Strokes, Heart Attacks

    The salt debate has filled the pages of health magazines and newspapers for years. From John Swales’ original skepticism in 1988 to the Godlee’s sharp call to reality in 1996, the debate has transcended the scientific arena into public opinion and media campaigns with increasingly passionate tones. Now a new study, published in BMJ Open, suggests that a 15 percent drop in daily salt intake in England between 2003 and 2011 led to 42 percent less stroke deaths and a 40 percent drop in deaths from coronary heart disease. So where does this leave the salt debate?

    The salt controversy has been particularly heated since the translation of the results of scientific studies into public health and policy actions and the “salt debate” has become for some a “salt war.” The progression of this debate into a war resembles past and present debates (let us think about John Snow and the cholera epidemic in the 19th century, the long-lasting denial of the harm of tobacco smoking in the 20th century, global warming and climate change in the 21st century), when the translation of science into practice clashes with vested interests.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/no-debate-cutting-salt-lowers-strokes-heart-attacks

  8. 22 Notes
  9. Nanoparticles Deliver Three Cancer DrugsDelivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.Now, MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoparticles-deliver-three-cancer-drugs

    Nanoparticles Deliver Three Cancer Drugs

    Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.

    Now, MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoparticles-deliver-three-cancer-drugs

  10. 21 Notes
  11. Coke’s Soda Sales Are Down for First Time in 10 YearsCoca-Cola sold more drinks in the first quarter, but it wasn’t because of soda.The world’s biggest beverage maker says that its global sales volume for soda fell for first time in at least a decade. The drop was offset by stronger sales of noncarbonated drinks, such as juice, and overall volume rose 2 percent.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/coke%E2%80%99s-soda-sales-are-down-first-time-10-years

    Coke’s Soda Sales Are Down for First Time in 10 Years

    Coca-Cola sold more drinks in the first quarter, but it wasn’t because of soda.

    The world’s biggest beverage maker says that its global sales volume for soda fell for first time in at least a decade. The drop was offset by stronger sales of noncarbonated drinks, such as juice, and overall volume rose 2 percent.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/coke%E2%80%99s-soda-sales-are-down-first-time-10-years

  12. 22 Notes
  13. Martian Soils May Yield FruitThe soil on Mars may be suitable for cultivating food crops – this is the prognosis of a study by plant ecologist Wieger Wamelink of Wageningen Univ. & Research Centre. This would prove highly practical if we ever decide to send people on a one-way trip to the red planet. After all, if we are going to live anywhere in outer space in the future Mars stands a good chance of being the place.In a unique pilot experiment Wamelink tested the growth of 14 plant varieties on artificial Mars soil over 50 days. NASA composed the soil based on the volcanic soil of Hawaii. To his surprise, the plants grew well; some even blossomed.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/martian-soils-may-yield-fruit

    Martian Soils May Yield Fruit

    The soil on Mars may be suitable for cultivating food crops – this is the prognosis of a study by plant ecologist Wieger Wamelink of Wageningen Univ. & Research Centre. This would prove highly practical if we ever decide to send people on a one-way trip to the red planet. After all, if we are going to live anywhere in outer space in the future Mars stands a good chance of being the place.

    In a unique pilot experiment Wamelink tested the growth of 14 plant varieties on artificial Mars soil over 50 days. NASA composed the soil based on the volcanic soil of Hawaii. To his surprise, the plants grew well; some even blossomed.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/martian-soils-may-yield-fruit

  14. 42 Notes
  15. Puget Sound’s Waters Come from Deep CanyonThe headwaters for Puget Sound’s famously rich waters lie far below the surface, in a submarine canyon that draws nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean. New measurements may explain how the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters are able to support so many shellfish, salmon runs and even the occasional pod of whales.Univ. of Washington oceanographers made the first detailed measurements at the headwater’s source, a submarine canyon offshore from the strait that separates the U.S. and Canada. Observations show water surging up through the canyon and mixing at surprisingly high rates, according to a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/puget-sound%E2%80%99s-waters-come-deep-canyon

    Puget Sound’s Waters Come from Deep Canyon

    The headwaters for Puget Sound’s famously rich waters lie far below the surface, in a submarine canyon that draws nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean. New measurements may explain how the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters are able to support so many shellfish, salmon runs and even the occasional pod of whales.

    Univ. of Washington oceanographers made the first detailed measurements at the headwater’s source, a submarine canyon offshore from the strait that separates the U.S. and Canada. Observations show water surging up through the canyon and mixing at surprisingly high rates, according to a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/puget-sound%E2%80%99s-waters-come-deep-canyon

  16. 13 Notes
  17. Nutrient-rich Forests Store More CarbonThe ability of forests to sequester carbon from the atmosphere depends on nutrients available in the forest soils, shows new research from an international team of researchers, including the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.The study showed that forests growing in fertile soils, with ample nutrients, are able to sequester about 30 percent of the carbon that they take up during photosynthesis. In contrast, forests growing in nutrient-poor soils may retain only 6 percent of that carbon. The rest is returned to the atmosphere as respiration.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nutrient-rich-forests-store-more-carbon

    Nutrient-rich Forests Store More Carbon

    The ability of forests to sequester carbon from the atmosphere depends on nutrients available in the forest soils, shows new research from an international team of researchers, including the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

    The study showed that forests growing in fertile soils, with ample nutrients, are able to sequester about 30 percent of the carbon that they take up during photosynthesis. In contrast, forests growing in nutrient-poor soils may retain only 6 percent of that carbon. The rest is returned to the atmosphere as respiration.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nutrient-rich-forests-store-more-carbon

  18. 21 Notes
  19. Researchers ID Four New Killer SpongesKiller sponges sound like creatures from a B-grade horror movie. In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.A far cry from your basic kitchen sponge, these animals look more like bare twigs or small shrubs covered with tiny hairs. But the hairs consist of tightly packed bundles of microscopic hooks that trap small animals such as shrimp-like amphipods. Once an animal becomes trapped, it takes only a few hours for sponge cells to begin engulfing and digesting it. After several days, all that is left is an empty shell.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/researchers-id-four-new-killer-sponges

    Researchers ID Four New Killer Sponges

    Killer sponges sound like creatures from a B-grade horror movie. In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.

    A far cry from your basic kitchen sponge, these animals look more like bare twigs or small shrubs covered with tiny hairs. But the hairs consist of tightly packed bundles of microscopic hooks that trap small animals such as shrimp-like amphipods. Once an animal becomes trapped, it takes only a few hours for sponge cells to begin engulfing and digesting it. After several days, all that is left is an empty shell.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/researchers-id-four-new-killer-sponges

  20. 23 Notes
  21. 14 Women Who've Won Science Nobel Prizes Since Marie Curie
  22. 429 Notes
    Reblogged: medical-gal
  23. Image of the Week: How to Wash Eyes in SpaceWe all know what to do if something harmful splashes into our eyes: wash with lots of water. As with many things in space, however, a simple operation on Earth can become quite complicated when floating around in weightlessness.Imagine you are an astronaut on the International Space Station and a fleck of dust gets in your eye or you accidently splash chili sauce or something even worse in there. Where do you get the water from and how do you rinse your eyes? There are no flowing-water taps and even if there were cupping water in your hands is impossible in zero-gravity.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-how-wash-eyes-space

    Image of the Week: How to Wash Eyes in Space

    We all know what to do if something harmful splashes into our eyes: wash with lots of water. As with many things in space, however, a simple operation on Earth can become quite complicated when floating around in weightlessness.

    Imagine you are an astronaut on the International Space Station and a fleck of dust gets in your eye or you accidently splash chili sauce or something even worse in there. Where do you get the water from and how do you rinse your eyes? There are no flowing-water taps and even if there were cupping water in your hands is impossible in zero-gravity.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/image-week-how-wash-eyes-space

  24. 29 Notes
  25. A Few ‘Problem Wells’ Source of Greenhouse GasHigh levels of the greenhouse gas methane were found above shale gas wells at a production point not thought to be an important emissions source, according to a study jointly led by Purdue and Cornell universities. The findings could have implications for the evaluation of the environmental impacts from natural gas production.The study, which is one of only a few to use a so-called “top down” approach that measures methane gas levels in the air above wells, identified seven individual well pads with high emission levels and established their stage in the shale-gas development process.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/few-problem-wells-source-greenhouse-gas

    A Few ‘Problem Wells’ Source of Greenhouse Gas

    High levels of the greenhouse gas methane were found above shale gas wells at a production point not thought to be an important emissions source, according to a study jointly led by Purdue and Cornell universities. The findings could have implications for the evaluation of the environmental impacts from natural gas production.

    The study, which is one of only a few to use a so-called “top down” approach that measures methane gas levels in the air above wells, identified seven individual well pads with high emission levels and established their stage in the shale-gas development process.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/few-problem-wells-source-greenhouse-gas

  26. 5 Notes
  27. Quantum Dots Offer Solar Cells a Bright FutureA house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from Univ. of Milano-Bicocca (UNIMIB). Their project demonstrates that superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.“The key accomplishment is the demonstration of large-area luminescent solar concentrators that use a new generation of specially engineered quantum dots,” says lead researcher Victor Klimov of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP) at Los Alamos.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/quantum-dots-offer-solar-cells-bright-future

    Quantum Dots Offer Solar Cells a Bright Future

    A house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from Univ. of Milano-Bicocca (UNIMIB). Their project demonstrates that superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.

    “The key accomplishment is the demonstration of large-area luminescent solar concentrators that use a new generation of specially engineered quantum dots,” says lead researcher Victor Klimov of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP) at Los Alamos.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/quantum-dots-offer-solar-cells-bright-future

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  29. Scientists Examine World’s Most Popular Drug: Caffeine

    It seems there are new caffeine-infused products hitting the shelves every day. From energy drinks to gum and even jerky, our love affair with that little molecule shows no signs of slowing.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/04/scientists-examine-worlds-most-popular-drug-caffeine

  30. 41 Notes